Arts & Culture

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Black female comedians are receiving more attention

Satori Shakoor
Twitter

A new face recently joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live" and made plenty of headlines when she did.

Comic Sasheer Zamata became the first black female cast member of SNL in five years, since the departure of Maya Rudolph. She was discovered through a talent search that focused strictly on black female comedians.

What does this extra attention mean for other black women who want to make us laugh?

One of those women is Detroiter Satori Shakoor, actor, writer, comedian and creator of "The Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers." She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
10:17 am
Tue February 11, 2014

What does your winter look like on Instagram?

Clearing a pond for ice skating in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Mark Brush Michigan Radio

What does your winter look like?

Bonfires, snowsuits, and a ton of really spicy food to keep warm? Maybe it's something less picturesque, like wearing long underwear and four pairs of socks. 

We are asking listeners across the country (and around the world) to show us what winter looks like.

Michigan Radio is joining Southern California Public Radio (@KPCC on Instagram) and NPR (@NPR) as a contributing member station to the Public Square project. Check out previous themes for the project here

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Fun words for 2014 Winter Olympics

The acronym YOLO has gotten a new lease on life with the "YOLO flip."

This week on That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan reveal words to know for the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.   

YOLO, an acronym that means “you only live once,” was popularized in 2011. Now the acronym has taken on a new meaning with the YOLO flip, a snowboarding term for the “cab double cork 1440.”

Swiss snowboarder Iouri Podladtchikov, also known as I-Pod, named the move after landing it at the 2013 X-Games.

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Arts & Culture
12:09 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

A rare Spanish painting rediscovered in Michigan now on display at the DIA

“The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness,” post-conservation treatment.
Detroit Institute of Arts Detroit Institute of Arts

A 17th century painting recently discovered in suburban Detroit is now on display at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

DIA Executive Director of Collection Strategies and Information Salvador Salort-Pons spotted “The Infant Saint John the Baptist in the Wilderness,” a painting by Spanish artist Bartolome Esteban Murillo last year while lecturing at Meadow Brook Hall in Rochester.

The painting, which experts date to 1670, was purchased by Alfred and Matilda Wilson – the original owners of Meadow Brook Hall – in 1926. Matilda, the widow of Dodge co-founder John Francis Dodge, was a big art collector. She also co-founded the Oakland campus of Michigan State University, which is now Oakland University.

As part of a deal with OU, DIA conservators allowed art students at the university to get a rare glimpse of the entire conservation process. Though the museum often brings in high-school and college students, it's not often a group gets to watch a treatment from start to finish.

"Students were able to follow a full treatment and do this in more depth," Alfred Ackerman said, head of conservation at the museum. 

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Arts & Culture
10:54 am
Fri February 7, 2014

A project hopes to give away rehabbed houses in Detroit to aspiring writers

"The Apple House"
Andrew Kopietz

If we could transport ourselves back to Detroit at its prime, we might barely recognize the city: The streets bustled with a population of nearly two million, lights shone in the storefronts, and the neighborhoods were full.

Here how Detroit looked in the 1920s:

Today, the story is well known.

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Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

New art series presents abortion and contraception as part of human history

4000 Years for Choice exhibit in the Lane Hall Gallery.
Facebook

Can art and history change the tone of the conversation in the pro-choice movement?

Artist and activist Heather Ault believes they can.

Heather is the founder of 4000 Years for Choice. She's created an art series that presents abortion and contraception as a part of human history, a history of women seeking to control their reproduction.

Her posters are currently on exhibit at the Lane Hall Gallery on the University of Michigan campus.

Heather Ault joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:33 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Jerry Sprague quits his job and follows his passion to play music

Jerry Sprague with his grandsons.
Facebook

In 1985 Jerry Sprague quit his job and decided to follow his passion. That passion is music.

But, Sprague isn’t the only person in his family with that passion.

He’s is in a band with his grandsons.

*Listen to the interview above.

That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Wacky weather words

Maybe polar vortex has not been a welcome addition to all of our vocabularies, but there are some other great weather words out there.

In this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss regional words to describe the weather.

Depending on where we live, we use different names for a "light snow." According to the Dictionary of American Regional English, some speakers call this a skiff or a skift. However, in the Midwest and on the East Coast, people are more likely to use the terms dusting or flurry.

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Arts & Culture
10:03 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Listen to music from the whole Ann Arbor Folk Festival line up

Hill Auditorium is where the Ann Arbor Folk Festival is happening this weekend
user: Eamonn Flickr

The Ark started the Ann Arbor Folk Festival  in 1977. In nearly all of the past lineups, you'll find big names and local artists.

The festival is happening this weekend at Hill Auditorium. Both the Friday and Saturday shows are sold out. 

So, if you didn't get tickets in time, or you can't afford them, or the roads are too bad, or you had no idea that this existed, or you are lazy, you can listen to all the artists here. 

(I've constructed this list based on the list the Ark released, which they say is subject to change.)

Here's what you can hear on Friday:

Pearl and the Beard

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Songs from Studio East
4:43 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

The Appleseed Collective visits the studios of Michigan Radio

The Appleseed Collective stops by Michigan Radio.

The 37th Ann Arbor Folk Festival kicks off this Friday. This year’s celebrated national acts include artists like Iron and Wine, and Neko Case. But the festival also features local bands. 

One band is The Appleseed Collective, based in Ann Arbor.

As part of Michigan Radio's Songs from Studio East, Stateside’s Mercedes Mejia sat down with the group to talk about their new album "Young Love" and hear a live studio performance.

Stateside-Failure:Lab
3:34 pm
Wed January 29, 2014

Poet shares her story of failure, losing a son

Jessica Care Moore telling her story of failure.
Failure-Lab YouTube

The audio for Jessica Care Moore's Failure:Lab story

Jessica Care Moore is an internationally renowned poet, publisher, activist, playwright, and frankly a flat-out rock star.

