discrimination

Law
4:31 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Civil rights, or voters' choice? Royal Oak divided over anti-discrimination law

Royal Oak's anti-discrimination law is on pause.
user Tyrone Warner Flickr

A new law in Royal Oak protecting gay and lesbian people from discrimination has hit a bump in the road.

You’ve heard that a handful of cities in Michigan have anti-discrimination ordinances that say you can't fire or deny housing to someone just because they're gay.

And Royal Oak was about to join that club when their city commissioners okayed the new law.

But 200 people recently signed a petition to put that law on hold.

Now opponents of the ordinance need some 700 signatures by April to bring it up for a city-wide vote. 

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Law
8:54 am
Sat February 23, 2013

Michigan hospital, nurses settle discrimination suit

Hurley Medical Center, Flint, Michigan
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - A Michigan hospital has settled a lawsuit that accused it of agreeing to a man's request that no black nurses care for his newborn.

Hurley Medical Center and four nurses who sued said Friday the lawsuit was "amicably resolved."

The Flint hospital says the conduct wasn't consistent with hospital policies and that it "fundamentally opposes" racial discrimination.

The suit was filed by nurse Tonya Battle, who alleged a note was posted on an assignment clipboard reading, "No African American nurse to take care of baby.

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Politics & Government
12:50 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Former Flint mayor challenges $4.5 million legal judgement in court

Former Flint Mayor Don Williamson.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

Former Flint Mayor Don Williamson is suing the city after officials demanded that he pay out $4.5 million awarded to police officers in a 2011 discrimination suit.

Williamson is arguing that city officials violated his constitutional rights when they asked a judge to require the former mayor pay the sum, Kristin Longley of the Flint Journal reports:

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Law
2:08 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Despite trespassing conviction, Holland minister won’t rule out more civil disobedience

Rev. Bill Freeman reads from his copy of the U.S. Constitution during a packed public hearing on the proposed changes to the Holland city ordinance in 2011.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A Holland minister who’s been pushing for equal protection for gay, bisexual and transgender people says he’ll consider staging another protest. That’s in spite of a jury this week convicting him of trespassing for his first protest.

Reverend Bill Freeman is upset Holland City Council voted not to add sexual orientation and gender identity to the city’s anti-discrimination laws. One night last October Freeman decided to occupy city hall to try to get city council to change its mind and join more than a dozen other Michigan cities with similar laws. He was arrested for trespassing when the building was closed that evening.

“It’s time for the City of Holland to join the 21st century,” Freeman said, referencing changes to the military’s Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy and President Obama’s recent support of gay marriage. “The City of Holland knows what the right thing is and that is not to allow discrimination of anybody,” Freeman added.

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Law
3:50 pm
Sat June 23, 2012

How do anti-discrimination laws affect your business, job, and community?

Young people march "until love is equal" in Holland last August. The march was in protest the city council's vote in June 2011 not to add gender identity and sexual orientation to the city's anti-discrimination laws.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Michigan’s Department of Civil Rights is studying how current laws and policies regarding gay and transgender people affect people’s lives, jobs, communities and businesses. Though state laws ban discrimination in housing and employment based on some factors – people who are gay or transgender are not included.

The department will hold a public hearing in Holland Tuesday.

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Politics & Government
8:21 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

Minister fighting for gay rights in Holland appears in court

In August 2011 Reverend Bill Freeman (right) is one of at least a hundred people who march to protest Holland City's Council's vote not to add sexual orientation and gender identity to its anti-discrimination laws.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

An Ottawa County judge is considering whether to dismiss a case against a minister who has stood up for gay rights in the City of Holland.

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Health
8:47 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Healthcare providers can better meet the needs of American Muslim patients

Hamed Saber Flickr

A new study sheds some light on how health care providers can better meet the cultural needs of American Muslim patients.

Michigan is home to one of the largest Muslim communities in the U.S.  Some Muslim patients report that they experience discrimination in health care settings.

Researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Michigan interviewed groups of Muslim men and women from different backgrounds attending mosques in Metro Detroit.  

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Politics
5:19 pm
Tue March 13, 2012

Muskegon considers laws protecting gay or transgender people

Protestors gathered in Lansing January 18th 2012 to speak against a new state law banning most public entities from offering benefits to same sex partners.
Nancy Gallardo Until Love Is Equal

The City of Muskegon seems likely to pass local laws protecting gay and transgender people from discrimination in housing and employment.

The state and federal government do not offer this protection, but almost 20 Michigan cities do.

Roberta King lives in Muskegon. She was "pleasantly surprised" no one opposed the local law when she asked city commission to consider it this week.

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Politics
11:36 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Holland group fighting for anti-discrimination laws accepts social justice award

Holland Is Ready leader Rev. Jen Adams accepts the City's Social Justice Award. "We smile not only because there is a little humor here, but because there is also hope here," Adams said.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

A community organization in Holland has accepted an award from the city after unsuccessfully lobbying for an anti-discrimination law there.

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Commentary
11:28 am
Fri January 6, 2012

Ban on domestic partner benefits for some, may cost more than it saves

A while ago, I heard a lecturer explain how the 1960s were a time in which there was a great cultural clash in our country. Well, you didn’t have to live through the period to know that.

Bob Dylan’s song “The Times They Are A’Changin,“ spells it out. However, I would argue that the present-day culture wars are far deeper than the days when dad yelled at junior to get a haircut, and parents worried over whether their kids were trying marijuana.

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Religion
10:58 am
Tue December 20, 2011

Muslim religious leaders file suit against airlines

A lawsuit alleges that a Delta pilot refused to fly with two men in Muslim attire despite being cleared by the TSA.
Andrey Belenko Flickr

Delta Airlines and Atlantic Southeast Airlines are being sued by two imams who were asked to leave a Delta flight last May (Atlantic Southeast contracts with Delta on some flights).

According to CNN, Masudur Rahman and Mohamed Zaghloul were cleared to board by TSA officials twice. The flight originated in Memphis and was going to Charlotte. Both men were wearing traditional Muslim attire.

The suit alleges that the pilot of the plane, after leaving the gate, returned to the gate and refused to fly with the men on aboard.

CNN reports a Delta manager tried to intervene on the men's behalf, but could not convince the pilot to fly:

From CNN:

The manager told the men that the pilot, "despite acknowledging that both plaintiffs were cleared to board, was personally objecting to the plaintiffs being on his flight. The pilot indicated that he believed the mere presence and perception of the plaintiffs on his plane would make other passengers feel uncomfortable."

Rahman and Zaghoul are seeking damages from the airlines through a trial.

Politics
5:28 pm
Thu June 16, 2011

Kalamazoo Public Safety Lt. alleges chief discriminated in promoting staff

Lieutenant Stacey Randolph alleges the chief discriminated against her in 2009 and 2010 when he promoted white male officers instead of her. The chief denied the allegations in a court filing this week.

Lieutenant Stacey Randolph is the first and only African-American female supervisor at the Kalamazoo Public Safety Department. She applied for a promotion on two separate occasions in the past two years. Both times a white male got the job. Randolph scored equal to or better than other candidates.

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