Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

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LOS ANGELES (AP) - Casey Kasem, the smooth-voiced radio broadcaster who became the king of the top 40 countdown, has died at age 82.

Danny Deraney, publicist for Kasem's daughter, Kerri, says Kasem died Sunday morning.

Kasem's "American Top 40" began on July 4, 1970, in Los Angeles. The No. 1 song on his list then was "Mama Told Me Not to Come," by Three Dog Night.

Inside the Arab American National Museum.
www.accesscommunity.org

DEARBORN, Michigan – The Arab American National Museum plans to host Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder for a tour, meetings with community leaders and town hall-style event.

The museum in Dearborn says the visit is planned for Monday, including remarks by Snyder around midday. 

Dearborn has large Arab and Muslim populations. The museum says Manal Saab, who is on the museum's National Advisory Board, invited the governor to visit.

Brendon Connelly / Flickr

Michigan destinations are working their way into these lists: Saugatuck was voted No. 1 Summer Weekend Escape in America in a recent USA Today reader poll. And a somewhat obscure Upper Peninsula drive got on a top 10 "Best U.S. Road Trips" list.

Ellen Creager, a Detroit Free Press Travel writer, says the big reason for the publicity is the Pure Michigan campaign. However, don’t limit yourself to “Cool Places to Visit” lists when choosing your next Michigan vacation spot.

Moiz Karim is a visiting journalist from Pakistan, working in the Michigan Radio newsroom for three weeks.
Reem Nasr / Michigan Radio

I am Moiz Karim, a journalist from Pakistan.

I work for Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation, commonly known as Radio Pakistan, as an editor in Islamabad.

Before Radio Pakistan I had worked for different regional and national newspapers and a newswire. I started my career at a local weekly newspaper and worked my way up to national dailies.

Green Alley Project

When you close your eyes and think of an alley, what do you see?

Trash? Junky cars? A place where danger lurks?

Or do you see a place where people might stroll? Perhaps car-free? Certainly cleaned up.

That's what Sue Mosey sees.

She's president of Midtown Detroit, Inc., a nonprofit community-development group that is working to transform gritty urban alleys in Midtown Detroit into something that is green, something you would want to walk through, and something that helps with urban revitalization.

Mosey said the alleys in Midtown Detroit were in very bad condition, some even collapsing. Mosey said the group worked with the Department of Public works to help with underground repairs.

“Since we are going to have to redo them anyway, we figured why not make them green and sustainable and beautiful,” Mosey said.

They repave, rebuild, and add lighting to the alleys, as well as other projects to make them more attractive and safe for the city.

“It’s an opportunity to reuse something that is usually seen more as a negative and create something unexpected and really positive and people really respond to that,” Mosey said. 

*Listen to full interview above. 

Elliot Rodger's shooting rampage near the University of California Santa Barbara campus claimed the lives of seven people, including his own.

His hate-filled videos and "manifesto" expressed a sense of male sexual entitlement that struck a deep chord with women around the world.

Almost immediately after the May 23 shooting rampage in Isla Vista, women took to Twitter to share and vent about their experiences with sexual fear, harassment and sexual assault.

#YesAllWomen has been exploding since it erupted May 24.

Women are sharing thoughts such as:"#YesAllWomen because apparently the clothes I wear is a more valid form of consent than the words I say".

And from Aimee Mann: "The cops who asked me,"well, what were you wearing?" when I reported an attack and attempted rape.#YesAllWomen"

Stateside wanted to get the thoughts on #YesAllWomen from a dad. How should dads be talking to their sons? How can dads help today's women feel more secure around men?

Doug French is the co-founder of the Dad 2.0 Summit, and co-creator (with his ex-wife) of the blog "When the Flames Go Up", about co-parenting after divorce.

French said he was very surprised by the tweets. “I had no idea,” he said.

French added that dads should be talking with their sons about the issue, so that when they become men they will respect women. However, he said that just talking will not suffice.

“You can talk to your kids as much as possible about this sort of thing, but the thing that trumps that is example and the sheer quantity of examples that they see,” French said.

He added that where the dads can come in is stopping the systemic misogyny that is learned.

“One of my favorite tweets is the tweet that said, ‘I started reading #YesAllWomen because I have a daughter. But it became more apparent that it’s more important because I have two sons,’” French said.  

*Listen to full interview above.

Heads Up!

Sometimes we’re warned to watch our head, but when you think about it, that doesn't seem physically possible.

How can you watch your head?

This week on That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan analyze phrases and expressions involving the word ‘head’.

blackenterprise.com

DETROIT (AP) - A family spokeswoman says Don Davis, a longtime Detroit musician, composer and recording executive, has died at 75.

Lisa Wilmore said Davis died Thursday in Michigan after a brief illness. She declined to say where he died.

Davis was a session musician during the 1960s at Motown Records in Detroit. He then went to work for Memphis, Tennessee-based Stax Records. He also started the independent Groovesville label.

