common core

State lawmakers have formed a special bipartisan subcommittee to debate the merits of the Common Core Standards Initiative.  

Last month, the State Legislature blocked the state from implementing the school standards. Lawmakers said they needed more time to review Common Core before letting it take full effect in Michigan. The subcommittee met for the first time today in Lansing. 

Republican State Rep. Amanda Price from Park Township is the vice-chair of the subcommittee and she spoke with All Things Considered Host, Jennifer White. 

I have nothing against the Theater of the Absurd. I was taught French years ago by an odd method based on the comedies of Eugene Ionesco, the master of irrational dialogue. But absurdity doesn’t work very well as a guide to life, unless, say, you are an infant, or have only months to live.

Two plus two is, after all four. If you want your children to be successful in life, they generally need to know reading, writing and arithmetic. However, we seem to have a set of leaders, both left and right, who have made careers out of denying reality.

Let’s take education, first of all. The non-partisan, respected Education Trust, Midwest released a report yesterday showing that Michigan students are performing below the national average in every category. That’s worse than thirty-five other states.

User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

Common Core debate continues in committee

State lawmakers have formed a special committee to debate the merits of the Common Core Standards Initiative. The state Legislature blocked the state from implementing the school standards last month. Lawmakers said they needed more time to review Common Core before letting it take full effect in Michigan.

Detroit's new police chief begins first day on the job

Detroit’s new police chief, James Craig, will report to work for the first time today. Craig, a native Detroiter, returns to the city from Cincinnati where he was named police chief in 2011. Craig said some of his top goals include raising department morale and putting more civilians in positions that had been held by officers.

Teen unemployment rate more than double the state’s overall rate

State labor officials say a quarter of Michigan teens who want a job can’t find one this summer. State and local officials say limits on federal grants intended to promote youth employment are partly to blame. 

“Michael Finney, president of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, says he would like to do more to improve the teen job picture in cities like Detroit, Flint, Pontiac, and Saginaw as a way to reduce crime,” Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody reports.

There were, in a way, two conferences taking place among the state’s business and political elite on Mackinac Island last week. One was a celebration of Michigan’s comeback from the darkest days of the great recession, and of the new business-friendly climate flourishing under Governor Rick Snyder.

Make no mistake about it: Richard Dale Snyder is the most business-oriented governor this state has had since World War II. That’s in large part because he is a businessman.

He speaks their language. During his closing remarks, the governor sounded like a motivational speaker sent out to fire up a sluggish sales force.  “What’s the role of government?” he asked, answering, “Government exists to give you great customer service!”

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