WUOMFM

Democratic Party

Michigan GOP Convention
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

What do you do when the group you’ve belonged to your entire life no longer represents your values?

This has often been a problem in the melting pot that is America. Children upset parents by rejecting traditional customs, like arranged marriage.

But it is also a problem in politics.

Credit: Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Democratic Party's stinging loss in the 2016 presidential election has led to much hand-wringing and talk about coming up with a better message that resonates with voters.

Jen Eyer, senior vice president at Vanguard Public Affairs, thinks the latest Democratic messaging attempts prove the party still doesn't "get it."

For example, take the new sticker campaign recently unveiled by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the campaign arm for House Democrats. One of the slogans reads: “Democrats 2018: I Mean, Have You Seen The Other Guys?”

crowd of people
GencoSidlePhotos / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

After losing Michigan in a presidential election for the first time since 1988, the Democratic Party is signaling a renewed focus on the state.

Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez will be in Detroit and Flint this weekend on the first leg of a national “Democratic Turnaround Tour.” Other stops on the tour include New Jersey, Texas, and Virginia.

Perez told Stateside that the Democratic Party needs to make a greater effort to connect with voters.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

National Democratic Party leaders will gather in Detroit today to discuss the party’s future direction.

Party leaders are still assessing their setbacks from the 2016 election, and looking ahead to 2018 and beyond.

The forum will feature several candidates for the party’s open chairman seat. Among them is Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana

He thinks the party needs a fresh start, by focusing more attention on local and state-level politics.

Digital_Third_Eye / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Across the country, Democrats are asking how to come back from their 2016 losses. One California party leader has a proposal: move the party’s headquarters to Michigan.

Phil Angelides is a former chairman of both the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission and California's Democratic Party. In an article in Politico, he urged the party to “rebuild from the ground up.” Detroit, Angelides believes, is the best place to begin that process.

MichiganDems.com

There is no way to sugar-coat the results of the November election if you're a Democrat. It was a disaster, anyway you cut it.

How do Democrats regroup, re-calibrate and rebuild?

That's the job of the Chairman of Michigan's Democratic Party Brandon Dillon and he joined Stateside to talk about it.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Pundits and pollsters are trying to figure out how they miscalled the presidential race. So many were nearly certain Hillary Clinton would win.

In a Washington Post opinion piece Member of Congress Debbie Dingell, a Democrat, says she knew Clinton was in trouble. She said so at the time. Her fellow Democrats didn’t listen.

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

  

The Michigan State Capitol building in Lansing was built in 1879, and later restored in 1992. Now, in 2016, its caretakers say there are some real problems with the guts of the building.

"It's a stewardship issue that has to be met by the current group of lawmakers, as for any group of lawmakers," said Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants who also served as a Republican legislative leader.

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty (left) interviews Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) with Stateside Executive Producer Joe Linstroth in Ann Arbor on October 6, 2016.
Mitchell Rivard

Republicans and Democrats have made it clear that the state of Michigan is in play for the 2016 presidential election.

Another high-profile campaign visit to the state comes in the form of Vermont senator Bernie Sanders. He is making stops in four cities (Dearborn, Ann Arbor, East Lansing, Grand Rapids) stumping for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

Map of Michigan's 1st congressional district.
Map USDOI shape file by user 7partparadigm / Wikimedia Commons

Most Michigan congressional districts are drawn to favor one party over another.

Logo
flickr user DonkeyHotey / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

This election year has a lot of people scratching their heads.

Many just can’t wrap their heads around how or why two people who are not that well liked - according to the polls - are the nominees of the major parties.

And it seems that Republicans and Democrats just can’t understand why the people in the opposite party think the things they do.

There’s a new book that looks at how the parties and their supporters are different and tries to help make sense of American politics today.

The book is Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats, written by David Hopkins and Matt Grossmann.

Senator Tim Kaine is coming to the University of Michigan on Tuesday
PROjoelrivlin/flickr commons

Senator Tim Kaine is campaigning in Ann Arbor on Tuesday afternoon.

