Education

Education
10:22 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Businessman Stephen Ross to give $200M to the University of Michigan

University of Michigan (file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - Real estate magnate and Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross plans to give $200 million to the University of Michigan for its business school and athletics programs.

The Ann Arbor school made the announcement Wednesday, saying it represents the largest single donation in the university's history. The school says the gift will "significantly transform the student experience at the business school and athletic campus."

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Education
5:46 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Michigan's preschoolers affected by federal cuts to Head Start

Washtenaw County voters approved a millage for special education in yesterday's election.
WoodleyWonderWorks Flickr

These are trying times for families who rely on Head Start to give their preschoolers the big boost that can make the difference between success and failure in school.

That's because the federal sequester cuts have made a big hit on the number of slots available to preschoolers. 

Nationwide, 57,000 kids have lost access to Head Start. And the threat of deeper cuts looms when the debt ceiling rears its head again this fall in Washington.

Robin Bozek, the executive director of Michigan Head Start Association and Mary DeLuca, the  Head Start director for the Community Action Agency of Jackson joined us in the studio to talk about how Michigan’s preschool kids are affected by the budget cuts.  

Listen to the story above.

Education
11:13 am
Tue September 3, 2013

School bells ring in new places for many Michigan students

Students from Marshall and Albion spend the morning looking for their new homerooms during the first day of school
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

It’s the first day for school for tens of thousands of Michigan students.

The drumbeat of a new school year literally began bright and early this morning in Marshall, as hundreds of students packed the school’s gymnasium.

Among them were about 140 students from Albion.   Albion school officials decided to close that district’s high school last spring to save money.

Dan Luciani is Marshall’s high school principal.  He says the transition has been going well today despite some crowded classrooms.

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Education
3:05 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

New School Year - New School District

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Tomorrow marks the beginning of the school year for tens of thousands of Michigan school children.

For many kids, the year is starting in a different school district then they attended last year.

About a thousand Inkster children will be attending classes this fall in four different Wayne County school districts. The state dissolved the Inkster public school district over the summer because of the district’s chronic financial problems.

The same thing happened to the Buena Vista school district. The bulk of its students will take classes in Saginaw classrooms.

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Education
12:00 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Uniforms: It's what all Grand Rapids students are -- or will be -- wearing

Credit Grand Rapids Public Schools

When Grand Rapids Public Schools students head back to class after the Labor Day holiday, many of them will be wearing uniforms for the first time.

The school board approved a plan last year to phase-in district-wide school uniform requirements.

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Education
1:53 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

MSU study finds victims of dating violence earn less later in life

my.hsj.org

A new Michigan State University study finds adolescent victims of dating violence pay a price later in life.

About one in three people between the ages of 14 and 20 say they've been of victims of dating violence.

The MSU research shows dating violence tended to limit women’s education

As a consequence, the women earned less money and saw less growth in their income.

MSU researcher Adrienne Adams says the study’s findings show the need for early intervention.

Education
8:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Time's running out to get 5,000 new kids to DPS

DPS built their whole budget on the bet they can lure 5,000 new kids to the district. Now, time is almost up.
User Motown31 Creative Commons

The clock’s running out for the Detroit Public School district.

School starts Tuesday, and DPS officials went into the summer with the hefty goal of recruiting 5,000 new students.

That's an awful lot of new kids, especially given that demographers predict just the opposite. They think DPS will lose students this year, like they have in the past.

It's an important goal for DPS, because even if they have the same number of students as last year, they’ll have to cut $38 million from the budget. 

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Stateside
6:05 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Do too many schools rely on gimmicks and sales pitches to attract new students?

user BES Photos Flickr

That's the question raised in a guest column in Bridge Magazine by my next guest.

Margaret Trimer Hartley is superintendent of the University Prep Science & Math Academy in Detroit . She's also the former head of communications for the Michigan Education Association. She was also an education reporter at the Detroit Free Press.

Hartley joined us today.

Listen to the audio above.

Stateside
3:55 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Fewer high school graduates means creative adjustments for colleges

There are fewer high school graduates, which means colleges have to fight over students
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Colleges and universities in Michigan have been grappling with ways to fill the revenue hole after the state Legislature cut funding for higher education. 

But now there's another problem -- fewer students. 

Brian Prescott is the director of Policy Research at the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education. The Commission recently released a major report called "Knocking at the College Door," which found that Michigan was second only to California in the decreasing number of high school graduates. 

Prescott said that's because the children of baby boomers have graduated high school, so future graduating classes are becoming smaller. 

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Education
11:08 am
Tue August 27, 2013

University of Detroit-Mercy faculty protest as contract negotiations drag on

UDM WWI Clock memorial
commons.wikimedia.org

Faculty at the University of Detroit Mercy say the university is “going backward” in ongoing contract negotiations.

Some U of D professors protested at an event attended by the school’s President Monday.

The two sides have been bargaining since late last year. Just last month, the university gave notice that it may invoke a clause to “terminate or modify” the current faculty contract in late September.

Faculty union President and Associate Professor of Physics Prasad Venugopal said faculty members are “very concerned” about that possibility.

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Stateside
5:06 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

What difference does art education really make anyway?

