Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
1:25 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Timeline: The complicated relationship between the DIA and the city of Detroit

The Detroit Institute of Arts in 1927, and the museum now.
DIA/Flickr

Even before Detroit officially filed for bankruptcy last July, many Michiganders and outsiders feared for the future of the Detroit Institute of Arts – the city’s so-called "crown jewel."

With the city in financial turmoil, the newly appointed emergency manager of Detroit started a catalog of city assets. Many feared the DIA's status as a city asset would mean part of the museum’s collection could be sold off to satisfy creditors.

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Stateside
2:32 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

How a resistance fighter in Czechoslovakia became one of Michigan's most prominent engineers

Charles Novacek as a child.
"Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance"

An interview with Sandra Novacek.

The next time you're in downtown Detroit, and you walk by the Cobo Center or the People Mover, or in Ypsilanti and you see Washtenaw Community College, or Providence Hospital in Southfield or many other buildings around Southeast Michigan — stop for a moment and remember this name: Charles Novacek.

He was born in what was then Czechoslovakia, and grew up through his country's occupation by the Nazis and then the Communists. He began training as a resistance fighter as a boy of 11, and continued the fight as he grew up. He endured prison and torture before escaping to a refugee camp and, ultimately, to a new life in Michigan.

Charles Novacek became a noted engineer in Michigan, working on many projects in the state that still stand today. And before he died in 2007, he wrote a memoir entitled "Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance".

The book has now been published by Charles Novacek's wife, Sandra. We talk with Sandra about her husband's journey. 

For more information on the book, visit www.charlesnovacekbooks.com.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
1:26 pm
Tue March 25, 2014

'The Nutcracker' will get a makeover in Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids Ballet performers.
Clark Art Photography Grand Rapids Ballet Facebook

Chris Van Allsburg, known for his book "The Polar Express" will design the new production for the Grand Rapids Ballet, and the set will be built by designer Eugene Lee, known for his work on SNL.

More from the Grand Rapids Press:

A $2.5 million fundraising campaign, in part, is providing for the 42-year-old company's first entirely new production of "The Nutcracker" in three decades…

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Arts & Culture
7:00 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Not just another movie about Detroit: Free Press Film Fest kicks off an experiment

On opening night, the festival audience filled most of the Fillmore Theater in Detroit.
Kate Wells

"One great movie can change you," the ads said. See if they're right: listen to the full story above.

I like movies. You like movies.

So let’s get together, watch some new documentaries about Detroit, and then talk with the people who actually have the power to fix some of the stuff that’s wrong in this city.

That’s the idea behind the first-ever Detroit Free Press Film Fest, which kicked off last week with a line stretched for blocks around the Fillmore Theater.

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun March 23, 2014

When proverbial phrases aren’t from proverbs

There are not enough proverbs in the world for everything that is proverbial.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan Professor of English Anne Curzan examine the overuse of the word proverbial.

The term proverbial first appears in the English language in 1475. At this time, a proverbial saying is a proverb itself. However, by the late 16th century, proverbial is used to describe sayings that are well-known, or merely similar to proverbs.

Nowadays, this usage continues. Curzan looked in the Corpus of Contemporary American English to find some examples.

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Stateside
5:19 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

New law allows you to bring your own wine to Michigan restaurants

Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

A new Michigan law will now allow you to literally BYOB, bring your own bottle of wine to a restaurant. Chris is the Chief Restaurant Critic and Wine Writer at Hour Magazine, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
2:49 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

On Twitter's birthday, everyone is retweeting their first tweets

Happy birthday, Twitter. Hashtag twitter.
user: shawncampbell Flickr

Today is Twitter's 8th birthday.

Naturally, everyone is celebrating by participating in self-indulgent retweets of the first thing they ever said.

Here's ours from early 2009.

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Arts & Culture
11:43 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Ann Arbor Schools losing kids; is $10 million short

District officials aren't sure why 150 more kids left this year, compared to last year.
GsGeorge WIKIMEDIA Commons

First, there's the mystery of the disappearing kids. 

Ann Arbor's enrollment dropped by about 200 students this year. 

That's a surprise, School Board Treasurer Glenn Nelson says, because enrollment was basically stable last year. 

Administrators do know where about 50 of those kids went: the Washtenaw Intermediate School District, which offers specialized programming. 

But the other 150 students?

"I don't know," says Nelson. "And that's something I wish we knew more about." 

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That's What They Say
9:05 am
Sun March 16, 2014

You’re 'in-' for some confusion with prefixes

If something is inflammable, it is no longer entirely clear whether we can set it on fire, or we can’t.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan take on the prefix “in-.”

There are two types of “in-” prefixes, and although they sound the same, they have different meanings. The first “in-” means “in or into,” like the examples income and inland. The second “in-” means “not,” as in the words inedible or incomprehensible.

The term inflammable uses the “in or into” meaning of the prefix. Consequently, something that is inflammable can be put into flame.

However, the prefix has caused some confusion.

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Arts & Culture
8:47 am
Sat March 15, 2014

Children's opera performed in concentration camp coming to Detroit

The Michigan Opera Theatre Children’s Chorus will perform Brundibar this weekend at the Detroit Opera House. The children's opera was originally performed in a concentration camp during the Holocaust. 

In the 1940s, European Jews were sent to Theresienstadt in the Czech Republic. It was a transit camp where Jews were sent before being moved to other concentration camps, including Auschwitz.

The Nazis also used Theresienstadt in their propaganda efforts.

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Arts & Culture
8:08 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Is this a Banksy? Or did two Detroit guys do it?

The piece sits in the 555 Gallery in Detroit. Widely believed to be by Bansky, now two Detroiters say they did it.
Kate Wells

This next story might win for weirdest art mystery we've heard in a while.