The Democrats' pick for vice president will talk about getting out the vote, especially for younger voters.

Ann Arbor is, of course, pretty liberal leaning, and Kaine will talk to a college crowd at the University of Michigan.

For most people, May is one of the best months. The flowers are blooming; it’s pretty clear that it isn’t going to snow any more, and summer is coming. But I wouldn’t be surprised if Michigan Democrats start regarding May with a shudder. For two years in a row, the party has been embarrassed in May by one of their own. Last year it was State Senator Virgil Smith Jr., one of the legislature’s dimmer bulbs.

Bernie Sanders campaigns in Michigan

Mar 5, 2016
Bernie Sanders at a campaign stop in Traverse City, Michigan.
Sanders campaign

Bernie Sanders held a rally in Traverse City Friday.

He told a packed crowd that the decline of Detroit, and the decline of the American middle class, is partly due to international trade policies.

He says many trade policies cater to big money interests.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

With the Democratic Presidential Debate taking place Sunday in Flint, Michigan, the national spotlight is once again focusing on the city’s lead-tainted drinking water.

Some people in Flint are getting tired of being in the glare of the national spotlight.

The whirl of electric clippers mixes with ESPN’s Sports Center on the TV and music from the radio as six men wait for one of two barber chairs to open up in the Consolidated Tattoo and Barbershop in downtown Flint.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s presidential primary ballot will begin to shape up this week.

Michigan’s Republican and Democratic presidential primaries are March 8. 

But who gets a spot on the ballot? Hundreds of people are running for president of the United States. Of course, you’ve heard of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. But how about John Blyth or Mike Diggs?

Michigan Democrats pick Brandon Dillon as new leader

Jul 11, 2015

PORT HURON, Mich. (AP) - The Michigan Democratic Party has elected state Rep. Brandon Dillon as its new party chairman to succeed Lon Johnson, who is resigning to run for Congress. 

The State Central Committee met Saturday in Port Huron, where delegates chose the Grand Rapids lawmaker to lead the party.

Johnson last month announced his candidacy for the 1st Congressional District that includes all of the Upper Peninsula and the northern Lower Peninsula. He was party chairman for more than two years.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Michigan Democrats are gathering to conduct party business and to re-elect their leader for another two-year term.

Lon Johnson is expected to be chosen as chairman again at the party's convention Saturday afternoon in Detroit. He took charge in 2013.

  He says the party's infrastructure has improved under his watch, but Democrats have to start winning races.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican congressional leaders and President Barack Obama are talking about trying to find common ground moving forward.

Flint Congressman Dan Kildee says Tuesday’s election results showed voters are dissatisfied with the way things have been run in Washington.

But Democrat Kildee says Republicans should be careful how they read the results.

Jake Neher / MPRN

Another Clinton was in Michigan on Wednesday urging Democrats to show up to the polls on November 4th. Last week it was former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. This time it was her husband rallying Democrats to try to get out the vote.

“We don’t win these races and we get this gridlock because too many people don’t vote at midterm,” said former President Bill Clinton in front of a crowd of hundreds of Democrats.

@billclinton

Bill Clinton will be campaigning with Democrats in Flint tomorrow.

The former president is just the latest big-name Democrat to push for votes in Michigan. First Lady Michelle Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have made campaign stops in Detroit to rally the Democratic Party base in recent weeks.

President Barack Obama is expected to visit Michigan before Election Day.

One analyst says Democrats are bringing in big names in an attempt to boost turnout in next month’s election.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

  LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Democrats who need a five-seat swing to upend Republican control of the Michigan House face a number obstacles in the November 4th election.

  They include gerrymandered districts, a financial disadvantage and historical trends favoring the GOP in a non-presidential election year.

  But Representative Brandon Dillon, who's leading House Democrats' campaign to retake power for the first time since 2010, says there are enough chances to pick up seats.

  Republicans, however, like their chances to fatten a current 59-50 edge in the House.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is lending support to GOP U.S. Senate candidate Terri Lynn Land.

