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Debbie Dingell

Debbie Dingell is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Michigan's 12th District as the Democratic candidate.

(Scroll below to see all the Michigan Radio stories she's been mentioned in.)

As part of our election coverage, we asked all the major-party candidates running for Congress the same questions.

4 Questions for Debbie Dingell:

1) What is the most important issue facing your district?

Creating good-paying jobs and supporting manufacturing are among the top priorities facing our district, state and nation. We need to ensure U.S. companies and workers can compete on a level playing field by opposing unfair trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). We also need to improve long-term care and work toward affordable, quality health care including mental health care for all Americans. And we need to work in a bipartisan way to fix what doesn’t work in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – repealing the ACA would be harmful, irresponsible and explode the deficit. With too many students saddled with massive student debt obligations, we need to extend low-interest student loans to borrowers and continue fighting for affordable early childhood education. Finally, protecting the Great Lakes and supporting conservation of our natural resources is a moral responsibility we have to the people we represent.

2) How do you plan to address it?

Two years ago, I first ran for Congress because I believe in getting things done. While I know one person can’t do everything, it is my belief that one person can make a difference. And if you don’t care who gets credit, you can get a lot more done. That’s the approach I’ve taken in Washington – whether it was fighting unfair trade deals so American workers can compete on a level playing field, protecting our state’s natural resources by helping to shut down the St. Clair pipeline, advocating for permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund or finding ways to make health care more affordable and accessible by partnering to fight cancer and improve our mental health system.

But there’s more to do, and it’s important that we have people in Washington who aren’t afraid to build coalitions to get things done. The American people are tired of partisan bickering and want us to work together to find solutions.

3) What book or movie have you seen/read recently that you would recommend

The only movie I have seen recently is “A Few Good Men”, which was often recommended to me when I spoke of a constituent who died in the Marines. I knew something was wrong, and the movie contains troubling parallels to what he experienced. Books are my therapy. I read one every day or two. I love fiction and history, and if you read diverse authors you can learn much. Some recent favorites: “Home” by Harlan Coben, “The One Man” by Andrew Gross, “Woman of God” by James Patterson, and “The Crossing” by Michael Connelly

4) If you don't win the election, what will you do?

I’ve helped build coalitions all my life around issues that matter. That’s something I learned the importance of in high school when I helped organize the movement that gave 18-year-olds the right to vote in Michigan or when upon learning that women weren’t included in studies funded by the federal government, I founded the Women’s Health Resource Center. That’s what I’ve worked hard to do in Congress – bring people of diverse backgrounds together to address important issues, from jobs to health to trade – because that’s how you get results and find solutions.

I’m going to work hard for every vote this election. But whether I’m in the Congress or in Michigan, I will never stop working to bring people together to solve problems. That’s one of the reasons I’m running for office; I believe we need people in Washington who are committed to working together to get things done and make a positive difference in people’s lives. 

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Courtesy https://debbiedingell.house.gov/about/full-bio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell is speaking out about the allegations of sexual harassment against fellow Democratic Rep. John Conyers.

Conyers denies claims of inappropriate behavior, but has acknowledged he settled a sexual harassment complaint using his House office fund in 2015.

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, joined local officials today in Ypsilanti to talk about President Trump's suggested cuts to Medicaid. Trump's proposed budget would eliminate nearly $700 billion from the federal program. Dingell spoke in front of community members and constituents at Community Alliance, an organization that serves developmentally disabled adults in Ypsilanti.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Access to health care for hundreds of thousands of Michiganders may be at risk as a federal funding deadline looms.

More than 40 community health centers provide care for 680,000 Michiganders. But federal funding for them expires this week. 

By one estimate, 100,000 Michiganders could lose their health care access almost immediately.

Donald Trump speaking at a rally in Fountain Hills, Arizona.
Gage Skidmore / wikimedia commons - CC BY-SA 3.0

The Trump administration is expected to release a NAFTA negotiation plan soon, which could have a large effect on Michigan's economy. NAFTA is opposed by many American workers, who say the plan has taken U.S. jobs to Mexico.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, says Trump's NAFTA plan should reflect the promises made during the campaign. In several states, including Michigan, Trump said he would pull the United States out of NAFTA. He has since decided to renegotiate.

David Sanchez and his son Benicio, who has Autism Spectrum Disoder.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell spoke to some Michigan parents of children with special needs today about what a future without the Affordable Care Act would be like.

More specifically, Dingell talked about the possibility of those families losing Medicaid if the Senate Republican healthcare bill is passed.

The B's / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

U.S. Representatives Debbie Dingell and John Conyers joined other members of Congress today to speak out against anti-Sharia law marches planned across the country this weekend -- including two marches in Michigan.

