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DACA

John Auchter / Michigan Radio

The cartoon wasn't necessarily meant as an indictment of Michigan (although our embarrassing weaknesses in education and public transportation will likely prevent us from winning the Amazon HQ2 sweepstakes). It was meant as an indictment of the United States as a whole.

Now, before I end up in a stump speech for some publicity-grubbing pop star running (or not running) for Senate, let me say some nice things about America. America is great. America has vast resources. America is very wealthy. America has lots of talent.

Protesters in Detroit supporting DACA recipients.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Some immigration attorneys are going to be working long hours to help people in a soon-to-expire program that defers deportation for immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

That's after President Trump announced this week he's ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — program.

Those attorneys are especially eager to counsel people eligible to renew their protection, so they don't miss the deadline to do so.  

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

Religion and politics are always a combustible mix.

During the long debate over gay marriage, many people of faith and their leaders argued that it violated their deeply held religious beliefs.

Now, more are speaking out against our nation's immigration laws and their enforcement by the Trump administration. And they're using religious convictions as the reason why. 

Today, some faith leaders gathered in Washtenaw County to make a passionate declaration of support for protecting immigrants from deportation.

nancybechtol / Morguefile

Police in southwestern Michigan arrested people who blocked traffic to protest the Trump administration's announcement that it would dismantle a program that protected hundreds of thousands of young people from deportation.

As you almost certainly know, President Donald Trump said yesterday that his administration would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA.

Currently, the DACA program is allowing something like 800,000 young, undocumented Americans, people brought to this country as children, to stay here without fear of deportation.

Trump gave Congress six months to “fix” the program, but it isn’t clear what he will do if they don’t. Campaigning for the midterm elections will be underway six months from now, and there are certain to be some embattled GOP incumbents who don’t want the president to do anything that might further jeopardize them.

sign that says "DEFEND DACA"
Flickr user Harrie van Veen https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

President Donald Trump announced yesterday that he'll end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program in six months. Gov. Rick Snyder issued a statement opposing the move and urged Congress to act quickly to clarify the status of so-called "DREAMers."

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how pressure from Snyder and other governors could affect decisions made by Congress. 

Protesters in Detroit supporting DACA recipients.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

People across the country and across Michigan protested President Trump’s plan to repeal the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

That’s President Obama’s program that offers protections to some undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.

People protested and marched in several Michigan communities, including Detroit.

Juan Gonzalez is 24-year-old DACA recipient. He came to the U.S. as a toddler, and grew up in Detroit.

Grand Rapids Public Schools Superintendent Teresa Weatherall Neal speaking at the podium
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

The Grand Rapids School Board voted today to take a formal stand against President Trump's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – or DACA.

DACA protects many young undocumented immigrants from deportation.

JVALASIMAGES / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

Last Friday, President Trump was asked about the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA). It’s the program that allows undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children to remain in the country. They're widely known as "DREAMers."

"We love the DREAMers," President Trump said. "We love everybody."

Sasha Kimel / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

President Donald Trump is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and unless Congress passes legislation before March 2018, nearly 800,000 undocumented young people could be at risk of deportation.

The administration’s announcement Tuesday does not come as a shock. Trump often bashed the program throughout his campaign, although he seemed to soften that stance slightly once in office.

Tomas Castelazo / Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons

 

President Donald Trump has signed executive orders that change the deportation priorities for people who are in the U.S. illegally. Some are worried that recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) could be caught up in the wave of increased enforcement.

Wikimedia Commons

Young immigrants were filled with joy and hope when President Obama signed the executive order called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) almost five years ago.

But today, those feelings of excitement have changed to ones of fear and apprehension.