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busing

school bus
Shinichi Sugiyama / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

One of the key proposals in Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan’s State of the City address last month was a new busing system that would serve both district and charter schools. 

The announcement brought to mind Detroit's fraught history with school busing. The city's schools –  along with nearly every urban school system in the country – are still living with the legacy of the 1974 Supreme Court decision on busing in the case of Milliken v. Bradley.

A Rapid bus in Grand Rapids.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Grand Rapids can go forward with a $70 million transit project -- now that federal funding for it has been approved.

The city can begin work on a new, rapid bus line connecting Grand Valley State University's Allendale campus to downtown.

The Federal Transit Administration just approved a $57 million grant to help fund the so-called Laker Line. The Michigan Department of Transportation pledged $14 million.

Construction is scheduled start this spring. It should be finished by spring of 2020. 

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan riveted his town for nearly an hour last night with a state of the city address glowing with infectious, can-do optimism. 

Things are getting better, he insisted, facts and figures rolling off his tongue. The city is selling vacant properties no one thought possible to sell. Police response times are much better. Detroit has twice as many ambulances as it did.

3 things to know about the history of Detroit busing

Nov 12, 2013
A newspaper clipping of Detroit's busing era.
clipping courtesy of Ray Litt / via Detroit Free Press

For State of Opportunity,  I've been wading through hours of audio and stacks of research for months about Detroit's mid-1970's busing controversy.

 More specifically, the educational fall-out from the Milliken v. Bradley case.  Here's what happened.

1. Busing was used as a last resort to fix segregated schools.