For a few years, a Detroit art gallery has proudly displayed a big piece of street art.

It's widely believed to be by Banksy, the most famous, mysterious street artist working today.

But now that the gallery is trying to sell the piece, two local artists claim they are the real painters.

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Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Why this guy is pitching Detroit at SXSW festival in Austin

A screenshot from Lowe Campbell Ewald video.
Lowe Campbell Ewald video. YouTube.

The South by Southwest festival is happening right now in Austin, Texas. It's where the cutting edge of music, technology and new thinking all come together.

And that's where our next guest has been busy pitching Detroit to all those creative entrepreneurs. Earlier this week, he hosted a session called "We're Moving to Detroit, and So Should You."

Iain Lanivich is the digital creative director of Lowe Campbell Ewald, and he joins us from Austin.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Meet Heywood Banks: Michigan comedian, lover of toast

Comedian Heywood Banks
Heywood Banks

One of Michigan's big contributions to the world of comedy is Heywood Banks.

Whether he's playing his guitar or his trusty toaster, he's made audiences laugh all over the country.

He's appeared on A&E, MTV, and Entertainment Tonight. And he was the MC for both nights of the 2012 Ann Arbor Folk Festival.

He'll be playing at The Ark on March 15; he joined us today on Stateside.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:25 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Giving a voice to prisoners: Michigan's Prison Creative Arts Project

The cover of the sixth annual Michigan Review of Prisoner Creative Writing.
PCAP University of Michigan

Just because you've been found guilty of a crime and sentenced to prison, doesn't mean you no longer have a voice, an opinion, something to say.

And that's why each year the Prison Creative Arts Project puts out the call to prisoners all around Michigan: Send us your poetry, your essays, your short stories.

PCAP goes through each submission and selects work to go into its annual Michigan Review of Prisoner Creative Writing.  They're about to release their sixth volume. This one is called "The Sky Is On Fire, After All."

Philip Christman edits the Review, and he's an English Department instructor at the University of Michigan. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Arts & Culture
5:00 am
Tue March 11, 2014

Homeless veteran buried in National Cemetery after 5 months unclaimed in morgue

Larry Tucker was a Navy vet, a sci fi fan, and a videographer
Rick Lieder

A homeless navy veteran died in Ann Arbor last October.

No family members came forward to claim his body.

So for five months, the veteran’s body lay in the morgue.

Now, finally, thanks to a few friends who refused to give up, Lawrence Tucker’s body was laid to rest last week at the Great Lakes National Cemetery in Holly, Michigan.

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Arts & Culture
4:45 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

The Living Room: Identity and acceptance in West Michigan's LGBT community

Rachel Gleason

Everybody’s got a story.  Some are very extraordinary stories.  It might be a good for somebody to look into theirs, because a story is the shortest distance between two people.

The Living Room is our ongoing storytelling series, curated by Allison Downey.

This story is the first in our series about identity and acceptance in West Michigan’s LGBT community.

Rachel Gleason spent much of youth at her church; worshipping, studying, singing, babysitting.

The church was her life.

But that began to change when Rachel started to understand who she really was.

*Listen to Rachel’s story above.

Allison Downey curates stories for our ongoing series The Living Room. This story was produced by Zak Rosen. Support was provided by a Kalamazoo Community Foundation grant from the Fetzer Institute Fund.

That's What They Say
8:46 am
Sun March 9, 2014

What o'clock is it?

That's What They Say for 3/9/2014

The contraction of the word “of” to o’ is considered highly informal, but the phrase “o’clock” is somehow different. 

This week on That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss how we talk about time.

The expression “o’clock” comes from “of clock” as in “according to the clock,” says Curzan.

It might seem like an antiquated phrase, but "o'clock" is still used quite a lot.  But, there is something else on the rise and that is the use of a.m. and p.m.

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Arts & Culture
11:58 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Big changes coming to ArtPrize this year

Families take pictures in front of "Rusty" near the Grand Rapids Public Museum during ArtPrize 2011. Voters picked Rusty as number 5 in the top ten.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

ArtPrize, the annual art competition in Grand Rapids, will still award $560,000 this year, but professional jurors will now have a bigger say in who gets the money.

The people who visit ArtPrize and register to vote have always decided the winner. But this year there will be two top prizes, each worth $200,000. One will go to the top vote-getter. The other winner will be decided by three art jurors.

Dana Friis-Hansen heads the Grand Rapids Arts Museum. He thinks the change will attract more professional artists to ArtPrize.

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Stateside
6:11 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Photographer captures images, tales of Michigan's barns

Mary Keithan

As you drive along Michigan highways and roads, how much attention do you pay to barns? My next guest has discovered that those easy to overlook barns tell fascinating stories of the people and the communities that built them.

Mary Keithan took her first photograph of a barn in 1990 and that launched a nine-year push to photograph and tell the stories of barns all over Michigan.

Her photographs are now on exhibit at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum.

Mary Keithan  joined us today.

Arts & Culture
3:39 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

In Ann Arbor, public art money will be spent on sewers, roads

"Radius," by Ed Carpenter, hangs in Ann Arbor's Justice Center. It's an example of the much-debated public arts project.
Ann Arbor Public Art Commission City of Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor's city council is sending almost $100,000 of public art money back to city services. 

Last year, they pulled the plug on a controversial plan called "Percent for Art." 

For five years, it set aside money from some new city construction projects and put it towards art installations.  

Now, council members are sending the leftover money back to city services, to pay for things like roads and sewers.  

They will hold onto enough money to wrap up a few art projects, and they're asking for a new plan for future public art. 

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