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Bernie Sanders

group of activists
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

More than 3,000 progressive activists are expected to be in Detroit later this month for the Women’s Convention.

Many of them will receive an education on Flint’s and Detroit’s water issues.

Groups from Flint and Detroit plan to host a workshop for  conventioneers on the eve of the weekend-long event.

Michiganders rally at Macomb Community College in Warren to save the Affordable Care Act.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Thousands of Michigan residents showed up to a healthcare rally to show Republican leaders they don’t want the Affordable Care Act to be repealed.

Senator Bernie Sanders, along Democrats with Gary Peters and Debbie Stabenow enthused the crowd at Macomb Community College in Warren about fighting to keep their health coverage.

While the Republicans in Washington D.C. have already begun plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Democratic leaders say without a replacement plan, about 30 million Americans would lose their health coverage.

There is less than a week before Michigan voters go to the polls.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

High-profile allies for the Clinton and Trump campaigns will be in Michigan Wednesday. 

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-VT, will be stumping for votes for Democrat Hillary Clinton in Kalamazoo and Traverse City. Clinton will need Sanders' supporters. They gave him the win in Michigan’s presidential primary earlier this year.

Donald Trump Jr. has stops planned at college campuses in East Lansing and Allendale.  His sister, Ivanka will be meeting with a businesswomen's group in Troy on Wednesday evening.  

senator bernie sanders at podium
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Public Radio Network

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders was in Michigan Thursday to campaign for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

He crisscrossed the state with stops in Dearborn, Ann Arbor, East Lansing and Grand Rapids.

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty (left) interviews Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) with Stateside Executive Producer Joe Linstroth in Ann Arbor on October 6, 2016.
Mitchell Rivard

Republicans and Democrats have made it clear that the state of Michigan is in play for the 2016 presidential election.

Another high-profile campaign visit to the state comes in the form of Vermont senator Bernie Sanders. He is making stops in four cities (Dearborn, Ann Arbor, East Lansing, Grand Rapids) stumping for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders will be in Michigan tomorrow urging voters to elect Hillary Clinton and defeat Donald Trump. 

The Clinton campaign says Sanders will talk about how Secretary Clinton's economic plan will work for everyone, and how Donald Trump's plan will instead benefit the very wealthy.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Democrats will hold their state party convention in Lansing on Saturday.

This weekend’s convention may end up reflecting former presidential candidate’s Bernie Sanders' policies as much as party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s state Democratic Party says his party is largely unified coming out of this week’s Democratic National Convention.

State chairman Brandon Dillon spent a lot of time during the four-day convention trying to calm and cajole Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters in Michigan’s delegation, not always successfully.

Still, Dillon says the news media has overstated the number of Sanders backers who plan to bolt the Democratic Party.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

On the final day of the Democratic National Convention, U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders met with Michigan delegates, where he talked about Flint water and Donald Trump.

The crowd in the overflowing hotel ballroom started chanting his name before Bernie Sanders entered.

Sanders delegates and supporters had front row seats and cheered the former presidential candidate several times, though not when he talked about the need to vote for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

The Vermont Senator touched on a few Michigan issues.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The division between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Michigan’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention is getting noticed.

Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison half-jokingly asked, “Am I in the middle of something?” when several Michigan delegates started arguing in the middle of his speech to the delegation this morning.

Sanders delegates, complaining about the treatment of their candidate by the DNC, and Clinton delegates, growing tired of hearing complaints from Sanders delegates, have grown increasing at odds. 

Michigan helped put Hillary Clinton over the top last night, officially making her the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee.

“The next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton,” U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow said as she delivered Michigan’s official vote at the Democratic National Convention. 

Stabenow says she was overcome by emotion seeing her party choose the first woman to be a major party presidential nominee.   

Clinton delegate Sunny Sahu expects now the divisions within the party can heal.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Governor Jennifer Granholm says tonight’s roll call vote will give Bernie Sanders supporters a chance to heal.

Sanders delegates booed the mention of Hillary Clinton’s name during the first day of the Democratic National Convention.

Granholm says the Sanders supporters are dealing with a type of grief one gets when, after passionately backing a candidate, you must deal with their losing the election.  

“They got to take some time to be able to absorb that and see it turn,” Granholm told reporters.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s Democratic Party is asking his delegates to not boo speakers at tonight’s Democratic National Convention.

Monday, it seemed whenever Bernie Sanders supporters were booing DNC speakers, television networks panned over to the Michigan delegation. 

Sanders supporters in the Michigan delegation defaced pro-Hillary Clinton signs and heartily booed the mention of her name.

This morning, as the delegation sat down to breakfast, Michigan State Party Chairman Brandon Dillon asked the delegates to be more respectful tonight. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tammie Lewis sat in her seat crying as Bernie Sanders finished his speech to the Democratic National Convention last night. Sanders spoke about what the campaign had achieved. Lewis could only think of what she has lost.

“I’m just upset,” Lewis said as tears streamed down her cheeks, “Nothing’s going to change.  He was my only hope."

Other Bernie Sanders delegates from Michigan sat stone-faced as their candidate extolled the virtues of Hillary Clinton.  

Melissa Arab stood holding a pro-Hillary sign she had altered to read STOP HER.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz needed to resign her job. 

Revelations that the DNC under Wasserman-Schultz’ leadership tried to undermine Bernie Sanders’ campaign led to her announcement Sunday to step down.

Dingell says Wasserman-Schultz is a friend, but the Florida congresswoman had to go.

Eight years ago, I was writing an article, and called Senator Bernie Sanders’ office for some information. The senator himself called back a couple hours later, and talked to me for 15 minutes or so.

