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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Detroit Bike City Kendra / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Detroit's popular weekly Slow Roll bike ride was canceled for the second week in a row due to competing events.

A Nation Engaged: Fireworks

Oct 14, 2016
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

 

America is changing.

Non-white kids now make up a majority of kindergartners. By the next presidential election, the Census Bureau predicts the majority of all children will be children of color.

And by 2044, no one racial group will be a majority in the country.

This cross-current of demographic and cultural change is upending traditional voting patterns and straining the fabric of what it means to be American.

The Apple Business cocktail mixes apple cider with gin. You won't believe how well it works.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

"October is my favorite month," Tammy Coxen of Tammy's Tastings said. "Do you know why? Apple cider!"

Apple cider is a popular ingredient in a lot of cocktails which seem perfect for fall. Often the cider is mixed with bourbon or rum. But this cocktail, the Apple Business, is made with gin.

"I chose Ann Arbor Distilling's Water Hill gin for this drink because of of the spicy garam masala note," Coxen said.

The distiller's website indicates the botanicals used to flavor the gin include Croatian juniper, cardamom, and garam masala.

Text like a teen: Drop the period!!!

Oct 14, 2016
Ann Curzan explained that things like punctuation and emojis are used to make up for the lack of conversational context in texting.
Public Domain / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Texting has become a dominant means of communication in today’s interconnected world.

Some reports suggest that large swaths of Americans prefer it to talking on their phone.

If you count yourself among the 97% of Americans who send at least one text every day, it might be time to take another look at your texting etiquette. According to University of Michigan English professor Anne Curzan, there’s a chance you’re doing it all wrong.

A Nation Engaged: Death of a Nation

Oct 13, 2016
JUSTIN ROGERS / INSIDEOUT LITERARY ARTS PROJECT

Throughout this election season, NPR and its member stations have been having a national conversation called "A Nation Engaged." The project has looked at central themes in this year's election, including this week's question:

What does it actually mean to be American?

We put this question to some promising young spoken word artists, and we'll be sharing their poems with you all week.

This is a poem entitled Death of a Nation by Marrim Al-akashi, a graduate of Fordson High School. 

Carleton Gholz, founder and Executive Director of the Detroit Sound Conservancy.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

 


There’s no arguing that Detroit has a rich and diverse musical heritage.

There’s also no arguing that Detroit has had its challenges in preserving its history and heritage.

That’s why the Detroit Sound Conservancy came to be.

Its mission is to support Detroit’s musical heritage through advocacy, conservation, and education.

This Saturday the DSC is holding its 3rd Annual Music Conference, free and open to the public.

Devin Pedde

 

A new season, a new host for A Prairie Home Companion.

After 42 years, Garrison Keillor has retired. He chose his first successor, who will bring us his very first show this Saturday night, live from The Fitzgerald Theatre in St. Paul, Minnesota.

He’s a mandolin virtuoso, he’s won many Grammys, and he leads the Punch Brothers.

Menachem Kaiser / Michigan Radio

Today is Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It’s the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. Many Jews spend the day praying and fasting, seeking forgiveness from God and fellow man.

In the days leading up to Yom Kippur, some observant Jews perform kapparot, a ritual involving live chickens.

Each person swings a chicken over their head and says a prayer. Afterward, the chickens are taken elsewhere to be processed and donated as food for those who need it.

A Nation Engaged: The Land of the Free

Oct 12, 2016
Justin Rogers / InsideOut Literary Arts Project

Throughout this election season, NPR and its member stations have been having a national conversation called "A Nation Engaged." The project has looked at central themes in this year's election, including this week's question:

What does it actually mean to be American?

We put this question to some promising young spoken word artists, and we'll be sharing their poems with you all week.

Today, we bring you a poem entitled The Land of the Free by LéAndra Gregory, a student and Citywide Poet at Detroit Schools of the Arts. 

A Nation Engaged: Kitchen, After Rumi's Guest House

Oct 11, 2016
Kyndall Flowers
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Throughout this election season, NPR and its member stations have been having a collective national conversation called “A Nation Engaged.”  The project has looked at central themes in this year’s election, including this week’s question:

What does it mean to be American?

A Nation Engaged: Apology to My Father

Oct 10, 2016
Sakila Islam
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Throughout this election season, NPR and its member stations have been having a national conversation called "A Nation Engaged." The project has looked at central themes in this year's election, including this week's question:

What does it actually mean to be American?

We put this question to some promising young spoken word artists, and we'll be sharing their poems with you all week. 

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II
Public Domain

 

Broadway musicals have covered a dizzying array of subjects. It may be hard to believe, but that list includes the life and trials of a young physician.

On this evening, 69 years ago, the medical musical "Allegro" opened on Broadway.

Although it’s long been forgotten, University of Michigan medical historian Dr. Howard Markel believes the lessons taught by "Allegro" are worth remembering today.

people at sculpture exhibit
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

A collection of carved wooden dogs received the most votes in this year’s ArtPrize. James Mellick, a craftsman from Ohio, takes home $200,000 for Wounded Warrior Dogs.

According to the artists’ statement, Mellick hopes the installation at the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel raises awareness of wounded veterans.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This is part of an ongoing series on Stateside called Artisans of Michigan.

We are at Voodoo Choppers in Aurburn Hills to talk with Eric Gorges. If that name is familiar to you, you know he’s also host of the weekly national TV show on PBS, A Craftsman’s Legacy. But, we’re here chiefly to talk about his craft: building motorcycles.

Courtesy of Ran Ortner Studio

As the Grand Rapids Artprize competition continues to grow and evolve, Stateside’s Lester Graham sat down with the very first winner of the competition, painter Ran Ortner.

