Brenda Lawrence

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s drinking water crisis is getting more attention from Washington.

Two senior members of Congress are due in Flint Monday.

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer and Maryland Representative Elijah Cummings are the latest members of Congress to visit Flint in recent weeks.   

They will be joined by Michigan representatives Dan Kildee, D-Flint; Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn; and Brenda Lawrence, D-Southfield.

They will meet with Flint business leaders and get a briefing from federal officials on what’s being done to address Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water.

Steve Rhodes / Creative Commons

Planned Parenthood canceled a Detroit event scheduled Monday, just days after last week's shooting massacre at Colorado clinic.

The attack in Colorado Springs left three dead and several others injured.

In our political system, sometimes the primary election is the election.

That’s the case in Metro Detroit’s 14th Congressional district, where the winner of the Democratic primary is virtually guaranteed a win November.

There are three major candidates in this year’s primary, making for a pretty competitive race in a very strange district.

A “geographical monstrosity”

I discovered something bizarre when Brenda Lawrence first ran for mayor of Southfield 13 years ago.

Back then, Southfield, a suburban business center and bedroom community just north of Detroit, had just become a majority African-American city. Lawrence was challenging a white mayor who’d been in office almost 30 years.

When I talked to some of the 70,000 residents, I found white voters who were excited about her candidacy and who wanted to get rid of the longtime incumbent. But I talked to upwardly mobile black voters who emphatically did not want a black mayor.

They told me that every community that elects a black mayor soon became an impoverished ghetto. Lawrence vowed that wouldn’t happen. She won, and it hasn’t. She has been in office ever since.