He was a co-writer and co-producer of "Who's Making Love," a 1968 Stax hit for Johnnie Taylor.

Charles & Adrienne Esseltine / Flickr

What if you were a writer, a journalist, or a poet, and you were given a free house in Detroit?

You'd be an urban homesteader, living in the city and writing about it.

That's the idea behind a project called Write a House.

Journalist Sarah Cox is the co-founder of Write A House and explained how it works on Stateside.  

Listen to interview in link above.  

Peter Martorano / Flickr

The Literary Map of Detroit is not your typical, predictable map of the Motor City. It looks at Detroit through the eyes of writers, poets and storytellers.

The map is actually a website, with locations that are mentioned in literary works by Detroit authors.

Frank Rashid, an English professor at Marygrove college and lifelong Detroiter, created the map.

Rashid created the map to challenge the belief that Detroit’s economic and social problems stem from one simple cause, such as a politician or Detroiters themselves, by providing works from writers that provide an inside look of the city and its history. The literature of Detroit, in combination with economic and historical studies, can help understand the where the issues originate.

Rashid said the map differs from the  superficial treatment of the city in some current literature. He hopes to inspire viewers to see and think about Detroit in a new way.

Griots and musicians from six villages came to record with Community Voice International in Sare Bidji, Senegal.
Community Voice International

The music of the Keur Daouda Cisse village in Senegal has been recorded for Community Voice International.

They are just one of 10 communities that has been recorded for the organization. It's an Ann Arbor-based group that records music by people who live in struggling villages in Senegal and turns the recordings into profits that go directly back to the community.

The Founder and Executive Director of Community Voice International, David Bleckley, joined us today.

*Listen to the full show above.

Fuddy duddy!

If you use the word ‘fuddy duddy’, young people might just think you are one.

This week on That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan talk about the rise of fashionable words.

After using the word in class, Curzan states that her students had no idea what she was referring to. When she asked whether they knew what she was talking about, only a few students knew what a ‘fuddy duddy’ was.

user blwphotography / Flickr

This week in ArtPod, we look at the "great wave" generation of young adults and children with autism. 

We spent a few days on a film set where those teens and adults are learning job skills, social interaction, and how to walk back on set after a small breakdown. 

Then we visit a children's hospital that's using art –murals, patient portraits and more – to help parents and kids navigate the stressful, chaotic experience. 

You can also check out ArtPod in iTunes.

Rebecca Wilbanks, photo and makeup credit

The“great wave” of kids with autism is growing up.

That’s what experts are calling this generation, since more than 80% of people diagnosed with full spectrum autism are under 21.

In Michigan, about 16,000 kids are eligible for special education services, according to a state report.

But when those kids grow up, the same report says, the state doesn’t have nearly enough services to help them get jobs or transition to adult lives.

That’s why one program in Rochester is giving young adults with autism the skills to get a job in an unusual way: by training them in the movie business.  

Thomas Video opened in 1974, and was the first store in the country to sell films. 

On Stateside, we spoke with Jim Olenski, the owner of Thomas Video about his business and why it's closing. 

According to Olenski, the store has been losing money for a long time, partly because of the rise in online movie streaming options, like Netflix. 

To hear Cynthia Canty's interview with Olenski, click the link above.   

Ryan Basilio / Creative Commons

Leaders of the Catholic Diocese of Kalamazoo are warning parishioners not to take part in an ordination ceremony this weekend, because the person being ordained is a woman.

In a weekly newsletter, Bishop Paul Bradley reminded parishioners who take part that they will be kicked out of the church. Those who witness what he called the “simulation” ceremony must confess before receiving sacraments of the church. The Diocese did not return requests for comment on this story.

Screenshot from YouTube / YouTube

Katie Caralis works in Grand Rapids at the Creative Youth Center. She told her story about her experience in Teach for America at Failure Lab in Grand Rapids in May 2013. 

After Caralis graduated from the University of Michigan, she moved out West to work as a teacher in the TFA program. You can watch her share her experience in the video below. (And you can listen to her story above.)

Image made by Mark Brush

Bad roads, the Rust Belt, the largest city in bankruptcy: These are some of the negative visions that people have of Michigan. 

A recent Gallup Poll showed that only 28% of Michiganders said Michigan was the best or one of the best possible states to live in. 

But you're still here.

Why?

That's the question Michigan Radio is asking as part of our Why I Stay project. 

Mark Brush of Michigan Radio is running it, and he joined us on Stateside. 

*Listen to the full interview above. 

"The Jit" in action.
Detroit OG's / YouTube

It's called The Detroit Jit. It’s a dance style that started as a street dance in Detroit in the 1970s by three brothers who were known as The Jitterbugs.

And now the Jit and The Jitterbugs are the subject of a documentary that will be screened Friday at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Haleem Rasul is the founder of the dance group HardCore Detroit, and the producer of the film "The Jitterbugs: Pioneers of The Jit.”