Romney joined other Michigan Republicans today in Livonia. He said it’s important for Michigan voters to elect Land in November, so Republicans can regain control of the U.S. Senate. Romney says then the GOP will set the national agenda, not President Obama.

“We’ll be passing legislation that will get on his desk,” Romney told the crowd. “In Washington, (Land’s) voice will be one of those that takes us in a very different direction then the president has.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Livonia will be the center of Michigan’s political landscape on Thursday.  

Republicans and Democrats are both planning big rallies in the Detroit suburb tomorrow.

The Republicans roll into town first. Their event will be headlined by former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney.  

The event’s being called “CommMITT to the Comeback” rally. Top Republican candidates will be there, from Attorney General Bill Schuette to U.S. Senate nominee Terri Lynn Land. 

Noticeably absent is Gov. Rick Snyder.

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley
Photo courtesy of www.governorelectricksnyder.com

Republicans and Democrats in Michigan will gather this weekend at party conventions to nominate candidates for statewide offices.

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson and Attorney General Bill Schuette are expected to be nominated for second terms at the state Republican convention in Novi.      

But it looks like there will be a fight over lieutenant governor. Gov. Rick Snyder wants the convention to renominate Brian Calley. But Tea Party activist Wes Nakagiri wants to deny Snyder his choice.

State GOP chairman Bobby Schostak says Calley appears to have the edge going into Saturday’s convention.

“I think that overall Brian Calley has been working very hard across the state to get the message across that he deserves to continue to be the lieutenant governor, and it’s going to be very hard to beat him,” says Schostak.

Democrats are meeting in Lansing this weekend. Oakland County Clerk Lisa Brown is Mark Schauer’s choice for a running mate. Democrats are also expected to nominate Mark Totten for attorney general, and Godfrey Dillard for secretary of state.

The parties will also nominate candidates for the state Supreme Court and education boards. 

We know the most important job in state government is that of governor, but the next two top jobs are far more important than we tend to realize.

Michigan’s attorney general is the top lawyer for the entire state, both for state government and the interests of all the citizens.

Meanwhile, whoever is secretary of state is responsible for pretty much everything that has to do with voting and elections – not to mention driver's licenses, automobile and other registrations, and regulating notaries in the state.

We elect these officials by a statewide vote in November. They serve four-year terms, and can be re-elected only once.

But here’s the odd thing about these jobs. We the voters have the final say in November, but have virtually no say in who the major political parties choose as their candidates.

User: Andrew Ferguson / Flickr

It's a big weekend for Michigan's Democrats and Republicans: Both parties hold their state conventions – the Democrats in Lansing, the Republicans in Novi.

Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, the co-hosts of Michigan Radio’s It's Just Politics, gave us a preview of the conventions.

For this weekend, Clark says she’ll be watching for a Tea Party effort to pry Brian Calley out as lieutenant governor.

"Tea Partiers and very conservative Republicans, looking at the Snyder Administration and saying, 'you know what? You may say you're conservative, but you are not conservative enough,'" says Clark.

As for the Democratic convention, there’s not quite as much drama expected in Lansing. However, Clark notes that it’ll be interesting to look at the Democratic nominees' races for attorney general and secretary of state.

* Listen to the interview with Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta above.

* Be sure to tune in tomorrow morning at 9 when Rick Pluta will host a special call-in show with Gary Peters, Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate. 

 

Both major political parties have their state conventions this week. Republicans are meeting in Novi; Democrats in Lansing.

There’s always an element of the high school reunion about these conventions; people, including the press, look forward to them in part because they get to see old friends.

However, there are also squabbles.

Most of this year’s focus has been on the Republican gathering, where Tea Party insurgents are attempting to throw Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley off the ticket.

Democrats, however, have their own struggle behind the scenes.

In case you are new to this, these conventions actually nominate most of each party’s candidates for statewide office.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

New data show Michigan congressional candidates are digging deep into their own pockets to pay for their campaigns.

A trio of businessmen running for Republican congressional nominations have dug the deepest, according to filings with the Federal Election Commission this week.

Pages