Mary Whalen

After three years of writing, arranging and recording, Red Tail Ring’s Michael Beauchamp and Laurel Premo are out with their new album.

It’s called Fall Away Blues. It blends new folk songs on subjects ranging from gun violence and fracking to our deepest relationships and changing sense of place. It also features some old traditional ballads and tunes.

Wayne State University Press

Many women can relate to the witching hour. In the middle of the night, you wake up and have trouble falling back to sleep because your mind is racing. Concerns about the upcoming day, anxiety about the mounting to-do list while, oftentimes, your partner sleeps soundly next to you. The Witching Hour is the title of the first story in a collection of “flash fiction” – not short stories – by Detroit-based writer Desiree Cooper, titled Know The Mother.

Max Nussenbaum is the CEO of Castle, a company looking to make property management simpler and more efficient
Courtesy of Generation Startup

What's the barrier between you and the life you truly want to lead?

That's one of the questions Cheryl Miller Houser explores as co-director of the documentary film Generation Startup.

It follows some young entrepreneurs as they build startups in Detroit. They try, stumble, learn, and try again.

Vial told us his new album was recorded over the course of three days in a cabin in northern Michigan.
Jay Jylkka

 


It isn’t often you hear of an aspiring musician being encouraged to give up their day job - you know, the one that pays - and plunge head first into that musical career.

But Ann Arbor-based singer-songwriter Mike Vial was given that push as sort of a wedding gift from his wife Natalie Burg. She told him she wouldn’t marry him unless he quit his job as a teacher to follow his musical dreams.

That was five years ago. Since then, Vial has played hundreds of gigs across the United States and Canada.

Now he’s out with his fourth release: A World That’s Bigger.

What gives you solace?

Maybe it's a hot cup of tea and a good book. Maybe it's a stroll through the woods on an autumn day.

Or maybe it's cat videos. Lots of cat videos.  

What gives us solace is knowing that we have thoughtful, curious listeners who send us great questions, including one from a listener who wanted to know if "solace" can be modified by "some"?

That is, can you take some solace or do you have to take it all?


Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

“I was listening to Michigan Radio and I heard about this beer tax being debated,” Tammy Coxen of Tammy’s Tastings said as she poured rye into a stainless steel mixing cup for a cocktail. “That tax has a little bit to do with the cocktail I chose today,” Coxen said.

It’s called the sawbuck, which is an antiquated term for a ten dollar bill. If the bill passes, ten dollars would not quite cover the increased tax on a keg of beer.

Contemporary opera premieres in the Upper Peninsula

Sep 30, 2016
JACQUES-ALAIN FINKELTROC

Last summer, we met Eugene Birman and Scott Diel on an island in the middle of Lake Superior. They were working on their newest opera called State of the Union.

With almost everything Birman and Diel have attempted to do, they've tried to ask themselves, "Why does it have to be this way? Can it be different?"

Eugene Birman says in most cases, other people have responded, "Well, yeah, I guess it can be.”

Photos: The River Street Anthology

Sep 30, 2016
Doug Coombe

Ypsilanti songwriter Matt Jones’ extensive River Street Anthology of Michigan music had very humble beginnings. Inspired by Saturday Looks Good to Me front man Fred Thomas’ 2006 Ypsilanti compilation, Jones set out to do a Volume 2.

Within an hour after making a Facebook post seeking musicians on February 6, 2015, his little 10 to 15 person compilation quickly had more than 60 artists lined up.

Cemetery graves overgrown with weeds.
Amy Goldman / Friends of B'nai David Cemetery

If you drive Van Dyke on Detroit’s east side, you could easily miss B’nai David Cemetery. It sits on a little hill up off the road, its rows of 1,300 plots tightly spaced.

The gravestones are carved in Hebrew, Yiddish and English. Some look like tree trunks that have been cut short, symbols of lives that ended too soon.

A few years ago, you wouldn’t even have been able to see some of the stones. The weeds had grown tall. Urns had been stolen. Some of the headstones toppled.

Courtesy of Barney Ales

 

You’ve surely heard many stories about Motown over the years. Stories of its stars or of the ambitious Berry Gordy Jr. using an $800 family loan to build one of the most impactful record labels anywhere.

But there’s a side to the Motown story we haven’t heard much about until now: the business side. The entrepreneurial spirit, the hard work and the hustle to “get the records played and the company paid.”

Sam Kadi

For most of us, our view of the bloody civil war in Syria is limited to snippets of video seen on network or cable news.

But a new documentary film gives us a staggering inside view of the Syrian Revolution.

Hystopia, the first novel of acclaimed Michigan short story writer David Means, is a complex book built around a simple question: what can we do about the trauma that war inflicts on our veterans?  

“We’re profiting off of it,” Ramsdell said. “The minerals are going into the products that we’re living off of and benefiting off of, and the Congolese people are left with a country that has been wracked with war for almost 20-plus years.”
screengrab of When Elephants Fight

 

A country that is one of the most mineral-rich in the world is also one of the world's poorest nations.

The Democratic Republic of Congo has been rocked by war in recent years, and although the war is over, the conflict and suffering have yet to end.

A Michigan-based filmmaker is out with a new exploration of how the minerals in our electronic devices are funding the turmoil in that African country.

A few weeks ago, a tweet went viral, because it explained something about adjectives that many people didn’t realize they already knew.

 

Think about how you would describe someone’s eyes.

 

Would you describe them as “blue beautiful big eyes"? Probably not. That sounds weird, right?


Courtesy of Zarinah El-Amin Naeem

 

This coming Sunday brings the fourth annual Headwrap Expo & Fashion Show in Dearborn.

It will feature head wraps from a wide array of cultural and spiritual perspectives.

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