deer

Business
3:49 pm
Sun October 12, 2014

Michigan widens northern farmers' deer hunt rights

Credit Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

  TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) - Farmers in five northern Lower Peninsula counties are getting a dispensation from Michigan to shoot deer as a way to reduce damage to their fruit trees and other crops.

  The Michigan Natural Resources Commission has approved the hunts in Antrim, Benzie, Charlevoix, Grand Traverse and Leelanau counties.

  Farmers have received special allowance for years under the Deer Management Assistance Permit, but only during normal hunting seasons.

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Weather
6:12 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Harsh winter taking a toll on Michigan wildlife

A DNR official says the next few weeks may be especially critical to Michigan’s songbirds, pheasants, and turkeys.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Michigan wildlife is struggling this winter, just like the state’s human population.

State wildlife officials say the next few weeks will be critical for Michigan deer, pheasants, and other animals.

As the days grow longer, animals become more active. Their metabolisms pick up and they need to forage for more food.

But when the snow is several feet deep, and a layer of ice coats normal food sources, finding enough food can be a problem.

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Environment & Science
9:06 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Beginning today, Michigan bow hunters will see how deer population has recovered from 2012 outbreak

Hunter poses with kill
mikehanback.com

This is a big day for thousands of Michigan deer hunters. It’s the beginning of bow season.

Hunters should expect to see more deer in southern Michigan this fall.

Last year, nearly 15 thousand deer died of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease or EHD.

The disease is spread to deer by small insects. It was the largest EHD outbreak in Michigan history.

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Environment & Science
4:44 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Insect-spread deer disease found in Muskegon Co.

Deer
Noel Zia Lee/Flickr

MUSKEGON, Mich. (AP) — The state says it has confirmed an outbreak of an insect-spread disease among white-tail deer in Muskegon County.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Michigan State University announced Monday that a deer has been found with epizootic hemorrhagic disease, known as EHD.

The DNR says it's the first confirmed outbreak this fall.

The department says a type of midge spreads the virus that causes EHD. It says the disease doesn't affect humans and venison from infected deer is safe to eat.

The DNR says infected deer can suffer extensive internal bleeding, lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow weaker, salivate excessively and lose consciousness. It says sick or dying deer often are found along or in bodies of water.

Environment & Science
4:13 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

Lilly the deer can stay in her Genesee County home

Lilly the deer at home.
Lilly the deer's Facebook page

State wildlife officials have agreed to let a Genesee County family keep its pet deer.

Lilly the deer was born shortly after her mother was struck and killed in an auto accident.   

A family took the animal in and for the past five years has raised it as a pet.  Lilly has the run of the house and the fenced-in yard.

But it’s against the law in Michigan to keep a deer as a pet. After receiving a complaint, the Department of Natural Resources tried to remove Lilly from the home.

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Health
8:46 am
Mon November 19, 2012

Michigan hunters feed the hungry

Ron Abfalter flickr

This week on Seeking Change, Christina Shockley spoke with Dean Hall. He is the president of Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger. The group donates it's game venison to soup kitchens and food pantries across the state. He says, "We can use the benefit of deer management to people that need the help sorely."

Environment & Science
1:46 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

DNR restricts numbers of antlerless deer hunters in southern Michigan can take

Hunters will only be able to get a certain number of anterless deer tags this season.
mwanner_wc creative commons

Hunters in much of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula will have a cap on the number of deer they can take home this season. A disease that’s killing thousands of deer has prompted the state to enforce new hunting restrictions.

Last winter was unusually warm and that’s helped create fertile breeding ground for the biting fly that spreads Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease. It has infected deer in a record 30 Michigan counties; killing at least 13,000 deer this year. EHD does not affect humans.

Brent Rudolph runs the deer and elk program at the Department of Natural Resources.

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Environment & Science
2:27 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Michigan bow season springs into action today

Michigan's archery season began this morning.
Charles Dawley flickr

Michigan’s deer season has officially begun.

Thousands of archers took to the woods this morning to mark the start of bow season, which runs through November 14, then resumes from December 1 – January 1.

According to a state report, over 300,000 archers participated during last year’s ten week season.

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Environment & Science
2:01 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

Michigan wildlife officials hope to hear from hunters about the spread of a deadly deer virus

A white tail deer showing symptoms of Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD)
mwanner_wc creative commons

Thousands of deer have died in Michigan due to a virus in the last few months.

State wildlife officials hope to hear from deer hunters this week as they try to track the disease.

This past weekend, thousands of Michigan deer hunters took to the woods.  A few were legally allowed to hunt deer, but most of them just to track deer they will try to bag when bow season starts next month.

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Environment & Science
2:00 pm
Thu August 30, 2012

Hundreds of Michigan deer may be dying in disease outbreak

WordPress.com

Update 2:00 p.m. Aug. 30

State wildlife officials say more deer have died across the state, reaching almost 2,000 casualties, reports the Associated Press.