Keon Pearson and her son Keontay Seymour talk about the difference art education has made for Keontay at the West Michigan Center for Art and Technology.
Courtesy of the West Michigan Arts and Technology Center courtesy of WMCAT

Only a handful of public schools in Grand Rapids still offer art classes of any kind. To fill the gap, the West Michigan Center for Arts and Technology (WMCAT) offers free art education at their facility in downtown Grand Rapids.

State of Opportunity's Story Booth stopped by WMCAT this summer. The booth goes out across the state to capture stories we might not otherwise hear.

Teenagers participating in various summer art education programs shared stories about what art means to them.  

Keon Pearson and her son Keontay Seymour both came into the booth to talk to each other about how access to art education has changed Keontay and State of Opportunity's Youth Journalist Alex Wilson produced this audio postcard.

Education
2:50 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

From the school spirit files: Staff and students at alternative school say stigma is undeserved

Alternative high schools often carry a bit of a stigma.

Wavecrest Career Academy in Holland is no different.

Shelby Danielson is a senior at the school. "People think it's a bad school and it's really not," she says.

"There are so many great kids and they have so much potential, they just need that extra push from teachers and they might not get that at other schools."

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Education
11:00 am
Mon August 26, 2013

LIVE CHAT: How should Michigan teachers be evaluated?

Sharon Drummond Flickr

It sounds like a great idea.

Evaluate the teachers. Keep the good ones. Weed out the bad ones.

But how do you do this?

Your government representatives in Lansing will be debating a statewide teacher evaluation system this fall.

Here's your chance to talk to the people who put the proposal together.

The proposal was developed by the Michigan Council for Educator Effectiveness, a committee appointed by the state to develop an evaluation model. 

The model would rate teachers by both student test scores and classroom practices.

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Education
1:58 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

College dorms opening at campuses around Michigan

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Get out the laundry carts: students are returning to college dorms.

More than 7,000 freshmen at Michigan State University begin moving in Sunday while other students check in Monday. Classes start Wednesday in East Lansing.

In Marquette, classes start Monday at Northern Michigan University. Wayne State University in Detroit is welcoming freshmen on Saturday, with sophomore, juniors and seniors following on Sunday.

Stateside
5:50 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Teacher turnover is harming students, what can be done to keep them in the profession?

Research has found that nearly 50% of new teachers leave within five years.
Jennifer Guerra Michigan Radio

It's late August, and parents are taking their kids on back-to-school shopping trips. There are conversations and speculation about teacher assignments, and in some cases, questions about whether teachers will be returning in the fall.

When teachers leave a school, it hits students hard. A researcher from the University of Michigan and his colleagues studied data over an each year period and found teacher turnover harms student learning, especially in math and English.

A study by the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future estimates that teachers dropping out of the profession cost the nation around $7 billion a year.

Trying to keep teachers in the classroom and in the profession is Randi Stanulis’s mission. She is an associate professor of education at Michigan State University and she directs a teacher mentoring program that some say could ultimately serve as a national model.

Randi Stanulis joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Education
6:02 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

State data shows turnaround at consistently low performing high school in Grand Rapids

Union High School students get ready to head back to school at park parties organized by the district.
Union Red Hawks facebook page GRPS

The Grand Rapids Public School District is making strides in turning around some of its lowest performing schools. That’s according to new data released by the state Tuesday.

Ron Gorman is the Executive Director of High Schools and Alternative Education at GRPS. He works with all of Grand Rapids high schools, many of which have problems meeting state standards.

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Education
7:29 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Detroit Public Schools looks to boost enrollment with door-to-door initiative, "community schools"

DPS Emergency manager Jack Martin, right, talks with a Detroit resident.
Credit Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

The Detroit Public Schools’ emergency manager was out knocking on doors Friday.

Jack Martin canvassed the neighborhood near Thurgood Marshall elementary school—his own alma mater--in an ongoing effort to boost the district’s enrollment.

Martin says the only way to “sustain” the district—still burdened with a $76 million deficit after more than 5 years of emergency financial managers-- is to lure more Detroit students back to traditional public schools.

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Education
3:41 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Flint schools to modify search policy

Credit safezone.in

The Flint School District is changing its student search policy.

Flint students will still have to walk through metal detectors when school begins next month.

But the American Civil Liberties Union objected to the district's plan to allow students and their backpacks or purses to be searched without cause.

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Education
12:19 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

No more 7th hour tuition fees for Ann Arbor high schools

Wikimedia Commons

The Ann Arbor Board of Education voted to remove the $100 tuition it planned to charge students wanting to take a seventh hour class at Huron and Pioneer High Schools this year.

Glenn Nelson is the treasurer of the Ann Arbor Board of Education and was the first to suggest the tuition-based seventh hour program.

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Stateside
5:30 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

How should Michigan teachers be evaluated?

The Highland Park school district is almost out of cash. The state is working on a solution to keep kids in school.
user alkruse24 Flickr

There are several complicated questions surrounding teacher evaluations in Michigan. Should there be a state standard for evaluating teachers? What should that evaluation encompass? Should teacher pay be pegged to the evaluation, the pay for performance system?

The Michigan council for educator effectiveness spent nearly 2 years and $6 million on a pilot program in 13 districts, and they’ve now come out with a recommendation for a new statewide teacher evaluation tool.

Jake Neher is the Lansing reporter for the Michigan Public Radio Network. He joined us in the studio today to discuss the issue.

Listen to the full interview above.

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