She is a five-time "Showtime at the Apollo" winner and has been featured on the album "Nastradamus" as well as Def Poetry Jam.

This is the story that Jessica shared at Failure:Lab Detroit on Nov. 21, 2013, at the Detroit Opera House.

Arts & Culture
6:07 am
Mon January 27, 2014

After cutting arts teachers, schools adjust to new normal in Lansing

Lansing elementary students lost their art and music specialists last year.
Navy Hale Keiki School flickr.com

Hear what art class is like...after the art teachers are gone.

Last year, Lansing public school officials laid off all their elementary art and music teachers.

The move got national attention from outraged educators and arts groups.

Now, almost a year after the layoffs were announced, Lansing students and teachers are getting used to the new normal.

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun January 26, 2014

The ‘that,’ ‘who,’ ‘which’ dilemma

The pronoun who is for people and the pronoun that is for things, except when it’s the other way around.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan discuss the confusing usage of who, that, and which.

Students are often taught that is for inanimate objects while who is for people. However, standard grammar books allow some variation on this rule.

In fact, the word that has referred to people for hundreds of years.

“You can go back to early translations of the Lord’s Prayer” Cruzan describes. “You will get ‘Our father, thou that art in heaven.” In this example, that refers to a person.

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Stateside
4:00 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

New documentary covers the history of the Underground Railroad in Michigan

A still from Madman or Martyr.
Facebook

It's commonly accepted that the American Civil War began with the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in South Carolina on April 12, 1861.

But some make a case for the start of the Civil War being the October 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry by abolitionist John Brown. It was his failed attempt to spark an armed slave revolt and it ended with John Brown being hanged for treason in December 1859.

The story of John Brown, the abolitionist movement and the Underground Railroad in Detroit is the subject of a new documentary called "Madman or Martyr."

The documentary will premiere on Jan. 31 at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit.

Filmmaker and actor Luke Jaden produced "Madman or Martyr." Jaden is from Clarkston in Oakland County and he is 17 years old.

Carol Mull is a founding member of the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission, an author and scholar of Underground Railroad history in Michigan.

They both joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:05 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Preserving today's digital record for future generations

SpecialKRB / flickr

Think, for just a moment, of the many ways we capture moments of our lives and share them with everyone.

Snap a photo on your smartphone and in seconds, it's up on Twitter or Facebook or Instagram for friends, family and followers to see.

But what is going to happen to those moments and memories someday in the future when Instagram or Tumblr or Facebook or Flickr no longer exist?

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Culture
3:52 pm
Mon January 20, 2014

Martin Luther King Jr.'s forgotten visit to the University of Michigan's campus

Martin Luther King speaking at UM's Hill Auditorium in 1962.
Bentley Historical Library

The University of Michigan celebrates the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. by holding annual symposiums on campus.

But it seems no one knew of King’s visit to campus in 1962 until an enterprising person at the Bentley Historical Library combed through their collection.

The Michigan Daily picks up the story from here (Haley Goldberg wrote about the discovery in 2012):

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That's What They Say
8:05 am
Sun January 19, 2014

Homing in on ‘comprise’

If the whole comprises the parts, it seems like the parts should not be able to comprise the whole.

This week on That’s What They Say, Host Rina Miller and University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan take on the verb comprise used to mean compose.

In the 15th century, comprise meant “to seize” or “to comprehend.” From there, comprise took on the definition “to include.” With this meaning, a big part comprises smaller parts.

However, by the 18th century, comprise also meant compose, allowing small things to comprise a larger thing. Ever since this change, the two words have often been used interchangeably.

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Arts & Culture
6:12 am
Fri January 17, 2014

Why images of strangers make us feel less alone

A photo from Humans of Ann Arbor's Facebook page. It has 4,380 likes.
Susan K. Campbell

Full audio's above, if you really want to feel the awkwardness, and awesomeness, of asking strangers if you can take their picture.

If you’re walking around Ann Arbor or Detroit these days, you should know:  a total stranger may come up and ask to take your picture.

They’ll snap a few shots. Maybe ask how your day is going.

Then they’ll post it all on Facebook. And hundreds, possibly even thousands of people will see it.

That’s because two photographers – one in each city – are building a growing fan base around these daily street photos.

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Arts & Culture
5:30 pm
Wed January 15, 2014

DIA helps us correct errors in an earlier broadcast

Flickr

Yesterday, on Michigan Radio, we discussed the news that a group of philanthropists and foundations have raised more than $300 million to try to save works from the Detroit Institute of Arts and protect city worker pensions.

However, in the course of our conversation, we had a couple errors.

AnneMarie Erickson is the Chief Operating Officer of the Detroit Institute of Arts and she joined us to help clarify the situation.

*Listen to the audio above.

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Stateside
4:51 pm
Tue January 14, 2014

Ann Arbor father seeks respect for all dads in America

Father and son.
Flickr user dadblunders Flickr

How about some respect for dads, everyone?

How about we stop with the marketing and entertainment cliches portraying Dad as a big ol' doofus who can't boil a pot of water or change a nasty diaper? And we start recognizing that men play a very active role in the home life and they are not the opposite side of the coin to the "supermommy."

This has been the mission of our next guest. Doug French been one of the nation's leading "daddy bloggers" ever since launching his blog "Laid Off Dad" over 10 years ago. And in July 2010, he created another blog, When the Flames Go Up, blogging with his ex-wife about co-parenting after divorce.

He's also the co-founder of the upcoming Dad 2.0 Summit, which aims to raise the profile of America's dads in the eyes of companies and marketers.

He does all of this as he practices the fine art of being a dad.

Doug French joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

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