Empty classroom.
Kevin Wong / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Public education advocates and some Democrats are teaming up to convince President Trump to change his budget priorities.

The "Build Schools, Not Walls" campaign wants Trump to divert money and attention away from his plan to build a wall at the country's southern border and invest more in public education instead.

Raheel Siddiqui, a Pakistani-American Muslim from Taylor, was 11 days into his basic training with the United States Marine Corps on Parris Island in South Carolina when he died.
Courtesy of the Siddiqui family

“The physical evidence in this case tells the story of torture, abuse and suffering.”

That's the assertion of the lawyer representing the family of Raheel Siddiqui, a 20-year-old from Taylor who died while attending boot camp in South Carolina in March of 2016. According to the Marines, Siddiqui committed suicide by jumping 40 feet down a stairwell. 

His family is disputing those findings and now, his drill sergeant at Parris Island is facing charges.

One of the anchors used to hold Line 5 in place under the Straits of Mackinac.
Screen shot of a Ballard Marine inspection video / Enbridge Energy

Legislation has been introduced in Congress calling for a shut down of Enbridge's Line 5 if a federal study shows that it threatens the Great Lakes.

Line 5 is the controversial, 63 year-old underwater pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac.

The legislation would require the federal government to conduct a study to determine the economic and environmental risks to the Great Lakes from possible failures of Line 5, and it puts a 12 month deadline on completing the study.

Republican Dave Trott and Democrat Debbie Dingell are co-sponsors of the legislation.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Are Bernie Sanders supporters ready to back Hillary Clinton as the Democrat’s presidential nominee? The answer seems unclear, as the Democratic National Convention’s opening ceremony had mixed responses coming from the crowd on Monday.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell welcomed last night’s DNC discourse with open arms because of its unscripted nature.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz needed to resign her job. 

Revelations that the DNC under Wasserman-Schultz’ leadership tried to undermine Bernie Sanders’ campaign led to her announcement Sunday to step down.

Dingell says Wasserman-Schultz is a friend, but the Florida congresswoman had to go.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s drinking water crisis is getting more attention from Washington.

Two senior members of Congress are due in Flint Monday.

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer and Maryland Representative Elijah Cummings are the latest members of Congress to visit Flint in recent weeks.   

They will be joined by Michigan representatives Dan Kildee, D-Flint; Debbie Dingell, D-Dearborn; and Brenda Lawrence, D-Southfield.

They will meet with Flint business leaders and get a briefing from federal officials on what’s being done to address Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump isn't getting a lot of love from politicians in his own party, let alone from Democrats.

But U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, fast gaining a reputation for straight talk herself, had some rare words of praise.

As maybe the only 89-year-old who can claim to be a cult favorite on Twitter, former U.S. Rep. John Dingell has some 31,000 followers. 

But his wife, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell? Not so much.

So the two announced they'd made a politically savvy wager: If the congresswoman could get to 5,000 Twitter followers by last weekend, then Mr. Dingell would read mean tweets about himself on camera - something late-night host Jimmy Kimmel popularized on his show.

The internet complied. So, here you go:

   

 

 

Money
User: penywise / MorgueFile

U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell won't support a free-trade deal she says will harm the auto industry and Michigan's economy.

She's criticizing the Obama administration's Trans-Pacific Partnership on the basis that it doesn't address currency manipulation that keeps foreign currencies artificially low compared to the U.S. dollar. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

I sure would.

"Mean Tweets" is a popular segment on the Jimmy Kimmel late-night TV show.

Kimmel has convinced famous movie stars and even the president of the United States to read mean tweets about themselves in front of a camera.

Now, John Dingell has a bet with his wife, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, that she can't get 5,000 Twitter followers by Sunday.

But if she does, he'll read mean tweets about himself, Jimmy Kimmel-style, and post the video online.

Catherine Shaffer / Michigan Radio

A  veterans fair in Washtenaw County today offered one-stop shopping for employment, counseling, health, and other services. About 20 groups participated in the event at Scio Township Hall. Michigan U.S. Reps. Tim Walberg and Debbie Dingell hosted the event. 

Organizations on hand to offer help included the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, the VFW Department of Michigan Service Office, the Washtenaw County Department of Veterans Affairs, Buddy-to-Buddy Volunteer Veteran Program, Michigan Operation Freedom Outdoors, and many more. 

Struggling to repay student loans is something that unites many of us. Across the country, almost 40 million people are trying to repay $1.3 trillion in student loan debt.

Here in Michigan, 1.5 million people are trying to erase more than $39 billion in debt.

Earlier today, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, was on the campus of the University of Michigan, where she hosted a roundtable on college affordability.

Dingell is one of the sponsors of a bill in the House called the "Bank on Students Emergency Loan Reinforcement Act."

