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Donald Trump

President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

President-elect Donald Trump is condemning the push to force recounts in three states pivotal to his Nov. 8 victory.

In a statement released by his transition team, Trump called the developing recount effort "a scam."

He says, "The people have spoken and the election is over."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

If you've ever driven down a pot-hole strewn road, or needed  a filter just to drink your tap water in Flint, you know just how crappy parts of Michigan's infrastructure are right now. 

Now a special commission is expected to deliver a report to the governor next week, outlining what needs to be done to address the state's growing infrastructure needs.

According to the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, the DeVos family has given roughly $14 million to political campaigns and causes over the last two years.
BetsyDeVos.com

President-elect Donald Trump has selected longtime school choice advocate Betsy DeVos to head the U.S. Department of Education. (Presidential cabinet picks are subject to Senate confirmation. See who Trump has picked for his cabinet so far with WaPo's cabinet tracker.)

Trump’s stance on education policy has, thus far, been difficult to discern. His pick of DeVos indicates how his administration likely sees education policy going forward.

Gov. Rick Snyder.
Courtesy Detroit Regional Chamber / Creative Commons -- http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder declined to endorse Donald Trump during the election. (He didn't endorse any candidate for president, according to our It's Just Politics ​team.)

And the Associated Press reported that Gov. Snyder referred to Trump's comments about women as "revolting and disgusting."

The DeYoung Power Plant in Holland.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

This year is likely to be the hottest on record. Scientists with the World Meteorological Organization announced that recently, as world leaders met in Morocco to talk about limiting the impacts of climate change.

President-elect Donald Trump has called climate change a hoax, and he’s said he’ll withdraw from the Paris climate agreement.

Andy Hoffman is a professor with the Ross School of Business and education director for the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan.

He says we don’t really know what the president-elect’s climate policy will look like.

Senator Jeff Sessions speaking at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, DC in 2011.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some Detroit leaders, clergy, and activists spoke out against Donald Trump’s pick for U.S. Attorney General on Monday, denouncing him as someone who would “take us back to the Jim Crow era.”

They said Senator Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, has a particularly bad history when it comes to African-American voting rights, and other civil rights issues.

But Rev. Paul Perez, with the Detroit conference of the United Methodist Church, says that’s not the only area of concern.

wikimedia user McZusatz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

As President-elect Trump and his team prepare for inauguration in two months, Michigan is preparing for President-elect Trump.

And Trump has outlined a number of things he'd like to do with regard to trade in his first 100 days in office.

http://www.sessions.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/official-photo

Activist groups are protesting Donald Trump's pick for Attorney General in Detroit on Monday.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Business leaders are coming to terms with the brave new Trumpworld and the hometown automakers think they may have a new ally in the White House.

Ford Motor CEO Mark Fields says the automaker’s brass is in “constant communication” with President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team.

Liesl Clark said Michigan is taking more older, coal-fired power plants offline because they are uneconomical to run.
Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Energy policy will change under the new administration and state policies in places such as Michigan are more likely to look like Trump policies than Obama polices. That's the opinion of Mark A. Barteau, the director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.

Trump has made clear statements that he believes climate change is a hoax and he plans to dismantle the Obama administration’s energy policies. This will affect gas and oil production. Trump has also said he’ll bring “clean coal” production back, but it's not certain there is market demand.

Auchter's Art: No one wants to be a sucker

Nov 18, 2016
AUCHTOON.COM

Here's a theory that might help to unify us in these difficult times: What all Americans really, really hate is to be a sucker.

Whatever else we disagree on — politics, ideology, economics, dessert toppings, the truth — a common bond is that nobody likes being a sucker.

I think that had an enormous effect on getting Trump elected.

Consider this:

Man allegedly yells 'Trump' during attack on cab driver

Nov 17, 2016
Grand Rapids
Steven Depolo / Flickr

A cab driver of East African descent has been beaten in western Michigan by a man who allegedly yelled "Trump" during the attack.
 

Grand Rapids police say Thursday that the man was arrested after the Saturday morning attack and later made discriminatory comments about the cab driver's race.

It was not clear if the man has been charged.

Reports of violence and threats toward ethnic minorities have increased since Republican Donald Trump was elected president last week.

Bill Ford at Web Summit 2015 in Dublin, Ireland
flickr user Web Summit / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

In a little over two months, Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes is digging into what that could mean for our auto industry.

“The biggest fear is that we would go backwards into fear rather than forward into hope. That we’d go backwards into polarization, not forward into unity. We’ve made an awful lot of progress in the last 50 years, and that progress is now threatened.”
Laura Weber / MPRN

 

A week ago, we woke up to the news that Donald Trump is our president-elect.

Since that day, we’ve seen a flood of reported hate incidents across the country.

Antonin / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Like their national counterparts, organizations like the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and Planned Parenthood of Michigan  have seen dramatic increases in contributions  in the week since Election Day to help them fight any efforts by the Trump administration to undermine their causes.  

"Given the very overt threats to our work and the women we serve throughout the campaign, people turned to Planned Parenthood and felt like what they could do is offer their time and their resources," said Lori Carpentier, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Michigan.

