Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

When an adjective already has an “ly” ending, how do we make it into an adverb without turning it into a tongue twister?

University of Michigan English Professor Ann Curzan has a colleague whose interest has been piqued by this conundrum, so she decided to look into it.

cover of novel
Lev Raphael

Peace and quiet is in short supply for Nick Hoffman, the composition professor at the fictional "State University of Michigan," in the town of Michiganapolis. A mind-blowing encounter with the local police starts the action in the latest book from writer Lev Raphael.

Raphael has now written 25 books in many different genres. His latest, Assault with a Deadly Lie, is the eighth installment of his Nick Hoffman Mysteries.

Lev Raphael also teaches creative writing, popular literature and Jewish-American literature at Michigan State University.

grosse point lighthouse
Flickr user Teemu008 / flickr

West Michigan historian Larry B. Massie's book Blue Water, Red Metal & Green Gold: The Color of Michigan's Past includes 27 colorful human interest stories from Michigan's past, ranging from the 1800s to the 1950s

It is the 12th in his series Voyages into Michigan's Past, and his 21st book.

Traverse city vineyard
Flickr user Rachel Kramer / Flickr

The Traverse City area is emerging as Michigan's new "foodie empire." Chris Cook, chief wine and restaurant critic for Hour Detroit Magazine, tells us just which area restaurants are worth a visit.

Part of the Diego Rivera mural in the DIA. Foundations pulled together to help save the art in the museum.
Joseph Gallegos / Flickr

  

Graham Beal will retire from his position as the director of the Detroit Institute of Arts at the end of July. 

His 16-year tenure saw the museum through the financial crash in 2008 and the city's bankruptcy. 

"We did indeed get tremendous support," Beal said, "but none of that would have happened had we not been a thriving institution that had positioned itself as being for the people."

user: Allert Aalders / flickr

One of the most iconic rock venues in Detroit will be seeing a big transformation in the coming months -- The Magic Stick, on the second floor of the Majestic entertainment complex on Woodward, will turn its back on its rock roots for electronic music, the Detroit Free Press reports
 

Tianyi Cheng

Chances are good most of us have heard of the Kiwanis Club. The name is unusual.

But you might not know the Kiwanis club started just about 100 years ago in Detroit.

We spoke with Eric Sabree, president of Kiwanis 1, the Detroit club that started it all in January 1915.

Abigail Stauffer has a new album out this week called Where I'm Going. There's an album release show on Thursday at the Ark, in Ann Arbor.  

Certainly the reading clerk and deputy clerk of the Crown would approve of us bringing these words back.
UK Parliament / Flickr

Every year, the Word Warriors of Wayne State University come out with a list of the top 10 words that deserve to be spoken and written more often.

Chris Williams is with Wayne State University in Detroit and he joined us today.

You can listen to our conversation with him below.

Bill Workinger / Voice of America

One of the world's most extensive and valuable collections of African music has come to the University of Michigan.

Mike Blank

After graduating from Michigan State in 2010, Connor McGaffey of Troy couldn't land a full-time job. But, a chance encounter with foam dart guns uncorked a business idea: find an affordable place to let groups come and play with those soft darts.

Photo courtesy of Brit Bennett

More than a million people know how Brit Bennett feels about being black in nice little liberal enclaves of progressive white people.

Basically, confused. And grateful. And more than a little tired.

End all, be all ... be all, end all: The ordering of this phrase appears to have become a bit of a free for all.

A That's What They Say listener wanted to know why we appear to be turning this expression around, so University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan did some investigating.

Wikimedia

Jim Harbaugh will be the next coach of the University of Michigan football team.

UM Interim Athletic Director Jim Hackett made the announcement at a packed press conference in Ann Arbor.

Harbaugh will be paid roughly $5 million a year, plus incentives, over an eight-year contract.

"Hoi polloi" is one of those words that's just fun to say. But some of us may be confused about what the word  means.

University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan  says "hoi polloi" came into English from Greek in the 17th century.

"It refers to the masses, or the majority, but I think there's something happening where you're starting to see some people use it to refer to the elite," Curzan says. 

She consulted the Corpus of Contemporary American English, which shows current usage. 

Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

HARBOR SPRINGS, Mich. (AP) - An anonymous donor has helped a northern Michigan conservancy buy a large, undeveloped stretch of Lake Michigan shoreline.

The Petoskey News-Review reports this week that the Little Traverse Conservancy has closed on the deal that includes roughly 2,400 feet of shoreline between Harbor Springs and Cross Village in the northwestern Lower Peninsula.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The “snaketivity” scene decorating Michigan’s state capitol this holiday season has raised some eyebrows — and questions about the group behind it.

