Detroit Emergency Manager

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Detroit Mayor Bing says appeal unlikely to halt an EM

"Detroit Mayor Dave Bing says the City Council's appeal of Gov. Rick Snyder's determination that there's no plan to solve Detroit's financial emergency is unlikely to halt an emergency manager's appointment. Bing says he endorses the council's assertions that a viable restructuring plan is in place, and he released a progress report on the plan Tuesday," the Associated Press reports.

Governor Snyder signs bill to add more people to sex offender registry

"More people will be added to Michigan's public sex offender registry under a bill signed by Gov. Rick Snyder.  The bill signed Tuesday will require people convicted of a single Tier I offense for some crimes involving minors to be placed on the online registry. Offenses that qualify include possessing child pornography and surveillance of a minor," the Associated Press reports.

Bill would require welfare recipients to pass drug tests

"Michigan lawmakers are planning to consider a bill that would require welfare applicants and recipients to pass drug tests. [The] legislation being considered . . .  would establish a program of suspicion-based substance abuse screening and testing for Family Independence Program applicants and recipients who are at least 18 years old," the Associated Press reports.

In a weird twist of fate, two remarkable events in Detroit’s recent history are happening at virtually the same time.

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was convicted of multiple federal corruption charges Monday. And Governor Snyder is expected to appoint an emergency financial manager within days.

The timing is a coincidence, but there’s some connection between the two events—and a lot of symbolism.

Ifmuth / Flickr

Each week we talk Michigan politics with Susan Demas, political analyst for Michigan Information and Research Service, and Ken Sikkema, former Senate Majority Leader and Senior Policy Fellow at Public Sector Consultants. Today we talk about transportation funding. Governor Snyder has called for $1.2 billion to address roads and transportation in Michigan, but there's no agreement in the legislature about how to get the money.

Plus, people are filing taxes and starting to feel the impact of some of the changes in the Michigan tax code, which includes the reduction in the Earned Income Tax Credit. Now a coalition is calling for the EITC to be restored, and Democrats in the House and Senate agree. What's next for the EITC?

And, as the Detroit City Council plans to appeal Governor Snyder’s decision to appointment an emergency financial manager for the city they are doing so without the support of Mayor Dave Bing who says it’s a fight they can’t win. Is he right?

Some years ago, when the Green Party in Germany first had a chance to join a coalition government, there was a tremendous battle within the party between the purists and the pragmatists. The purists, who were nicknamed the “fundis,” felt that would be selling out. The practical politicians, called the “realos,” thought that by joining the government they could influence events and at least get some of their agenda enacted.

The pros and cons of a Detroit emergency manager

Mar 4, 2013

Governor Rick Snyder's declaration that he is preparing to appoint an emergency financial manager to run the city of Detroit has made headlines on a national scale.

As the stories are filed and the headlines are written, the true impact of an emergency manager in Detroit is resonating in the streets and neighborhoods of the city where people's lives will be touched deeply by this historic change in Detroit's government.

Cyndy discussed two views of this question with Tom Barrow and James Hill.

Tom Barrow is President of the group Citizens for Detroit's Future.  He has also run for Mayor of Detroit three times -against Coleman Young in 1985 and 1989, and then against Dave Bing in 2009.  His name is also coming up as a possible mayoral candidate this year.
James Hill is the Detroit Free Press politics editor.  His column in Sunday's Free Press was titled "Teamwork, with and for the people, can remake city."

In his column, he wrote:

We are not second-class citizens, even though we often get second-class services. We want the same as people in Troy, Tawas or Sebewing. It's not about race, it's about basic human needs...and common sense.

Click the audio above to hear the full interview.