Sixteen years ago, during the campaign that led to the famous Bush-Gore disputed presidential election, I did a joint appearance with pollster Steve Mitchell, who predicted victory for George W. Bush and then-Senator Spencer Abraham in Michigan.

I said that I thought the pollster’s Republican bias was showing. He said that wasn’t true, and to prove it he regretfully predicted that Mike Rogers, a state senator then trying to be elected to Congress, was going to lose.


Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Election 2016 triggered anti-Trump protests and vigils across the country, including some on college campuses in Michigan.

For This Week in Michigan Politics, Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how schools should handle that conversation and the responsibilities of community leaders in places where post-election threats and bullying have occurred.

They also discuss Gov. Rick Snyder's trip to China and his priorities as he heads into the final two years of his term.


Gov. Rick Snyder
gophouse.com

A year after he called for a “pause” in resettling refugees from the Middle East, Governor Snyder says he’s watching and waiting to see what Donald Trump will do with immigration policy.

That includes the president-elect’s promise to cut funding to sanctuary cities. Michigan has at least two cities – Detroit and Ann Arbor – that have policies to harbor immigrations regardless of their visa status.

Courtesy Photo

For the first time in 28 years a majority of Michigan voters chose a Republican president.

Although low voter turnout in big, democratic strongholds like Flint and Detroit played a role, exit polling shows rural voters turned out in record numbers to flip Michigan for Trump.

With the first female presidential candidate on the ballot this election, it was widely expected women would turnout in large numbers for Hillary Clinton. Most did. But exit polls still show 42% of women backed Trump. White, non-college educated women voted for Trump 2 to 1.

Power plant
Courtesy of Duke Energy

President-elect Donald Trump has called global warming "a very expensive hoax," despite agreement among the vast majority of climate scientists that climate change is happening now and is mainly human-caused. Trump has also put climate change skeptic Myron Ebell in charge of his EPA transition team.

You may not have noticed, but Gov. Rick Snyder is in China this week, on what his administration is calling his sixth “investment” mission to the world’s newest economic superpower.

This particular trip is designed, the governor’s office says, to help establish Michigan’s global leadership in “autonomous vehicle technology,” which is industry-speak for cars that will drive themselves, at least to some extent.


screen grab from 60 Minutes / CBS News

Over the last week since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 Presidential Election, there have been an increase in the number of reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities.

Speaking to Lesley Stahl last night on CBS' 60 Minutes, President-elect Donald Trump addressed the recent incidents.

Trump said he was "saddened" by the news and implored people to "stop it".

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

There’s no better way to understand what lies ahead than to take a look at our history.

Gleaves Whitney sat down with us today to talk about what history might tell us about Donald Trump’s Election Day victory and the turmoil and division that’s been left in the wake of this long, tough campaign.

Graph showing racial attacks and harassment since Election Day.
Souther Poverty Law Center

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights continues to receive increased reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities following Tuesday's election.

Agustin Arbulu is the director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. He says many of the attacks are related to things President-elect Donald Trump said throughout his campaign.

“I think this election had a very negative climate for people on both sides, so it’s not surprising that there are people struggling with the result,” he says.

Protesters also chalked anti-hate messages outside Royal Oak Middle School.
Alexis Gentile / via Facebook

Protesters have taken to streets across the country to express their displeasure with President-elect Donald Trump.

That includes some who gathered to speak out and march in Metro Detroit last night.

In Royal Oak, the group gathered outside Oakland Community College was fairly small, but they did draw lots of supportive honks.

Some shared their anger over Trump’s election—and their determination to resist his policies.

Others spoke about fear of harassment and physical attacks against Muslims, immigrants and other targets of Trump’s rhetoric.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

In this Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of Election 2016, now that the dust has had time to settle.


flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Time for another look at the week in politics with Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas.

There have been protests against the election of Donald Trump around Michigan and across the nation.

Many Republicans see these protesters as little more than sore losers throwing a fit.

Courtesy of Saladin Ahmed

 

The election of Donald Trump as president is a concern for a number of people. Trump has singled out Muslims as people he wants to stop from immigrating to the United States.

A Detroit native, Saladin Ahmed is an Arab American science fiction and fantasy writer. In the past, his family has been target by Islamophobic bigots, including the burning of a community center that helped Arab immigrants. His family founded that center.

Ahmed joined us today.

AUCHTOON.COM

Earlier this week I was pulling into work when a replay of a Renee Montagne interview with the great Mel Brooks came up on Michigan Radio.

I took the the opportunity to sit in the car and listen to the entire thing. It was good timing all around. Like always, he made me laugh out loud, but he also gave me some perspective.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

A loud, dissatisfied crowd streamed through the streets in Grand Rapids Thursday night, peacefully protesting the election of Donald Trump as president. At least a thousand people participated.

After the march, people chanted at a square downtown – declaring "Trump is not my president" and "Love trumps hate."

15 year old Brian Dominguez marched with his mom Laura and little sister Daphne.

Dominquez and his family are from Michigan, but he says they’re proud of their Mexican heritage.

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