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Detroit Police

DeAngelo Lamar Davis (left) pleaded not guilty to six total murder and weapons charges. He was arraigned Friday at the 34th district court in Romulus by retired judge Vesta Svenson (right)
Tyler Scott

At his arraignment in the 34th district court in Romulus Friday, DeAngelo Lamar Davis appeared via video conference from Wayne County Jail and entered a plea of not guilty.

Davis is being charged with first degree murder and other charges for the shooting death of Wayne State University officer, 29-year old Collin Rose.

Davis is a previously convicted felon also facing several weapons charges.

Wayne State Police Chief Anthony Holt said it's not yet clear what led to Officer Rose being shot during a traffic stop in Detroit on Tuesday.

DeAngelo Lamar Davis, a 31-year-old Detroit man, allegedly shot and killed Wayne State University Police Officer Collin Rose during a traffic stop on Tuesday.

The Wayne County Prosecutors Office is charging Davis with First Degree Murder, Felony Firearm, Murder of a Police Officer, and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

Rose, age 29, was apparently trying to take Davis into custody during a traffic stop, when he called for backup. Davis, who was on a bike, allegedly shot Rose in the head and fled on foot.

cop car
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A Detroit man is facing a terrorism charge for making threats against police officers on social media.

Nehru Gowan Littleton, 40, made a series of threats against police officers on Facebook in July, according to Detroit Police. They included statements like “All lives can’t matter until Black Lives matter!!!! Kill all white cops!!!”

That amounts to a “terroristic threat” under Michigan law, according to state Attorney General Bill Schuette, who is bringing the charges.

Metro Detroit racial divide is widest over police

Sep 16, 2016
Demostrators in downtown Detroit protest police-involved shootings that have killed African-Americans.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

While black and white metro Detroiters are finding common ground on racial progress, there remains a gulf, shaped by vastly different experiences, in how the two groups view police.

And nowhere are those differences laid more bare than in the divergent views on the protest movement known as Black Lives Matter.

Roughly eight-in-10 African-American residents in metro Detroit express support for Black Lives Matter, according to to a survey on racial attitudes conducted this month for the Detroit Journalism Cooperative. BLM arose three years ago in reaction to the killing of unarmed blacks by police. Black support for the group (79% strongly or somewhat support BLM) is more than double that among white metro-Detroiters, 34%.

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch at a Detroit rally promoting police-community ties.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Department of Justice is “ready to work” with Detroit and other cities to help ease tensions between police and many communities.

That was U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s message over the past two days in Detroit.

Lynch first spoke at a rally outside a Detroit police precinct for the National Night Out Tuesday. That annual event promotes improved police-community relations.

Lynch admits the country “has had some challenging times” with that lately, as high-profile violence has “frayed trust” between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

Davontae Sanford was wrongfully convicted of four murders at age 14. He was released from prison last month after spending nearly nine years behind bars.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

The case goes back to a grisly quadruple homicide in Detroit in 2007.

Police interrogated 14-year-old Davontae Sanford, who says he was coerced into giving a false confession.

Former Detroit police commander James Tolbert was one of the cops who questioned Sanford. He testified in court that Sanford was able to draw a crime scene sketch for police of where the murders took place.

But later, Tolbert admitted to police that he actually drew most of the sketch.

Still, Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy announced late Tuesday there's insufficient evidence to charge Tolbert with perjury. Her office says even if Tolbert changed his statements about evidence, it’s really hard to actually prove perjury, because you have to prove that somebody intentionally lied under oath.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan police officers can never be criminally prosecuted for statements they are compelled to make during internal investigations — even if those statements turn out to be lies that amount to perjury or another crime.

That’s what the Michigan Supreme Court decided this week, in the case of three Detroit officers charged with obstructing justice.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Detroit police are about to start recording far more of what they do.

The Detroit City Council approved a $5.2 million contract for police body cameras and in-car video systems Tuesday.

The move has the support of Detroit Police Chief James Craig, and the city’s police unions.

