concealed weapons permit

Augustas Didzgalvis / Wikimedia Commons

Michigan law requires each county to file an annual report spelling out crimes committed by concealed handgun holders.

These reports were ordered by lawmakers at the same time they were overhauling Michigan's concealed handgun law to make it easier to obtain permits.

The reports were supposed to make it easier to take away the permits of any concealed gun holder who broke the law.

However, some counties are not filing the mandated reports.

John Barnes dug into this story for MLive. He found that last year, 11 counties broke this law.

Barnes says the main reason given for not filing the reports is that the law was an "unfunded mandate."

From 2011 to 2013, there has been an estimated 50% increase in people who have concealed gun permits. One in 16 adults have the permit, but that does not meant that they are all carrying a gun.

Barnes said there is not a penalty for counties who do not comply.

“What you see are some extreme examples of people who commit heinous crimes, who continue to carry gun permits, even though they are in prison,” Barnes said.

*Listen to the full interview above. 

formatted_dad / flickr

“No guns” is a pretty simple and common policy in Michigan schools.

Students are expelled for bringing firearms.  But Michigan law is less clear on what schools can do when adults show up with a firearm.

It’s pretty unusual, but it occasionally happens.         

Now, I’m not talking about an armed aggressor, but a parent or some other adult visitor who carries a weapon – either concealed or openly.         

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Governor Rick Snyder must decide whether to approve or veto legislation that would allow concealed pistols in churches, day care centers, and public schools.

The governor said the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings will play a role in his thinking.         

The legislation would allow enhanced concealed pistol privileges for license holders who get additional training and range practice.

The governor faces growing pressure on the bills from both sides on the question of gun control.      

The governor said on Detroit Public Television the Connecticut school killings are on his mind as he ponders his decision.

“It does impact—you can’t have it not impact you and my thoughts and prayers go with everyone in Connecticut. I know that we all share that view,” Snyder said.

But the governor said he has not made up his mind yet. His administration was officially neutral on the gun bills when they were voted on by the Legislature.

He will have 14 days to decide once the bills are formally presented to him.

user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

The school shooting in Connecticut has prompted calls for Governor Rick Snyder to veto legislation that would allow concealed guns in public schools, churches, and day care centers.

Those are currently “no-carry” zones.

The legislation would limit the right only to people with concealed pistol licenses and extended training.

Jessica Tramontana is with the group Progress Michigan. She said those controls are not enough.

“Even if people have to go through additional hoops to verify that they know how to use this gun and supposedly do it safely, I don’t think how any child or any person could be better served by a gun in a school,” Tramontana said.

Michigan's chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics joined gun control advocates in urging Mr. Snyder to veto the bill. In a letter today, the group's president, Lia Gaggino, wrote:

“As physicians, adults and those responsible for the care and protection of innocent children we implore Governor Snyder to veto this dangerous, unnecessary legislation."

Gun rights advocates say concealed pistol holders can help keep the public safe by stopping violent situations before police are called to the scene. Connecticut law does not allow firearms on school property.

Governor Snyder’s administration was officially neutral on the Michigan legislation. His office will only say he’s carefully looking at the bills.

pollyalida / flickr

A bill approved by a House committee Wednesday would allow gun owners with concealed weapons to carry those weapons in schools and other formerly “gun-free” zones.

David Eggert from MLive has more:

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

This week, the Michigan Court of Appeals will hear arguments in a case over whether a library can ban weapons.

The Capital Area District Library has a very simple policy:  “All weapons are banned from Library premises by the fullest extent permitted by law”