Here's the trailer:

We welcomed Haleem Rasul to the program today, and one of the founders of The Jitterbugs, Tracy McGhee.

*Listen to the interview above.

Who's up for the next beer run?
Matt Lehrer / Flickr

What happens when a house party is going full tilt and the beer runs out?

Chances are someone goes on a beer run. And chances are that "someone" has had a few drinks.

A new business that's opened in Ann Arbor aims to keep the party going without that "someone" having to get behind the wheel of a car.

DrinkDrivers is a new website and mobile app launched by a group of University of Central Florida grads who decided to make Ann Arbor its second launch location.

DrinkDrivers CEO Jeff Nadel joined us to explain how it works.

*Listen to the interview above.

DJ Psycho / Facebook

Electronic music fans from around the world are getting ready for the Movement Electronic Music Festival that hits downtown Detroit on Memorial Day weekend.

This year's Movement Festival brings more than 100 artists on five outdoor stages at Hart Plaza.

Dezi Magby – aka DJ Psycho of Flint – has played a big part in making Michigan a major player in the world's electronic music scene. He got hooked on electronic music as a fifth-grader, and he's been making music and DJing since 1984.

Another name to watch for at this year's festival is DJ and producer Asher Perkins, who'll be making his first appearance at the Movement Festival.

Perkins and Magby talked to us about what sets Detroit electronic music apart.

Listen to the full interview above.

John H. Riggle / Kristina Riggle

It seems just about every week you can find a news report about a high school teacher being arrested and charged with having sex with a student.

You look at that teacher's mug shot and think to yourself — how does this happen?

Writer Kristina Riggle of Grand Rapids has tackled this very thorny scenario in her newest novel – her fifth. It's called "A Whole Golden World."

Listen to the full interview above.

Casey Clark was a disk jockey at WJR radio Detroit during the mid-1950s.
1966 edition of Music City News / Facebook

When you think of music that's made in Detroit, you certainly think of Motown. There's R&B, gospel, jazz, rock, rap – and there is country.

The Motor City has a rich history of country & western and bluegrass musicians, along with clubs, showrooms, and radio stations that got that music out to an eager public.

Craig Maki tells their story in his new book, "Detroit Country Music: Mountaineers, Cowboys, and Rockabillies,” and he joined us today.

This segment was edited by Crissy Zamarron with Mercedes Mejia. 

*Listen to our interview above.

Morel mushrooms spring from the ground in Michigan.
State of Michigan

Listen to Chef Hermann Suhs cooking up morels in his kitchen at Hermann's European Café in Cadillac, Michigan.

This audio postcard was produced by Tom Carr.

Here's the recipe for "Fettuccine Morello a la Chef Hermann"

Ingredients:

Andrew Kopietz

Writer's residencies are common, but Write A House offers a residency that might only be possible in a city like Detroit. The group renovates vacant houses and gives them away, for free, and forever. 

The unique program has opened up its application process, and in a few months, a panel of judges will select one fiction, nonfiction, or poetry writer to live in the inaugural house. 

Write A House Vice President Sarah Cox told Michigan Radio reporter Kate Wells that they want to draw more literary talent to Detroit.

Many writers get tripped up about when the word “its” has an apostrophe and when it does not.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss the oftentimes confusing placement of the apostrophe.

The word “it’s” with an apostrophe is a contraction of “it is,” just as “can’t” is a contraction of “cannot.” If “its” is referring to the possession of something, no apostrophe is required. The same is true for the pronouns hers, ours and yours.

collage by Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Last Friday, we asked people to share a photo that represents why they stay in Michigan.

So far, people have shared thousands of photos and tweets using the hashtag #whyIstay.

Public radio stations all over the country are asking their communities the same question. Here's a collection showing all the responses.

A 1954 Spartan Royal Manor.
Tin Can Tourists / Pinterest

They call themselves the Tin Can Tourists. They're folks who celebrate the travel trailer – the vintage travel trailers – the kind that grandma and grandpa might have used.

This weekend the Tin Can Tourists are holding their 17th annual gathering at Camp Dearborn in Milford.

Forrest Bone is the head of the Tin Can Tourists. And he told us today that his group actually dates back to 1919.

*Listen to our interview with above.

UM's Ross School of Business.
UM

Words of encouragement, like “think positive,” can be flung around with little thought when we face challenging situations.

It's something we hear so often that it's easy to tune out.

But there is real power in those words: The power to make our workplaces better and more effective.

This week, The Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan is holding its first-ever Ross Positive Business Conference.

Chris White leads the Center for Positive Organizations at the University of Michigan, and he joined us today.

*Listen to our interview with above.

Lester Graham Michigan Radio

It's one of the most authentic urban experiences in the country: Detroit's Eastern Market.

These days, the Eastern Market is a six-block area just east of downtown Detroit, and it's been feeding people since 1891.

But there's a much longer history of public markets in Detroit. We spoke with food historian Bill Loomis, who wrote about this for Michigan History Magazine.

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