More from the AP:

More than 1,700 white-tailed deer have been killed this summer by a disease affecting several counties in the southern half of Michigan's Lower Peninsula.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources say the outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, has been worst in Ionia County, where more than 1,100 deer have died.

DNR officials say 225 deer have been killed in Branch County, followed by 153 in Clinton County and 101 in Calhoun County.

12:20 p.m. Aug. 16

The AP reports that the disease has turned up in eight Michigan counties and killed hundreds of deer.

More from the AP:

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources said Thursday that deer infected with epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, have been found in Barry, Calhoun, Cass, Clinton, Eaton and Montcalm counties. Experts previously confirmed the disease had killed deer in Ionia and Branch counties.

EHD outbreaks have happened in isolated sections of Michigan repeatedly since 2006. The number of cases is rising nationwide because of hot, dry weather.

Wildlife biologist Tom Cooley says there are reports of more than 900 dead deer across the eight counties. But he said the die-off probably will be confined to local areas and won't affect the wider deer population.

2:30 p.m. August 5, 2012

State wildlife officials are trying to get a handle on the scope of a disease outbreak that's killing deer in large numbers in southern Michigan.

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morning news roundup
6:56 am
Mon August 6, 2012

In this morning's state news headlines. . .

User: Brother O'Mara Flickr

Casino hearing

The Michigan Court of Appeals will hear arguments Monday morning on whether a proposal to allow eight new casinos should go on the November ballot. "The campaign turned in more than half a million petition signatures to get the question on the ballot. The opponents include casinos in Detroit and Indian tribes that operate casinos. They would compete with the eight new casinos. The opponents say the ballot proposal tries to do too many things – including changing state gaming laws and amending the Michigan Constitution. They say ballot questions must be simple with a single purpose. The ballot campaign says the amendment was carefully drafted by experts in the state constitution. The three-judge court of appeals panel is not likely to rule today, but it does have to act quickly if state elections officials are going to meet their deadlines to have the November ballot ready in time," Rick Pluta reports.

Flint boxer makes Olympic debut

"Flint's own Claressa Shields makes her Olympic debut Monday morning. The 17-year-old fighter is the youngest competitor in the brand-new women's boxing event. Shields faces Anna Laurell from Sweden in the middleweight quarterfinals," Sarah Hulett reports.

Disease hits deer population

"State wildlife officials say as many of 250 deer have died in the past few weeks from a seasonal disease that usually doesn’t develop until late August or September. The disease is spread by small biting flies that infect the deer. The deer often die close to or in ponds or streams which they seek out as the disease worsen The current outbreak is in Branch, Ionia and Clinton counties," Steve Carmody reports.

Sports
11:09 am
Tue November 15, 2011

Deer baiting is once again legal in Michigan's Lower Peninsula

The crackle of gunfire can be heard today across Michigan as the state’s firearm deer season opens.   

For the first time in three years, hunters in the Lower Peninsula are legally using piles of food to lure deer. Deer baiting was temporarily banned after a Kent County deer tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease in 2008. The ban was lifted earlier this year after no more deer tested positive for the disease.   

Dean Molnar is with the Department of Natural Resources law enforcement division.  He says baiting can be effective if done properly.   

“I think in some particular areas it will be beneficial for folks to be able to see deer and harvest them…especially in areas where (the deer) have minimal habitat," says Molnar.   

Something else new this year, hunters are getting younger. The state is permitting ten and eleven year olds to hunt deer, as long as they are accompanied by an adult. The previous age limit was twelve.

Environment
10:36 am
Tue September 20, 2011

2 Cass County deer diagnosed with viral disease

A DNR official says epizootic hemorrhagic disease outbreaks are happening more frequently in Michigan, possibly because the biting flies that transmit the disease are pushing further north.
Jerry Oldenettel Flickr

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan wildlife biologists say two deer in Cass County have been diagnosed with an often-fatal viral disease.

The deer tested positive for epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD.

The Department of Natural Resources said Tuesday the disease is transmitted by a biting fly. It causes extensive bleeding. Infected deer lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, develop a high fever and finally lose consciousness.

It's not believed that humans can get EHD.

DNR wildlife chief Russ Mason says there is no known way to treat or control the disease. Michigan has had several deer die-offs from EHD as far back as 1955. The latest covered six counties last year.

Mason says outbreaks are happening more frequently, possibly because climate change is driving the biting flies farther north.

Environment
4:44 pm
Fri June 10, 2011

Michigan lifts deer-baiting ban for next three years

Deer baiting is now legal in most of Michigan
schick Morgue File

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has lifted the deer-baiting ban in most of Michigan's Lower Peninsula.  The ban had been in effect since 2008 after cases of chronic wasting disease had been reported among Michigan deer.

Mary Dettloff is with the DNR. She says baiting can create problems for the health of deer herds:

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Environment
4:23 pm
Fri June 10, 2011

Ban on deer-baiting lifted in much of Michigan's lower peninsula

A buck at a salt lick.
Tee Poole Flickr

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has lifted a ban on putting bait out for deer. From October 1st through January 1st the practice will again be allowed in most counties in the lower peninsula.

