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Donald Trump

You may not have noticed, but Gov. Rick Snyder is in China this week, on what his administration is calling his sixth “investment” mission to the world’s newest economic superpower.

This particular trip is designed, the governor’s office says, to help establish Michigan’s global leadership in “autonomous vehicle technology,” which is industry-speak for cars that will drive themselves, at least to some extent.


screen grab from 60 Minutes / CBS News

Over the last week since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 Presidential Election, there have been an increase in the number of reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities.

Speaking to Lesley Stahl last night on CBS' 60 Minutes, President-elect Donald Trump addressed the recent incidents.

Trump said he was "saddened" by the news and implored people to "stop it".

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

There’s no better way to understand what lies ahead than to take a look at our history.

Gleaves Whitney sat down with us today to talk about what history might tell us about Donald Trump’s Election Day victory and the turmoil and division that’s been left in the wake of this long, tough campaign.

Graph showing racial attacks and harassment since Election Day.
Souther Poverty Law Center

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights continues to receive increased reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities following Tuesday's election.

Agustin Arbulu is the director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. He says many of the attacks are related to things President-elect Donald Trump said throughout his campaign.

“I think this election had a very negative climate for people on both sides, so it’s not surprising that there are people struggling with the result,” he says.

Protesters also chalked anti-hate messages outside Royal Oak Middle School.
Alexis Gentile / via Facebook

Protesters have taken to streets across the country to express their displeasure with President-elect Donald Trump.

That includes some who gathered to speak out and march in Metro Detroit last night.

In Royal Oak, the group gathered outside Oakland Community College was fairly small, but they did draw lots of supportive honks.

Some shared their anger over Trump’s election—and their determination to resist his policies.

Others spoke about fear of harassment and physical attacks against Muslims, immigrants and other targets of Trump’s rhetoric.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

In this Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of Election 2016, now that the dust has had time to settle.


flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Time for another look at the week in politics with Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas.

There have been protests against the election of Donald Trump around Michigan and across the nation.

Many Republicans see these protesters as little more than sore losers throwing a fit.

Courtesy of Saladin Ahmed

 

The election of Donald Trump as president is a concern for a number of people. Trump has singled out Muslims as people he wants to stop from immigrating to the United States.

A Detroit native, Saladin Ahmed is an Arab American science fiction and fantasy writer. In the past, his family has been target by Islamophobic bigots, including the burning of a community center that helped Arab immigrants. His family founded that center.

Ahmed joined us today.

AUCHTOON.COM

Earlier this week I was pulling into work when a replay of a Renee Montagne interview with the great Mel Brooks came up on Michigan Radio.

I took the the opportunity to sit in the car and listen to the entire thing. It was good timing all around. Like always, he made me laugh out loud, but he also gave me some perspective.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

A loud, dissatisfied crowd streamed through the streets in Grand Rapids Thursday night, peacefully protesting the election of Donald Trump as president. At least a thousand people participated.

After the march, people chanted at a square downtown – declaring "Trump is not my president" and "Love trumps hate."

15 year old Brian Dominguez marched with his mom Laura and little sister Daphne.

Dominquez and his family are from Michigan, but he says they’re proud of their Mexican heritage.

United States Department of Education / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Little kids have a lot of questions about the election right now. And for parents, those conversations can be painful. Or comforting. Or sometimes, just hard to navigate.

Kids learning through the election that "there are dishonest people" 

Bill Pickens is an organic farmer from Dundee who used to be an engineer. He says he and his wife have four kids under the age of 8 right now. They lost their fifth child to SIDS last year, and now, they’re pregnant again.  

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

As president of the College Republicans at the University of Michigan, Enrique Zalamea worked hard to get out the vote for Donald Trump.

He said Trump represents the American, Christian and Republican values he believes in.

President-elect Donald Trump.
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

President-elect Donald Trump won Michigan Tuesday by the narrowest margin in the state’s history.

Pollsters say rural and blue collar voters put Trump over the top by the narrowest of majorities – just over a quarter of a percentage point -- .27 percent. You’d have to go back to the 1940 election – Wendell Wilkie versus President Franklin Roosevelt – to find a margin nearly as close.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

America has a new president-elect this morning, but the jury is still out when it comes to which candidate will carry Michigan.

On this Week in Michigan Politics Doug Tribou and Jack Lessenberry talk about how Donald Trump could become the first Republican to carry the state since 1988. They also discuss Republican victories in the 1st and 7th Congressional Districts, and the Republican's sustained control of  the state House and Supreme Court.


Michigan Republicans watch returns Tuesday night.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Tuesday night’s victories came after a contentious year for Michigan’s Republican Party.

Party leaders were sharply divided for months over Donald Trump as their presidential nominee and the direction of the party.

Now State Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel admits this has been a difficult year, her first as state party chair.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The presidential candidates and their surrogates swung through Michigan on the final day before the polls opened.

President Obama was in Michigan as part of a tour of battleground states. The president tried to drum up support for Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Democratic ticket during a rally in Ann Arbor.

Obama spoke to a crowd of about nine thousand people at the University of Michigan. He told first-time voters in the audience that this year has been a strange one in politics. The president said he’s been frustrated by a lot of the news coverage of the campaign.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The major-party candidates are making a final push to win Michigan.

