compound pharmacy

Persons with Fungal Infections Linked to Steroid Injections, by State
CDC

UPDATE: This story was updated on 12/18/14 at 9:48 am

Fourteen people face federal charges for mishandling tainted drugs that caused a nationwide meningitis outbreak.

A co-owner of the New England Compounding Center and the supervisory pharmacist face the most serious charges of causing the deaths of 64 people; 23 of those victims were from Michigan.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says his office helped in the federal investigation and he’s pleased to see it led to serious charges.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

AG calls for state regulation for compounding centers

"Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is calling for tighter regulation of Michigan’s 470 compounding pharmacies. Compounding pharmacies mix customized medicines based on doctors’ prescriptions. A compounding pharmacy based in Massachusetts was responsible for the medication that caused a nationwide meningitis outbreak a year ago," Rick Pluta reports.

Mental health courts legislation moves forward

"Legislation meant to strengthen Michigan’s mental health courts system has cleared the state House. The alternative courts allow certain offenders with severe mental health issues to avoid jail time and have charges erased from public records. That’s if they participate in treatment programs under the supervision of a judge," Jake Neher reports.

House approves raising cost to request a recount

"The Michigan House has voted to make candidates pay more to request a recount of ballots cast in an election. The legislation would increase to $25 the per-precinct deposit required to initiate a recount of votes in state or local elections. It now costs $10 per precinct," the Associated Press reports.

Attorney General's office

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette wants the state to regulate and inspect drug compounding centers like the one that produced the medication that caused a nationwide meningitis outbreak a year ago.

At least 264 people were infected by an adulterated pain medication, and 19 died. Michigan suffered more casualties from the outbreak than any other state.

prweb.com

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - New legislation is being proposed to more closely regulate 470 compounding pharmacies in Michigan after a deadly outbreak of meningitis a year ago.

The infection of 264 Michigan residents, 17 who died, is blamed on contaminated steroids produced by a company in Massachusetts. But Michigan's attorney general, a top licensing official and a state senator say oversight of Michigan pharmacies should be strengthened to prevent such a tragedy from happening again.

Centers for Disease Control

Another death has been linked to a tainted steroid injection in Michigan.

The Centers for Disease Control says five people in Michigan have now died as part of a fungal meningitis outbreak tied to the tainted injections. A sixth person from Michigan died in Indiana.

Angela Minicuci is with the Michigan Department of Community Health. She says state health officials have made contact with almost all the 1927 people who received the injections at four Michigan clinics.