Detroit music

Of the many things made in Michigan that have become part of the fabric of American culture — the auto industry, Motown — punk rock is often overlooked. In 1967, years before The Sex Pistols performed incendiary anthems, Iggy Pop and his band The Stooges created an explosive new sound in Detroit that would influence generations of musicians.

This indie-soul group is getting a lot of attention around the Michigan music scene. Their new album Tarantula Manson comes out this fall.

Listen to the full interview above to hear about Hernandez's path to becoming a singer-songwriter, band manager, and female force in the Detroit music scene.

The group performs at Saint Andrews Hall in Detroit on Friday, March 22nd. For more information visit their website. But, for now check out an acoustic performance from band members in Michigan Radio's Studio East.

Movement: Detroit Electronic Music Festival / Facebook

The second annual Orion Music + More Festival will take place on Detroit's Belle Isle on June 8 and 9.

The festival, created and headlined by the hard rock group Metallica, debuted in 2012 in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

The Festival lineup includes 30 acts on five stages, including groups like the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Bassnectar.

Gary Graff is the music writer for the Oakland Press and is a dedicated observer of the music scene in Detroit and in Michigan.

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty spoke with Graff about Orion Music + More and the Festival's influence in Southeast Michigan.

You can listen to the full Stateside interview above.

Mercedes Mejia

Fifty years ago, singer Bettye LaVette recorded her first single and Top Ten hit, “My Man- He’s a Lovin’ Man.” But the time between “Man’s” release and now has not been one of unscathed fame and stardom.

The Muskegon-born artist delves into the ups and downs of her career in her new autobiography, “A Woman like Me.”

Along with her book, LaVette recently released a new album, “Thankful ‘N Thoughtful.” She will perform material from the record at her show tonight at the Ark.

The Marvelettes have been nominated for a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Motown favorites, the Marvelettes, have been nominated for a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Starting out as a group of high school students in Inkster, the Marvelettes went on to give Motown its first number one single—the 1961 hit, “Please Mr. Postman.”

From the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame:


Many genres of music have deep roots in the city of Detroit, including punk, rock-and-roll, blues, techno and soul music. A new organization wants to help connect people and groups that have been archiving Detroit’s musical history.  

Carleton Gholz is the president and founder of the Detroit Sound Conservancy. He’s been researching a book about the rise of DJ and hip-hop culture in Detroit. During that time, he’s come across small archiving groups, music journalists, and older musicians. Now Gholz wants to unite them.

Detroit recording company preserves local sound

Jun 15, 2012
Beehive Recording Company

If you ran into Stephen Nawara nine years ago, he was probably off touring as the bassist of the Detroit-based band, Electric Six. Some of their top 10 hits include songs like “Danger High Voltage,” and most recently, “Gay Bar.” But now he volunteers 40 hours of his time outside of his day job to work on his record label, The Beehive Recording Company.