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Snyder is facing increasing pressure to veto legislation that would let some people who have personal protection orders against them carry a concealed weapon.

Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell has written a letter to Snyder urging him not to sign it.

Dingell joined us today from Washington D.C.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Five new members of Michigan's congressional delegation were sworn into office today: Democrats Debbie Dingell and Brenda Lawrence, and Republicans Dave Trott, Mike Bishop and John Moolenaar.

We spoke with Dingell about how she’ll differ from her husband, the longest-serving member of Congress in history, John Dingell; how Michigan will do now that giants like Dingell and Senator Carl Levin have retired; and how she wants to convince weary, skeptical voters that Michigan's five freshmen actually will be bipartisan.

Veteran Rep. John Dingell fractured hip in fall

Dec 13, 2014

WASHINGTON (AP) - Retiring Rep. John Dingell has a fractured hip and it will take time for the 88-year-old Michigan Democrat - Congress' longest serving member - to recover. 

An update was posted Saturday on Facebook by his wife, Debbie Dingell, who was elected to the seat last month.

Cathleen Carrigan / Flickr

Michigan will send the same number of Democrats and Republicans to Washington.

The state will send nine Republicans and five Democrats to the U.S. House. New Congressional faces include Republicans David Trott, Mike Bishop and John Moolenaar. And Democrats Brenda Lawrence and Debbie Dingell.

Debbie Dingell discusses her goals and expectations as a new representative in the U.S. House.

Dingell is taking over the 12th District from her husband John Dingell, who will retire at the end of this term.

If you follow politics in this state, you probably know that John Dingell has served longer in Congress than anyone in American history.

You also probably know he is retiring at the end of this term, and that his wife Debbie is the Democratic nominee to succeed him. And given the realities of politics, it is absolutely as certain as anything can be that she will win.

Mrs. Dingell – she uses Mrs., by the way – would not want me to say that. Neither would her main opponent, Terry Bowman, a blue-collar Republican auto worker.

Hillary Clinton speaks in Louisville.
User: UMWomen / Flickr

We'd like to believe that women, after all of these years, are treated equally in politics, but, as we know, that's not always the case.

A recent Detroit News column by writer Laura Berman has some examples of what she calls "a continuing snark campaign" that happens when women candidates run.

Berman’s column is titled "Candidate might dispute notion that it helps to be female." She talks about how women candidates are often subtly undermined.

Courtesy Raymond G. Mullins

A long-time Washtenaw County attorney plans to run in the Democratic primary for Michigan's 12th Congressional District seat.

Raymond G. Mullins is challenging Debbie Dingell in the race to succeed her husband, U.S. Representative John Dingell.

Mullins says his biggest concerns are fighting poverty, income inequality, and improving public education at all levels.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congressman John Dingell is undergoing a “minimally invasive procedure” today.

The 87-year-old Democrat recently developed atrial fibrillation.

A press release from Dingell’s office says the procedure will seek to find the source of the abnormal heart rhythm, and correct it.

Dingell is expected to spend the night at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

The 29-term congressman recently announced he will not seek reelection to his southern Michigan seat.

Dingell has represented Michigan in Congress since the mid-1950’s.  

The week in review

Mar 1, 2014
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

This Week in Review Rina Miller and Jack Lessenberry discuss John Dingell leaving congress and his wife being a front runner for the seat, the debate over same-sex marriage in Michigan, and a proposal to make sure Michiganders are taxes for internet sales.

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Debbie Dingell, wife of U.S. Congressman John Dingell, has made it official: She will run for her husband's 12th District seat. 

John Dingell is retiring after 58 years in Congress.

Debbie Dingell, 59, is a member of the Democratic National Committee, and is chair of the Wayne State University Board of Governors.

She also worked for General Motors for 30 years.

Dingell made three appearances Friday, including one at Downtown Home and Garden in Ann Arbor.

User: Brother O'Mara / flickr

Governor announces plan to help foster care system

"Gov. Rick Snyder says the state could do a better job protecting foster children if it changed the way it paid for the service. The governor unveiled a report yesterday that says the state should pay foster care agencies based on their performance," Jake Neher reports.

Schools in better financial shape

"There are fewer school districts in Michigan that have budget deficits than there were at the end of 2013, and more districts are pulling themselves out of debt. That’s according to the state Department of Education," Rick Pluta reports.

Debbie Dingell to officially run for U.S. House

"Debbie Dingell is officially launching her campaign today for the U.S. House seat held by her husband," the Associated Press reports.

The Michigan state capitol building
Thetoad / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Christina Shockley talk about the same-sex marriage trial in Michigan, the new Dingell race for Congress and President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing hub in metro Detroit.

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