Craig says the department just escaped more than a decade of federal oversight for unconstitutional policing practices. Now, the challenge is sustaining the progress it made.

Brian Widdis / Bridge

Bill McGraw reports for Bridge, a Michigan Radio partner in the Detroit Journalism Cooperative.

The Black Lives Matter movement was peaking a year ago, when protesters took to the streets of Baltimore over the death of a black man in police custody. On the same day, an angry crowd gathered on Evergreen Road on Detroit’s west side.

The situation on Evergreen quickly grew tense. An agent from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement who was on a task force with Detroit police had shot and killed a 20-­year-old black Detroiter, Terrance Kellom, a parole absconder who was wanted for armed robbery.

“Huge crowd. We were surrounded,” Assistant Chief Steven Dolunt recalled in late March. “They were calling for the chief. I called him. I said, ‘You need to get here right away. Now.’’’

The chief of police is James Craig. The crowd knew him because in nearly three years at the top of the Detroit Police Department, he has become such a familiar figure on city streets and media outlets that some people, both friends and foes, call him “Hollywood.”

Craig’s style is low­-key and controlled, more Woodward Avenue than Sunset Strip, but he doesn’t mind the nickname. He says his visibility is part of a deliberate strategy to communicate with Detroiters.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

After 13 years, the Detroit police department is now officially free of U.S. Justice Department oversight.

The department had been under two federal consent decrees since 2003.

Those decrees stemmed from a host of unconstitutional policing practices, ranging from excessive use of force, to illegally detaining witnesses.

Federal judge Avern Cohn signed off on a full return to local control this week, after an 18-month transition period.

Police Chief James Craig says 13 years of federal oversight helped create a “constitutional” police department.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Detroit Police Department plans a program that will allow the public access to department data that includes complaints against officers and police runs to problem areas.

The Detroit News reports officers' names won't be made public, but the nature of complaints by precinct will be available.

Police Chief James Craig says: "If you want to build trust, you can't act like you're hiding something."

Family photo

A watchdog group is calling for a Michigan State Police investigation into a fatal police shooting in Detroit last week.

A Dearborn police officer, whose name hasn’t been released, reportedly tried to arrest 35-year-old Kevin Matthews on Dec. 23.

Dearborn police say Matthews escaped their custody after being detained for suspected larceny earlier that day. He was also wanted on a misdemeanor warrant in a different city.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Detroit police officers should get a pay bump starting in 2016.

City officials announced Monday that officers will get  a 4% raise January 1.

It’s part of a deal that will extend the city’s three police unions’ contracts through 2020. That contract was negotiated and approved in 2014, during the city’s bankruptcy.

Police Chief James Craig says a pay boost is crucial to attracting and retaining officers, something the department is struggling with right now.

The Detroit City Council
Michigan United

The Detroit City Council voted Tuesday to restore full power to the city's board of police commissioners.

The civilian police oversight board was stripped of its power while Detroit was under emergency management in 2013.

Prior to that, the board had the final say in matters of employee discipline and played a role in shaping department policies and procedures.

Rebecca Kruth

The Detroit Police Department says it's moving forward with plans to put body cameras on all officers. All marked police vehicles will have dashboard cameras too.

Last spring, the DPD announced a 90-day pilot program to test several body cameras in the field.

Mayor Mike Duggan said the 20 officers who volunteered to be part of the program concluded "the technology works."

wikimedia commons

A Detroit police officer is accused of knowing about a conspiracy to commit murder, then lying to investigators about it.

A one-man grand jury indictment unsealed Monday lays out charges against Officer Elijah Lately.

Lately is accused of knowing about a plot to murder a witness in another criminal case.

Wikimedia Commons

A dog’s death at Detroit’s animal control shelter is sparking renewed calls to overhaul the facility.

The dog died of the highly-contagious parvovirus, after its owner and staff found it in grave condition at the shelter. Animal control officers had been holding the dog after it reportedly bit two people.

Police lights.
J J / Flickr

The Detroit Police Department says it will review its vehicular pursuit policy, following a crash earlier this week that killed two young children.