Baiting will not be allowed in Alcona, Alpena, Iosco, Montmorency, Oscoda, and Presque Isle counties - the state's six county area known as the  Bovine Tuberculosis Zone.

Officials at the Michigan DNR put the baiting ban in place in 2008 after biologists found the state's first case of Chronic Wasting Disease in a deer at a private deer breeding facility in Kent County.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a fatal brain disease similar to mad cow disease, can be spread from deer to deer through saliva and blood. The disease started out west in elk and made its way into some Midwestern deer herds. Wisconsin had to cull big herds of deer to get the disease under control.

Banning a practice such as baiting, a practice that brings many deer together in one spot as they eat or lick the bait, was thought to be the best way to prevent the spread of CWD in Michigan - apparently, it worked.

From the Michigan DNR press release:

At the time, the Department followed protocol as outlined in the state's emergency response plan for CWD and immediately banned baiting and feeding of white-tailed deer in the Lower Peninsula. The NRC then passed regulations making the ban permanent, but said it would reconsider the ban in three years, giving the DNR adequate time to perform disease testing and surveillance in the state for CWD.

In the three-year period, the DNR tested thousands of white-tailed deer for CWD, but did not detect another case.

So in a 4-3 vote by the Natural Resources Commission, the three-year old ban was lifted. It will be reconsidered in 2014.

In the Grand Rapids Press, Howard Meyerson writes that hunters have been split on the issue. Around half in favor of baiting and half against it. Meyerson writes that in 2008, many hunters were glad the ban was put in place:

They said it altered deer behavior and pulled deer off their lands and onto others where people baited. That, in turn, prompted them to resort to “defensive baiting.”

On the flip side, however, others are crowing.

“The good guys won,” said Jeff DeRegnaucourt, an avid hunter from Rockford who was glad to see the ban lifted.

But the nation’s top professional wildlife biologists probably wouldn’t see it that way. Mason is one who steadfastly urged keeping the ban in place. Steve Schmitt, the DNR’s wildlife disease expert, was another.

Environment
11:45 pm
Mon April 18, 2011

Deer baiting ban to be lifted?

Baiting deer (often with corn, apples, sugar beets or carrots) has been banned for three years in the Lower Peninsula.
(Photo by Scott Bauer - USDA)

Baiting deer is the subject of lots of debate in Lansing this month. There’s a ban on feeding deer in the Lower Peninsula that could be lifted in June. The restriction was a response to the discovery of chronic wasting disease in one deer in 2008. But as Peter Payette reported for The Environment Report no more sick animals have been found and the pressure is growing to let hunters bait wild deer.

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Hunting
8:52 am
Thu April 7, 2011

Future of Michigan ban on deer baiting to be discussed

The state’s Natural Resources Commission holds a discussion today on deer baiting. The commission is set to decide in June whether to lift the baiting ban in the Lower Peninsula. Wildlife biologists say feeding deer causes them to congregate unnaturally, and that it helps spread disease.

But Don Inman – a retired conservation officer – thinks some baiting is okay. He says large feed piles are a problem, but a small amount of bait is not.  

"From my experience and all of my friends too who have hunted in this area and hunted when baiting was legal, we seldom saw more than four deer. We put out a coffee can and spread it around. "

The state banned deer baiting in the Lower Peninsula in 2008 after a deer in Kent County tested positive for chronic wasting disease.

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Outdoors
7:04 am
Mon December 6, 2010

Incoming director of the Michigan DNR wants more hunting, fishing

Rodney Stokes, incoming Director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, wants more people in hunt in Michigan
Noel Zia Lee/Flickr

Michigan's soon-to-be Director of the Department of Natural Resources, Rodney Stokes, says he wants more people to hunt and fish in the state.

Stokes was named director of the department by Governor-elect Rick Snyder earlier this month.  Snyder announced he would be dividing the Department of Natural Resources and Environment into two agencies: The Department of Natural Resources and The Department of Environmental Quality.

Stokes told The Detroit News that he wants to expand the focus of the department's recruitment efforts and that he has no plans to increase license fees.

The Associated Press reports:

Revenues from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses were $45.3 million in the most recent budget, said Sharon Schafer, the department's assistant division chief for administration and finance. That's down from 2005 when adjusted for inflation.

Hunting Season
5:54 pm
Mon November 29, 2010

Firearm deer season comes to a close Tuesday

Deer
Noel Zia Lee/Flickr

Tuesday is the final day for a Michigan fall tradition….firearm deer season.

Brent Rudolph is Deer and Elk Program leader for the Department of Natural Resources and Environment.  He says deer season got off to a slow start two weeks ago. But, he says:

We have heard talk that both that first weekend…and the long Thanksgiving weekend…having a decent number of hunters. 

Rudolph says it will be next Spring before a final estimate for the number of deer harvested during the past two weeks will be known.