He wasn’t nationally famous then; he was a political independent from a state with half the population of Michigan’s Oakland County.

You could have made a lot of money in Las Vegas a year ago had you bet on him to win this year’s Democratic primary in Michigan.

But win it he did.

Presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, left, and Bernie Sanders, right.
berniesanders.com/hillaryclinton.com

Depending on who you ask, referring to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee is either obvious or massively premature.

The point of contention?

Members of the Democratic National Committee who will serve as unbound delegates at the upcoming Democratic National Convention.

Bernie Sanders speaking in Traverse City, Michigan.
Todd Church / Flickr

He may have won Michigan's Democratic primary in March, but now Sanders’ campaign wants to make sure the delegates he won, actually stick with him.

“We need to ensure delegates committing to Bernie are 100% committed Bernie supporters who will not change their vote during the second or third rounds of voting at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July,” an email sent Tuesday from the Michigan for Bernie campaign states.

“We need you to join the Michigan Democratic Party so you can be a member before the April 21st deadline.”

Arab American Institute

Arab American voters seem to have played a vital role in handing Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders an upset victory in Tuesday’s Democratic presidential primary.

The results show Sanders won in handily in many precincts with large Arab-American populations, particularly in the city of Dearborn.

Donald Trump in Warren and Bernie Sanders in Traverse City.
Photos by Jake Neher from MPRN (left), Todd Church from Flickr / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The official vote totals are still not quite finalized, but it was a shocking – some are saying historic – night for the Democrats in the Michigan Primary. Donald Trump continued to hold serve on the Republican side, winning the Great Lakes State by a comfortable margin, but it was Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ win over Hillary Clinton that dominated the headlines on Wednesday morning.

This Week in Michigan Politics, Michigan Radio's Jack Lessenberry and I talk about what Donald Trump's victory in Michigan says about our state's Republican Party, the future of John Kasich's Republican presidential campaign, and how Bernie Sanders' win was "one of the biggest upsets in state history", among other things. 


Bernie Sanders speaking in Traverse City, Michigan.
Todd Church / Flickr

Bernie Sanders pulled off an upset win over rival Hillary Clinton in Michigan's Democratic primary.

Polls going into Tuesday indicated that Clinton had a double-digit lead over Sanders -- so much for the polls.

Sanders took 49.9% of the vote. Clinton took 48.2%. 

Gov. Rick Snyder in a file photo.
Michigan Municipal League / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Governor Rick Snyder is holding firm to his vow to stay in office amid growing calls for his resignation.

Both Democratic presidential candidates called for Snyder to resign during their debate in Flint. It was the first time former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said he should step down over Flint’s water crisis.

The governor says that’s not going to happen.

“I’m not resigning, I’m going to solve this problem,” Snyder told reporters after an appearance in Detroit on Monday.

“I said I was sorry and I’m going to fix it.”

CNN

Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders didn’t agree on much during Sunday’s debate in Flint.

But both want Republican Governor Rick Snyder to resign for his administration’s handling of the Flint water crisis.

“His dereliction of duty was irresponsible. He should resign,” Sen. Sanders (D-VT) said from the stage at the Whiting auditorium.  A statement which drew applause from the partisan audience. 

A few minutes later, Hillary Clinton echoed Sanders’s call.

Bernie Sanders campaigns in Michigan

Mar 5, 2016
Bernie Sanders at a campaign stop in Traverse City, Michigan.
Sanders campaign

Bernie Sanders held a rally in Traverse City Friday.

He told a packed crowd that the decline of Detroit, and the decline of the American middle class, is partly due to international trade policies.

He says many trade policies cater to big money interests.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Stumping for votes in Michigan ahead of next week’s primary, Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton called for a “new bargain for a new economy” at a campaign stop Friday.

Speaking from a factory floor in Detroit, Clinton said that “creating good-paying jobs and raising incomes is the defining economic challenge of our time.”

Clinton outlined a vision to meet that challenge.

She said U.S. corporations should practice “economic patriotism,” and treat workers as assets, not costs.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

With the Democratic Presidential Debate taking place Sunday in Flint, Michigan, the national spotlight is once again focusing on the city’s lead-tainted drinking water.

Some people in Flint are getting tired of being in the glare of the national spotlight.

The whirl of electric clippers mixes with ESPN’s Sports Center on the TV and music from the radio as six men wait for one of two barber chairs to open up in the Consolidated Tattoo and Barbershop in downtown Flint.

Jake Neher / MPRN

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is taking aim at free trade deals like NAFTA and the recent Trans Pacific Partnership. He says they’ve cost the country millions of jobs. And he says it’s a critical difference between him and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

“Our trade policies have failed,” Sanders said at a press conference today.

Sanders is looking to shore up support among unions and blue collar workers, and says he’s not opposed to trade deals but how they’ve been negotiated by Republican and Democratic administrations. 

Sanders packs the Breslin Center at MSU

Mar 3, 2016
Ivy Herron

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was greeted by more than 10,000 supporters at Michigan State’s Breslin Center in East Lansing last night. 

  Sanders’ speech focused primarily on free college tuition, eliminating interest on student loans, and the availability of high-paying jobs. 

The second half of Sanders’ speech was geared towards criticizing his fellow presidential candidates.

people in voting booths
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There are seven primaries or caucuses between now and next Tuesday’s Michigan primary. But candidates and campaigns are already eyeing Michigan as a place to continue their roll or change their fortunes.

It is arguable that no candidate has more at stake in Michigan than Ohio Governor John Kasich. Trailing in the delegate count and yet to win a single primary or caucus, the Republican hopeful needs a win to gain credibility as the not-so-angry alternative to the Donald Trump juggernaut.

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