common core

Politics & Government
9:02 am
Wed August 14, 2013

This week in Michigan politics: Common Core hearings, suburbs weigh in on DIA, Flint's master plan

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo Flickr

This week in Michigan politics, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss the upcoming hearings on Common Core, the suburban reaction to the possible sale of DIA art, and Flint's new Master Plan.

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Politics & Government
5:21 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

State lawmakers look to get Common Core discussions back on track

Opponents of the Common Core State Standards say that the regulations could take away local control.
user frank juarez Flickr

National education activist Diane Ravitch is expected tomorrow to urge state lawmakers not to adopt a set of nation-wide school standards. A state House panel is holding several hearings over the summer on the Common Core State Standards.

The committee will also hear testimony from supporters, including business leaders and state education officials.

Democratic state Representative Adam Zemke sits on the panel.

“If you look at the list of presenters that we have coming to talk, it’s really a wide range of positions on the Common Core. And they all have significant credibility to their standing.”

Ravitch and other opponents say the Common Core standards take away local control and are not proven to improve student performance.

Supporters say the standards are necessary to make sure Michigan students are ready for college and careers.

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Politics & Culture
5:06 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

A state House panel in Lansing has kicked off a series of hearings on Common Core. You may have been hearing about the Common Core lately. They're a set of nationwide school standards put together by the National Governors' Association and they're being debated around the nation. We spoke with Michigan School Board President John Austin, a supporter of Common Core, and state Representive Tom McMillin (R-Rochester Hills), an opponent of the standards.

And, Michigan is seeing a lot of growth in its craft beer industry. We took a look at what’s behind this growth and what some Michigan brewers are doing to protect our waters.

Also, photographer Susan Webb joined us today to talk about her exhibit in the Kelsey Museum of Archeology, which links 20th century Detroit to the ancient city of Petra.

First on the show, the latest word on new car sales in Europe is not anything that's bringing cheer at GM, Ford and Chrysler headquarters.

New car sales in Europe have just suffered their worst June in seventeen years, and the six-month number is the worst in 20 years.

Let's look at what's behind this protracted free fall in European car sales.

Reporter Russell Padmore from the BBC in London joined us today.

And, what do these European car sales numbers mean to folks at the Ren Cen in Detroit, Glass House in Dearborn, or the Tech Center in Auburn Hills? In other words, how are the poor sales in Europe affecting GM, Ford and Chrysler?

For that we turn to auto analyst Michele Krebs who’s with Edmunds.com.

Stateside
3:41 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

The Common Core hearings have begun, but just what are these standards?

State Representive Tom McMillin opposes the Common Core standards.
Michigan House Republicans

This week, a state House panel in Lansing kicked off a series of hearings on Common Core. You might have been hearing about the Common Core lately. It's a set of nationwide school standards put together by the National Governors Association and being debated around the nation.

State lawmakers recently passed a budget that bars the Michigan Department of Education from implementing the standards.

Supporters of the standards - including Governor Rick Snyder and State Superintendent Michael Flanagan - say Common Core is essential to making sure students in Michigan are ready for college and careers.

Opponents say the standards strip local control and were developed without transparency.

We sat down with Michigan School Board President John Austin, a supporter of Common Core, and State Representative Tom McMillin, an opponent of the standards.

But first, let's get a better understanding of just what these standards are.

Michelle Richard, Senior Consultant at Public Sector Consultants, specializing in education policy and research, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
10:45 am
Wed July 17, 2013

State lawmakers begin hearings on Common Core, anger and frustration ensues

State Superintendent Mike Flanagan.
Michigan.gov

Debate is underway in Lansing about whether to implement a set of state school standards.

A state House panel held its first meeting on Common Core State Standards Tuesday.

Republican Representative Tom McMillin (R-Rochester Hills) grilled state Department of Education officials about Common Core. He says the standards take away local control and were developed and adopted without public input.

Meanwhile, state Superintendent State Superintendent Mike Flanagan is urging lawmakers to go forward with a set of nationwide school standards. Flanagan argues that districts would have final say over standards and curriculum.

“Technically, [districts] don’t even have to follow the Common Core,” Flanagan said. “Now, I think they will. It’s a smart...well thought out set of standards.”

Gov. Rick Snyder also supports adopting the Common Core standards.

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Opinion
8:59 am
Wed July 17, 2013

The lunatic fringe opposes Common Core

America always has had strange outliers on the margins of our politics, from half-secret movements like the Know-Nothings to the left-wing crazies of the late 1960s. My eighth grade teacher referred to those on the farther shores of our politics as the “lunatic fringe.”

In more recent times, most of the nuts have been right-wing nuts. When I was young they opposed putting fluoride in the water, seeing that as a Communist plot. Indeed, they saw Communist plots everywhere. The head of the John Birch Society wrote a book claiming that President Dwight D. Eisenhower was an active agent of the Communist conspiracy. Asked about this once in Hillsdale, William F. Buckley Jr., said Eisenhower wasn’t a commie, but a golfer.

