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clean power plan

Michigan Radio

DTE Energy will close its last coal-burning plant by 2040, and reduce its carbon emissions by 80% by 2050, compared to 2005 levels.

The decision comes in spite of the Trump administration's decision to slam the brakes on the Clean Power Plan, which would have allowed the U.S. EPA to regulate carbon emissions for the first time.

While the president and top administration officials continue denying the causal connection between carbon emissions from human activity and climate change, many corporations, including utilities like DTE, have accepted it as fact.

Average surface temperatures for 2015. NOAA
NOAA

Michigan could benefit from cleaner energy. That was the message of a report released Monday on model scenarios about Michigan’s energy future.

The Michigan Agency for Energy’s report details what could happen in Michigan under the Clean Power Plan – and without it.

DTE Energy

Michigan will halt efforts to meet new power plant emissions standards while they’re battled over in court.

Michigan is one of 29 states suing the federal government over the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan.

The U.S. Supreme Court preemptively put a hold on that plan last week before even hearing arguments.

State officials say it now makes sense for Michigan to follow that lead, and stop moving forward until the courts offer some “clarity.”

Staples

Big businesses often oppose increased regulations. But not always: take the Clean Power Plan. The Environmental Protection Agency’s new rule requires states to reduce carbon emissions from power plants.

The coal industry and some states, including Michigan (Attorney General Bill Schuette joined the lawsuit), are fighting the rule. But, hundreds of businesses have stepped forward to support it.

Cobb power plant in Muskegon, which shut down in April 2016
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Officials with the Michigan Agency for Energy and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will announce results of the state's initial review of the federal Clean Power Plan on Tuesday.

The plan aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by roughly 30% by the year 2030.

Flickr user Ken / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state of Michigan has joined with 14 other states in launching a legal challenge to the EPA's Clean Power Plan. That's President Barack Obama's plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 30% by the year 2030.

Attorney Roger Kershner with the Howard and Howard law firm says opponents of the plan seem to be looking to delay the implementation of the rules until they can be reviewed on their merits.

The plan calls for states to implement their own system to meet the requirements, but Kershner says, "We don't know exactly what the rules are yet," only the ultimate goal.

A coal-fired power plant
Holland BPW

President Obama’s plan to reduce carbon emissions will have a profound effect on Michigan’s energy policy overhaul, but no one agrees yet on how.

Governor Rick Snyder’s administration says it’s withholding judgment. Valerie Brader is the director of the Michigan Agency for Energy and the governor’s top advisor on energy policy.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Researchers say there would be beneficial side effects from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan. 

The plan is intended to lower carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30% by the year 2030.  CO2 is a large factor in climate change.

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Michigan is saying goodbye to nine of its smaller and older coal-burning power plants.

DTE Energy is closing two facilities. Consumers Energy will shutter seven more, which are nicknamed the "Classic Seven." I recently toured one of these aging workhorses of electricity, B.C. Cobb in Muskegon.

Photo by d.boyd, Flickr

There's plenty of discussion about climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, but are we ready to actually do something substantive about reducing those emissions?

Based on a national public opinion survey by CLOSUP, the Center for Local, State and Urban Policy at the University of Michigan’s Ford School of Public Policy, the answer appears to be, "yes."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Environmentalists and others are trying to rally support in Michigan for proposed rules to force utilities to make power plants cleaner.

The Environmental Protection Agency wants tougher emission standards for the nation’s power plants.

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan aims to reduce carbon emissions from power plants by 30%  from 2005 levels by 2030.