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Dearborn police

A 2015 survey found that many police agencies devote significantly more time to firearms training than de-escalation techniques.
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When police officers are faced with potentially dangerous situations, the initial reaction is often to draw their weapon. 

That, after all, is what their training suggests they do: A 2015 survey of training curriculum at more than 280 police agencies found that the typical agency devoted 58 hours to firearms training and 49 hours to defensive tactics, compared with 10 to communication and just eight to de-escalation.

This type of training, and the warrior mentality it creates, has been at the root of deadly confrontations between police and the people they're arresting in recent years.

James Craig Baker (r), a 24 yr. old Leonard resident. And Brandon Vreeland (l), a 40 yr. old Jackson resident are facing felony charges, including carrying a concealed weapon, resisting arrest, and disturbing the peace.
Dearborn Police Department

Two men who walked into a Michigan police station carrying guns and wearing body armor are facing felony charges.

James Baker and Brandon Vreeland wanted to make a point about their right to openly carry firearms when they walked into the Dearborn Police Department earlier this month.

They are now facing felony charges, including carrying a concealed weapon, resisting arrest, and disturbing the peace. They were arraigned today. 

Kevin Matthews
Family photo

Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy announced Wednesday she will not charge two Dearborn police officers with crimes.

The officers were involved in separate shooting incidents that happened about a year ago.

Kevin Matthews was shot dead by a Dearborn police officer in Detroit, after a brief foot chase just after Christmas last year.

About a month later, another Dearborn officer shot and killed Janet Wilson in her car outside Fairlane Mall. Both were unarmed.

Dearborn Police Chief Ronald Haddad, left, with Noble Wray, head of the Policing Practices and Accountability Initiative.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

In the wake of two police shooting deaths, Dearborn Police will be getting some help from the U.S. justice department.

Dearborn Police Chief Ronald Haddad reached out to the DOJ’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) earlier this year.

Haddad says he did that after two high-profile police shootings in December and January, when Dearborn officers shot and killed two unarmed African Americans in separate incidents.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A federal religious freedom lawsuit filed against the Dearborn Police Department has been resolved.

But the two sides give different versions of how and why the case was settled.

Maha Aldhalimi  sued the city of Dearborn and its police department last year. She claimed that after police arrested her for unpaid parking tickets in 2014, officers forced her to remove her headscarf, known as hijab, for a booking photo.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Protesters shut down a busy stretch of Michigan Avenue in front of Dearborn Police headquarters Monday night.

They want more answers about the police shooting death of Kevin Matthews.

A Dearborn officer shot and killed Matthews, who was unarmed, after a car and foot chase that ended in Detroit last month. Matthews was reportedly wanted on a larceny charge.

The still-unidentified Dearborn officer says the two scuffled before the shooting.

But Matthews’ family says that’s only one side of the story. They maintain Matthews was mentally ill, but harmless.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A Detroit woman has reached a settlement with the city of Dearborn, after her HIV-positive status became an issue during a traffic stop.

Shalandra Jones told Dearborn police officer David Lacey she had HIV after he found her medication during a vehicle search in 2012.

Lacey chastised her for not revealing that immediately.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A Muslim woman says the Dearborn Police Department violated her constitutional rights when officers forced her to remove her headscarf.

Maha Aldhalimi is suing the city of Dearborn, the police department, police chief Ronald Haddad, and the officers who arrested her last September.

A mentally handicapped Dearborn man plans to sue the city for alleged police brutality.

28-year-old Ali Beydoun was stopped by police while riding his bike home from his job as a dishwasher in December.

A dashcam video shows that an officer approaches him, and asks a few questions.

But when the officer tries to pat him down for weapons, Beydoun resists. He’s then wrestled to the ground and kicked by officers.

Beydoun’s lawyers say that same video shows officers used excessive force.

Attorney Amir Makled says it also should have been obvious to officers that his client is mentally disabled.

Makled says the situation was complicated by the fact that Beydoun only speaks limited English. His family emigrated to the U.S. from Lebanon six years ago.