The six- and three-year-old were standing on the sidewalk in their east side neighborhood when a car fleeing police careened onto the sidewalk and struck them.

According to columnist Nancy Kaffer, there are now 500 security cameras operated by private security companies in the downtown Detroit area.
user Tom Page / flickr


As Dan Gilbert keeps buying buildings in downtown Detroit – more than 70, now – we're seeing the prospect of new businesses, new tenants, and new people downtown.

Detroit Free Press columnist Nancy Kaffer wonders what this means in terms of private security and public space.

taliesin / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Floyd Dent, the black man who was beaten and tased by white Inkster police officers, goes to court this week on a drug charge after the officer who repeatedly punched him in the head says he found cocaine in Dent's car.

Dent says the officer, William Melendez, planted the drugs on him.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan riveted his town for nearly an hour last night with a state of the city address glowing with infectious, can-do optimism. 

Things are getting better, he insisted, facts and figures rolling off his tongue. The city is selling vacant properties no one thought possible to sell. Police response times are much better. Detroit has twice as many ambulances as it did.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Detroit may have wrapped up 2014 with the fewest number of homicides in decades.

The end-of-year crime data is still preliminary.

But Detroit police officials say the official homicide tally for 2014 stands at 300 right now—though several more people were killed in the final week of the year.

Some graffiti found on a Midtown Detroit youth center this week evokes recent incidents of violence and tension between police and civilians--and it's being condemned as inflammatory by both police and community groups.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A new umbrella group says Michigan’s leaders need to hear their concerns about fairness in law enforcement.

The Coalition for Justice and Fairness to Reform Law Enforcement has come up with a list of priorities it wants state and local officials to address, members announced in Detroit Tuesday.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Detroit's police chief says his department needs stun guns, especially after an officer was attacked with a razor blade.

  Chief James Craig tells The Detroit News that he's talked to the mayor about purchasing Tasers. He acknowledges they're controversial and is open to a public discussion about their use.

Handcuffs
User the commedian / Flickr

In yesterday's Detroit Free Press, Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor, wrote:

"We need to concentrate on reinstalling basic covenants that value life over property or attitude or even respect. And we need to remind ourselves that when police decide that their job is to compel submission rather than enforce the law, the slide to the role of executioner has too few speed bumps."

Stephen joined me to talk about his column and what recent national events mean for Detroit.

Here's our conversation:

A jury is deciding whether a Detroit police officer is guilty of a misdemeanor for causing the death of a little girl in 2010.

No one disputes that Office Joseph Weekley shot and killed Aiyana Jones when police raided her family’s home looking for a murder suspect.

He is charged with careless, reckless discharge of a firearm, causing death.

The question is whether Weekley failed to exercise “ordinary care” when he fired the shot that killed Jones.

Prosecutors argue he was negligent because he didn’t follow his extensive weapons training.

The re-trial of a Detroit police officer who killed a young girl during a May 2010 raid began Thursday.

No one disputes that Officer Joseph Weekley shot seven-year-old Aiyana Jones to death as police raided her home looking for a murder suspect.

In fact, much of what happened that night was captured on film by camera crews from the A&E reality TV show “The First 48.”

User: Frank Deanrdo / Flickr

A federal judge has given approval for the Detroit Police Department to get out from under more than 10 years of federal oversight.

The two federal consent decrees date back to 2003.

They were imposed after allegations that Detroit police subjected citizens to excessive force, false arrests and illegal detentions.

The DPD reports fatal shootings and use of force rates are both way down. And they've totally ended the practice of arresting and detaining witnesses.

The department now begins to transition out of federal oversight with an end date in 2016.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A federal judge has dismissed two federal consent decrees against the Detroit Police Department, freeing it from strict federal oversight.

The department has been monitored for compliance with the decrees since 2003, after a US Justice Department investigation found a “pattern and practice of unconstitutional policing.”

The problems included unlawfully detaining witnesses, “deplorable” holding cell conditions, and chronic use of excessive force.

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