That group calls itself the Detroit Satanic Temple, and it just formed a few months ago.

Temple director Jex Blackmore says the display is meant to promote Satanic practices and beliefs, but those aren’t what many people think.

Emily Fox / Michigan Radio

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The Seth Rogen comedy that ticked off North Korea is being released today in some 300 independent theaters in the U.S.    

Theaters in Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo, Traverse City and Ironwood will be among those screening the controversial movie "The Interview."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

BLISSFIELD, Mich. (AP) - A former canning company site in southeastern Michigan has been selected as the future home of an agricultural history museum.

  The Daily Telegram of Adrian reports that the Blissfield Village Council approved leasing land to the Agricultural Awareness & Preservation Museum board of directors.

Third Coast Kings

The Third Coast Kings is a seven member funk and soul band from Ann Arbor.

Sean Ike is the front man of the band. When he’s on stage, he commands your attention. You will almost always see him jumping and dancing around his microphone, dressed in a brightly colored suit, shooting deep stares to the audience and occasionally wiping the sweat that drips off his shaved head with a hand towel he keeps nearby.  

“If you give us five or six songs, if you are at least not tapping your foot, they should check your pulse or we’re doing it wrong,” Ike says.

Not only do the Third Coast Kings draw people to the dance floor across Michigan, they also have a large following in Japan.

 

Curfews have always been about keeping us safe. What has changed is what we’re being kept safe from.

University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan says the word "curfew" has a long history that goes back to fire.

"The word first comes into English in the 14th century from Anglo-Norman, and the root of it is the word 'cover' and the word 'fire,'" Curzan says. "And for people who know French, 'couvrir' and 'feu' –  and that gives us curfew."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Before dawn this morning, five Satanists erected what they call a "snaketivity" on the east lawn of the state Capitol.

A fake snake coils its body around the display, which features the phrase “The Greatest Gift is Knowledge.”

Jex Blackmore is with the Satanic Temple of Detroit. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This holiday season, two very different religious beliefs will be on display at the state Capitol in Lansing.

A small crowd sang Christmas carols outside the state Capitol today. They were there to see a small nativity scene erected. The figures of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph will stand in stark contrast to a display featuring a snake that Michigan Satanists plan to put up on Sunday. 

Billy Strings and Don Julin

If you haven't heard of Don Julin and Billy Strings, then you probably haven't been hanging around Traverse City. 

Priscilla and Larry Massie

If you're dashing around trying to take care of your holiday to-do list, it might be time to think back and remember a time in Michigan when a bowl of oyster stew was your Christmas dinner and a $1.75 pair of gloves took care of your Christmas gift for the wife!

Ali Lapetina / Michigan Radio Detroit Journalism Cooperative

One thing that strikes us about Detroit – as the city teetered on the brink of insolvency, then entered Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, and finally, last week, officially emerged from bankruptcy – is that life in the Motor City goes on.

We asked photographer Ali Lapetina to take her camera all over the city in a single day, and shoot pictures from before sunrise until after sunset. What she captured is exactly that: the life that keeps beating in Michigan's oldest and biggest and most complicated city.

Here are some of the people who remain in Detroit after the bankruptcy is over, and will be part of its future.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A plan to shrink the size of the Carriage Town historic district in Flint is running into opposition from people who live in the neighborhood.

Carriage Town is located just across the Flint River from the city’s downtown core. It’s a mix of neatly restored, large single-family homes and blighted buildings.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The nearly $10 million renovation of the Cascades Falls in Jackson begins Monday.

The colorful fountains were built during the height of the Great Depression. The Falls was the brainchild of William Sparks, who made a fortune from car horns and radios. The Falls is modeled on a fountain in Barcelona, Spain. 

Those little questions we ask at the end of sentences to confirm what we already know are called "tag" questions – because they tag onto the end of a sentence to turn it into a little question at the end.

It could be something like, "You can speak Chinese, can't you," where you get that little confirmation question at the end.

University of Michigan English Professor Anne Curzan says we also get invariant tags, like "You can speak Chinese, right?"

Curzan says the tag "right" shows up in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1939.

Sander Rabinowitz

Bill Bonds, an iconic Detroit broadcaster who also worked for ABC stations in New York and Los Angeles, has died.

His longtime employer, WXYZ-TV, reported that the former reporter and anchor died Saturday after suffering a heart attack.

Bonds had worked for the ABC affiliate from 1963 to 1968, then returned in 1971. The station terminated Bonds' multi-year contract in 1995 following a drunken driving arrest.

Born in 1933, Bonds was inducted in 2010 into the Michigan Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. Last year, the Michigan chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences presented him with an award in recognition of his long WXYZ career.

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