cybercrime

Sean MacEntee / creative commons

Federal law enforcement agencies are warning online shoppers to be on the lookout for potential scams this “Cyber Monday” and beyond.

The Monday after Thanksgiving has become the busiest online shopping day of the year for American consumers.

And the FBI says it’s noticed a significant uptick in fraud schemes that start then, and last through the holiday season.

Have you ever watched a movie where a snarky young computer hacker wreaks havoc with civic infrastructure, and wondered if it could happen in real life?

Well, a team of researchers researchers from the University of Michigan had that same question. So they looked into a scenario like this one, featured in the remake of The Italian Job:

"Was that really possible?” said Branden Ghena, who was on the research team. “Could you actually change the light colors? Is that a thing that can really happen, or are these systems as secure as we hoped they were?"

Turns out, the answer is yes – it really can happen.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It may soon be a misdemeanor in Michigan to post “revenge porn” on the Internet.

A half-dozen states already have laws on the books to punish people who post nude or sexually explicit photos to the Web without the person’s consent.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Improving cyber security across Michigan is the goal of a new training center that opened today in Battle Creek.

The Michigan Cyber Range will mainly train National Guardsmen to identify cyberattacks.

But it will also provide training for civilians.

Joe Adams is the director of the Michigan Cyber Range. He says the training will help military and civilian IT professionals prepare for the growing threat from other countries and cyber criminals.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Cybercrime is the topic of a conference at Michigan State University today.

By one estimate, cybercrime costs the U.S. economy about $100 billion a year in money lost and money spent on beefing up online security.

Tom Holt is the organizer of the MSU cybercrime conference. He says one particular challenge for law enforcement and technicians alike is catching cybercriminals who are becoming more elusive.