Well, classic communism is gone. Nobody talks about fluoride any more. But we still have a conspiracy-haunted fringe, and in Michigan today their latest cause is fighting what are called the Common Core Curriculum learning standards.

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Politics & Government
8:34 am
Wed July 17, 2013

This week in Michigan politics: Common Core, tuition for undocumented students, U.S. farm bill

Capitol Building, Lansing, MI
Matthileo Flickr

This week in Michigan politics, Jack Lessenberry and Emily Fox discuss the controversy over the Common Core State Standards, the University of Michigan’s vote on whether to offer in-state tuition to undocumented students, and the debate over food stamps and the U.S. farm bill.

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Politics & Government
7:45 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In this morning's news: Common Core hearings, limits on public employee benefits, the Heritage Tower

Morning News Roundup for Wednesday, July 17, 2013
User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Common Core hearings

A state House panel began a series of hearings about the Common Core State Standards yesterday. Republican Representative Tom McMillin says the standards take away local control and were developed and adopted without public input. Committee Chair Tim Kelly says the panel should make its recommendation on Common Core in September, Michigan Public Radio's Jake Neher reports.

Legislation to limit public employee benefits

There’s legislation in Lansing that would allow local ballot drives to cap public employee benefits. Leon Drolet, head of the Michigan Taxpayers Alliance, says the ballot campaigns would act as a safeguard against cozy relationships between public employee unions and local elected officials who bargain with them. Unions say the bill is not necessary because local officials are already accountable to voters, Michigan Public Radio's Rick Pluta reports.

Reviving Battle Creek's Heritage Tower

Battle Creek city commissioners voted last night to create a special tax district in hopes of reviving an iconic downtown building. The Heritage Tower is an 82-year-old art deco building and the upper floors of the former bank building have been condemned. Ken Tsuchiyama, Battle Creek’s city manager, fears the building may have to be demolished unless the new owner can revitalize it.

Newsmaker Interview
5:28 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Common Core standards up for debate

State Rep. Amanda Price (R) Park Township

State lawmakers have formed a special bipartisan subcommittee to debate the merits of the Common Core Standards Initiative.  

Last month, the State Legislature blocked the state from implementing the school standards. Lawmakers said they needed more time to review Common Core before letting it take full effect in Michigan. The subcommittee met for the first time today in Lansing. 

Republican State Rep. Amanda Price from Park Township is the vice-chair of the subcommittee and she spoke with All Things Considered Host, Jennifer White. 

Opinion
8:50 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Two plus two isn't five

I have nothing against the Theater of the Absurd. I was taught French years ago by an odd method based on the comedies of Eugene Ionesco, the master of irrational dialogue. But absurdity doesn’t work very well as a guide to life, unless, say, you are an infant, or have only months to live.

Two plus two is, after all four. If you want your children to be successful in life, they generally need to know reading, writing and arithmetic. However, we seem to have a set of leaders, both left and right, who have made careers out of denying reality.

Let’s take education, first of all. The non-partisan, respected Education Trust, Midwest released a report yesterday showing that Michigan students are performing below the national average in every category. That’s worse than thirty-five other states.

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Politics & Government
7:21 am
Mon July 1, 2013

In this morning's news: Common Core debate, Detroit's new police chief, teen unemployment rate

Morning News Roundup for Monday, July 1, 2013
User: Brother O'Mara flickr

Common Core debate continues in committee

State lawmakers have formed a special committee to debate the merits of the Common Core Standards Initiative. The state Legislature blocked the state from implementing the school standards last month. Lawmakers said they needed more time to review Common Core before letting it take full effect in Michigan.

Detroit's new police chief begins first day on the job

Detroit’s new police chief, James Craig, will report to work for the first time today. Craig, a native Detroiter, returns to the city from Cincinnati where he was named police chief in 2011. Craig said some of his top goals include raising department morale and putting more civilians in positions that had been held by officers.

Teen unemployment rate more than double the state’s overall rate

State labor officials say a quarter of Michigan teens who want a job can’t find one this summer. State and local officials say limits on federal grants intended to promote youth employment are partly to blame. 

“Michael Finney, president of the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, says he would like to do more to improve the teen job picture in cities like Detroit, Flint, Pontiac, and Saginaw as a way to reduce crime,” Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody reports.

Politics & Government
9:47 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Commentary: Struggle for a Party’s Soul

There were, in a way, two conferences taking place among the state’s business and political elite on Mackinac Island last week. One was a celebration of Michigan’s comeback from the darkest days of the great recession, and of the new business-friendly climate flourishing under Governor Rick Snyder.

Make no mistake about it: Richard Dale Snyder is the most business-oriented governor this state has had since World War II. That’s in large part because he is a businessman.

He speaks their language. During his closing remarks, the governor sounded like a motivational speaker sent out to fire up a sluggish sales force.  “What’s the role of government?” he asked, answering, “Government exists to give you great customer service!”

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