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Donald Trump

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s sagging poll numbers in Michigan may be behind a surprising rise in TV ad buys in one state congressional race.

Type some words like “will the Republican Party survive this election” into any search engine, and you’ll find stories predicting its coming collapse.

Without any doubt, the GOP is now being torn by an internal civil war, and most of its key figures privately or publicly have written off Donald Trump’s chances.


Clinton speaks to supporters in Detroit Monday
Rick Pluta/Michigan Public Radio

One day before the voter registration deadline in Michigan, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton says she’s going to spend the last month of the campaign delivering "a positive message."

At her campaign stop in Detroit today, Clinton laid out her economic plans, like raising the minimum wage, guaranteeing equal pay for women, and making sure students can graduate from college debt-free.

President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

 

The aftermath of last night’s presidential debate has left the Republican Party in all-out crisis mode.

An NBC-Wall Street Journal poll following the release of the tape of Donald Trump making lewd comments about women shows Hillary Clinton’s lead over Trump is now in the double digits.

House Speaker Paul Ryan today held a conference call with House Republicans. He said he can’t and won’t defend Trump, and that House Republicans should do what’s best for them in the remaining weeks of the election.

But, he will not rescind his endorsement of Trump.

What does this all mean for Republicans on the down-ballot in Michigan?

woman holding sign that says women for trump
Rick Pluta / Michigan Radio

A couple dozen Donald Trump supporters waved signs outside a rally in Detroit Monday for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Rosanne Ponkowski was one of those pro-Trump demonstrators. She carried a sign that said “Women for Trump.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Update 10:37 p.m.:

After renouncing his support of Trump, Michigan's Lt. Gov. felt Trump turned in a winning performance during the debate:

John Auchter / WWW.AUCHTOON.COM

A common question these days is, "How did it come to this? How did we end up with these presidential candidates?" The simplest answer is, "It's our fault." Would a curious, engaged, and active electorate have generated the current tickets? Probably not.

Have you ever wondered what would happen if a President of the United States went stark raving mad? As in, thinking he or she was an eggplant?

Actually, there IS a system to deal with that. As I understand it, all that would have to happen would be for the vice president and a majority of the cabinet to sign a declaration that the president was not competent, and send it to Congress.


One of the signs at the anti-Gilbert protest in downtown Detroit Monday.
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Donald Trump’s fundraiser at a Dan Gilbert-owned Detroit building raised some eyebrows last week.

It also drew a small group of protesters to the mortgage-and-real-estate tycoon’s downtown headquarters Monday.

The Reverend William Wylie-Kellerman was one of them.

Kellerman says Detroit is facing a “corporate takeover,” facilitated by the city’s bankruptcy and led by Gilbert’s mass real estate acquisitions in and around the city’s downtown.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former President Bill Clinton will campaign for Hillary Clinton in two Michigan cities on Monday.

The former president will meet with Hillary Clinton supporters in Saginaw and Flint.  

He's campaigned in Michigan before, including a brief stop in Detroit on Labor Day. 

Bill Clinton is the latest big name Democrat to campaign in Michigan in recent weeks. Since July's Democratic National Convention, Chelsea Clinton, Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine, and Democratic Presidential nominee Hilary Clinton have all made Michigan stops.

President-elect Donald Trump.
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Donald Trump’s trashing again this week of Ford Motor Company and Michigan’s economy isn’t playing well with state business leaders. That’s at least two reasons why many of them are choosing to sit out this year’s bizarre presidential race.

flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump made his fifth visit to Michigan yesterday. The candidate held a rally in the Oakland County city of Novi.

“I’m an outsider fighting for you,” Trump told the crowd. “We have a movement like they’ve never seen in this country before.”

Trump supporters wait in the rain.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is in Michigan today. People lined up in the rain hours before Trump is scheduled to speak at a venue in Oakland County.

Lisa Gustin has been to five Trump events, including one in Toledo, Ohio. This time she brought her 14-year-old son, Gabriel.

Gabriel can’t vote yet, but says he’s active because he likes the Republicans’ vice presidential candidate, Mike Pence

“I’m in it because I’ve been into politics since I was born practically.”

Republican presidential candidate at a campaign stop in Warren, Michigan.
Jake Neher / MPRN

Donald Trump is coming back to Michigan today. The Republican presidential nominee is holding a rally at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi.

Democrats are liberals, and Republicans conservatives, right?

We usually talk and think about the major parties that way, as if they were two different flavors of ice cream.

Republicans are red raspberry; Democrats, blueberry.

Republicans want lower taxes and fewer services; Democrats higher taxes and more services.

Democrats are pro-choice; Republicans anti-abortion, et cetera, et cetera.


Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

The U.S. Senate rejected a spending bill on Tuesday to keep the government running through December 9.

A majority of Democrats voted "no" because the bill didn't contain money to help Flint.

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou talk about the impact that could have on the upcoming election. They also discuss Donald Trump's Michigan references in the first presidential debate and calls to reduce recidivism from Hillary Clinton and Gov. Rick Snyder.

Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio/lawrence.house.gov

 

The first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton was held last night. A large segment of the debate was about racial healing in the United States.   

Both candidates have been pursuing African-American and Latino voters.

Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence and Linda Lee Tarver, co-chair of the Trump-Pence Michigan African American Advisory Committee, joined us today to take a look back at last night’s debate.

Trump says Ford leaving America, but company fires back

Sep 27, 2016
"For Republicans who have not distanced themselves from Trump, it may be too late," Demas told us.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

During last night's presidential debate, Donald Trump's opening statement included his remark that Michigan is losing thousands of jobs and that Ford is leaving Michigan for other countries like Mexico. 

“So Ford is leaving. You see that their small car division [is] leaving. Thousands of jobs leaving Michigan, leaving Ohio. They’re all leaving. And we can’t allow it to happen anymore,” he said.

donkey and elephant standing on american flag
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump face off in their first presidential debate tonight.

One Michigan group hopes to hear the candidates discuss “family economic” issues.

Michigan’s 1st Congressional District is huge - almost 25,000 square miles - and it is where, with the pending retirement of Republican Congressman Dan Benishek, former Marine Corps General Jack Bergman – a Republican – is facing former Michigan Democratic Party Chair Lon Johnson.

Donald Trump gets it wrong about Ford's Mexico move

Sep 17, 2016

Facts detailing how the global auto industry operates shouldn’t muck up the campaign between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Nor should they slow the candidates’ flailing efforts to score cheap political points in the industrial Midwest, right?

Yet, this week, Trump predicted the Dearborn automaker will “fire all of their employees in the United States” because it’s ending small car production in Michigan. And a CNN anchor actually asked Ford CEO Mark Fields whether the allegation is true.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new poll by Epic MRA on behalf of the Detroit Free Press and other news media outlets across the state shows that Donald Trump has cut into Hillary Clinton's lead in Michigan. 

Clinton still leads, but with 38% compared to Trump's 35%. 

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party presidential candidate, is also gaining ground with 10%.

Amariyanna Copeny, 9, of Flint, Mich. with Donald Trump
imgur.com

A picture of Donald Trump and "Little Miss Flint" has people on the internet talking.

Amariyanna Copeny, aka Little Miss Flint, and her mother Lulu Brezzell attended Trump's visit to Bethel United Methodist Church in Flint on Wednesday.

Brezzell took the picture of her daughter's encounter with Trump where the Republican presidential candidate is smiling and appears happy, while Amariyanna doesn't.

Donald Trump is lashing out against an African-American pastor who interrupted him Wednesday to chide him for campaigning in her Flint, Mich., church.

"Something was up," Trump told Fox and Friends on Thursday morning, calling the Rev. Faith Green Timmons a "nervous mess."

"I noticed she was so nervous when she introduced me," he said. "When she got up to introduce me she was so nervous, she was shaking. I said, wow, this is kind of strange. Then she came up. So she had that in mind, there's no question."

John Auchter / Michigan Radio

Who else thought when you first heard Basket of Deplorables: "That's the perfect name for a punk rock band"?

Well I definitely did, and it got me thinking.

Punk rock was in general a reaction to what rock and roll had become by the mid-1970s.

It had more or less bypassed its original audience: the young and the disaffected. Radio stations had become categorized, playlists were standardized, and established acts were given every advantage over the new and different.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump came to Flint today and toured the city's water plant.

The facility has not been operational since last fall, after the city switched back to Detroit water following a catastrophic move to pump water from the Flint River. The city failed to properly treat the river water, leading to a lead contamination crisis for the city of 100,000.  

Also in Flint yesterday, for the first time, a Michigan state employee was convicted for actions related to the water crisis. 

Tracy Samilton/Michigan Radio

Emidio "Mimi" Soltysik says his run for president under the banner of the Socialist Party USA banner is more of an organizing project than a traditional campaign.

Soltysik described that project to a group of about 20 people at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Wednesday night. With his calm and gentle demeanor, the former musician comes across more as a guru of socialism than a fiery revolutionary.

The purpose of his campaign is to get people "plugged in" to their communities, he says, not get the most votes possible.

People protesting near Flint's water plant ahead of Trump's stop there.
Rick Pluta / MPRN

Demonstrators lined a highway in Flint near the water plant today, ahead of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's visit there. Some of the demonstrators supported Trump. Many were opposed.           

Leslie Wilson blasted the timing of Trump’s visit, and the fact that no events were open to the general public.  

“It’s just ridiculous. Why he’s coming 60 days before the election. It’s ridiculous.”

 Wilson says she thinks the visit was aimed at attracting the support of skeptical moderate Republicans, and not people who live in Flint or other cities.

Senator Tim Kaine is coming to the University of Michigan on Tuesday
PROjoelrivlin/flickr commons

Senator Tim Kaine is campaigning in Ann Arbor on Tuesday afternoon.

The Democrats' pick for vice president will talk about getting out the vote, especially for younger voters.

Ann Arbor is, of course, pretty liberal leaning, and Kaine will talk to a college crowd at the University of Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lately, there have been a lot of allegations of funny business within American politics. 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has repeatedly said that the elections could be rigged. And there have been a lot of concerns that the Russians hacked the Democratic Party's emails. 

The next logical question for many people is, if both those things are true, what's to keep the election results from being hacked?

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