Both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will be stopping in Michigan, once again, between now and Election Day. In fact, Trump will be making two stops.

Trump will rally supporters this afternoon in Sterling Heights. The GOP nominee is also expected to be back late Monday night for an election eve rally.

Trump’s running mate Mike Pence will campaign in Traverse City Monday. 

Lower Community College / Creative Commons

The presidential race is not over in Michigan.

Donald Trump doesn’t think so. New polls show his 13-point gap has been narrowed to three points in just two weeks. That’s why two of his kids hit the state again. It’s why his running mate was here. It’s why Trump is looking to land here sometime over the weekend.

Hillary Clinton speaking at Detroit's Eastern Market.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Hillary Clinton was back in Michigan today. The Democratic presidential nominee made a stop at Detroit’s Eastern Market for a rally.

Clinton was greeted by thousands of spectators and several times she encouraged them to vote and even take a friend when they go to the polls.

People kept coming into the venue even after Clinton started. Clinton clearly tried to woo Detroit’s large African American population. She referenced rival Donald Trump’s lawsuit for housing discrimination and his past characterization of black life in Detroit.

JOHN AUCHTER / WWW.AUCHTOON.COM

Like most of us, I've pretty much run out of things to say about the election.

Any thoughts — from salient points to outraged rants — have been expressed.

I see many (cartoonists, commentators, Facebook posters) are settling now for "wow, what a messed up election season this has been" reflections. And that's certainly understandable.

user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

With the clock ticking down on the presidential campaign, Michigan and its 16 electoral votes are in the spotlight.

The candidates and the high-profile people campaigning for them are virtually tripping over each other as they criss-cross the state.

Yesterday Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr., former President Bill Clinton, and Bernie Sanders were in Michigan. Today, Ivanka Trump is in Rochester, and Indiana Governor Mike Pence campaigns in Portage.

And there will be more rallies tomorrow. First Pence in Lansing, and then Hillary Clinton in Detroit’s Eastern Market, and Eric Trump will work his way through Michigan.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes all this activity proves the Mitten is in play.

There is less than a week before Michigan voters go to the polls.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

High-profile allies for the Clinton and Trump campaigns will be in Michigan Wednesday. 

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-VT, will be stumping for votes for Democrat Hillary Clinton in Kalamazoo and Traverse City. Clinton will need Sanders' supporters. They gave him the win in Michigan’s presidential primary earlier this year.

Donald Trump Jr. has stops planned at college campuses in East Lansing and Allendale.  His sister, Ivanka will be meeting with a businesswomen's group in Troy on Wednesday evening.  

About 13% of Michiganders are undecided – enough to possibly make a difference this year
User: Keith Ivey / flickr

The vast majority of reputable polls show Hillary Clinton winning Michigan by pretty comfortable margins – single digits, maybe, but still comfortable.

Trump supporter Laurie Sanger came to the Grand Rapids Trump event dressed as Hillary Clinton.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Donald Trump spent part of his Halloween in Michigan. The Republican presidential candidate held rallies in Grand Rapids and the battleground area of Macomb County.

While recent polls still show Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton with a lead in Michigan, support and enthusiasm were high at the rally. Laurie Sanger got into the Halloween spirit by coming to the rally in costume. She wore an orange “jumpsuit” with Clinton’s name on the back and handcuffs on her wrist.

“I expected more Hillarys here,” Sanger said. “I didn’t know I’d be the only one.”

Campaign signs stacked against a wall in a union office.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Political parties are gearing up their “get-out-the-vote” efforts as the 2016 election enters its final days.

Unions have been a critical part of the Democratic Party’s get out the vote efforts for decades. This past week, union leaders held a get out the vote rally in Flint.

Becky Pringle is the vice president of the National Education Association. She says “they have work to do” convincing union families to support Hillary Clinton.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson spoke to a small but enthusiastic crowd in Detroit last night.

“Don’t vote for Trump ... Don’t vote for Clinton,” shouted Johnson to several hundred supporters gathered at Cobo Center.  

The crowd cheered Johnson’s calls for eliminating the U.S. Department of Education, dismantling the Department of Homeland Security and pardoning Edward Snowden. 

Before the rally, Gary Johnson told reporters his “small government” message is “resonating” with voters --  at least the ones his campaign is able to reach.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump claims there will be “large-scale voter fraud” this election. But election officials say they’re confident that will not be the case in Michigan. 

“We want to assure everyone, regardless of their political ideology or their partisan affiliation that their voice will be heard on election day and their voice will be counted,” said Fred Woodhams, a spokesman for Michigan’s Secretary of State.

Woodhams says this isn’t the first election he’s fielded these concerns, and guesses it won’t be the last.

“This whole election, it’s being rigged.” That’s the message coming from Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump. And, there are certainly some Trump supporters who believe it.

But, is there any truth to that claim? Can an election be rigged the way Trump seems to be suggesting?

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s little more than two weeks left before the November 8 election.

Recent polls have shown Democrat Hillary Clinton holding a double-digit lead in Michigan.

Stephen Neuman is the senior adviser for the Michigan coordinated campaign. 

He says they are now looking to use those poll numbers to help Democrats down the ballot.

“We are working to include targeted House races, both targeted state House and congressional races, on the various scripts we use both on the phones and at the doors,” says Neuman.

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