Education

Education
3:55 pm
Sun November 18, 2012

Board being named for Ypsilanti-Willow Run schools

A school board will be appointed Monday for the merging Ypsilanti and Willow Run school districts.

Read more
Education
2:03 pm
Sun November 18, 2012

Rewriting Michigan's funding plan for education

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - A proposal that Gov. Rick Snyder commissioned to overhaul Michigan's education system would let students take their public funding to any district that will accept them, enroll in state-funded online learning courses and get $2,500 in scholarship money for each semester they graduate early from high school.

The Detroit Free Press says a group that Michigan's Republican governor asked to propose revisions to the state's K-12 school finance system will release a draft of its bill Monday.

Read more
That's What They Say
8:04 am
Sun November 18, 2012

Hello, pronoun...are you singular?

Listen to full interview above.

“People tell me that the pronoun ‘they’ cannot be singular. But here’s the thing - it already is,” says Anne Curzan. She’s a professor of English at the University of Michigan who specializes in linguistics.

Most speakers already use “they” as a singular pronoun in speech.

“In writing, we are told to use ‘he’ or ‘she,’ or change the whole sentence,” Curzan says.

English teachers have been telling us for years that “they” is not a singular pronoun. But, Curzan offers a few examples of indefinite pronouns that speakers make singular.

Read more
Education
5:48 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Will minority enrollment increase after federal court ruling?

A 2006 BAMN rally in Lansing against Proposal 2. The proposal was passed by Michigan voters that November.
BAMN

On Thursday, the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Michigan’s 2006 constitutional ban on affirmative action unconstitutional.

Some argue that the ruling will have a major impact on minority enrollment at the state’s public universities.

Monica Smith, a lawyer opposed to the affirmative action ban, began attending Wayne State Law School a year before it took effect, MLive reports.

The following year, the number of incoming black students was cut in half, Smith says.

She thinks this recent court ruling should transform the admissions process:

"This means a lot to me," said Smith. "This means that my brother, my cousins, other people in Detroit, the Latino and black students can go to Wayne State Law School and Medical School."

"I graduated from the University of Michigan. I graduated from Wayne State Law School. My brother graduated from Michigan State University. All because of affirmative action," she said. "I am 100 percent a product of affirmative action. Not because I'm not 100 percent qualified to be there. But because all three of those universities couldn't discriminate against me or my brother or other similarly situated people."

Despite yesterday’s victory, Smith and other opponents of the ban will have to wait before they see any significant changes.

Read more
Education
2:57 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Charter school enrollment rising

kakisky MorgueFile

The number of Michigan students who attend charter schools is rising. 

There are 277 charter schools in Michigan, and that number could grow.

Dan Quisenberry is president of the Michigan Association of Public School Academies.

He says five Michigan cities now rank in the top 20 for the percentage of students enrolled in charter schools.

Read more
Education
3:17 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Flint Schools superintendent to retire; board says deficit may be bigger than predicted

Flint School District Superintendent Linda Thompson.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

The superintendent of Flint Public Schools is stepping down. 

Linda Thompson took the helm of the troubled Flint school district in 2008.

The district was hemorrhaging red ink, had a shrinking school population  and poor academic performance.

Read more
Education
1:12 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

Report: Job market "sluggish" for new Michigan college graduates

Michigan State University students on the East Lansing campus
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan college graduates are entering a sluggish job market.

Michigan State University’s annual Recruiting Trends report finds employers are not confident about the nation’s economic direction in 2013.    Many are worried about problems with Europe’s economy.   There’s also concern about the nation's deeply divided political leadership.   That's all putting a damper on employers’ hiring plans.

Phil Gardner is the director of MSU’s College Employment Research Institute.

Read more
Education
5:56 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Detroit teachers' union sues over evaluations, layoffs

The Detroit Federation of Teachers is suing the city's public school system on behalf of more than 400 teachers the union says were laid off improperly.

Detroit Public Schools used a new evaluation system this year, following changes to Michigan's teacher tenure law that allow districts to call back laid-off teachers without using seniority as the first factor.

The union says the system the district came up with is not fair or transparent. And Detroit Federation of Teachers President Keith Johnson says on top of that, the school system didn't even follow its own rules when it came time to decide who would be called back to work.

Johnson says the lawsuit seeks any remedy available under the law.

"That would include reinstatement, it could include punitive damages, because there are some teachers who have had their lives literally turned upside down."

The school district did not comment directly on the lawsuit. But in a statement, it says the evaluation system ensured the most highly effective teachers would be placed in every classroom.

Education
4:27 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

MSU creating Global Center for Food Systems Innovation

Michigan State University is creating a Global Center for Food Systems Innovation thanks to a 25 million dollar award.

The award comes from US AID, the federal agency overseeing foreign assistance to developing countries.

MSU will fund research targeting improved agriculture production and cost effective, sustainable solutions for developing areas of the world. 

Read more
Education
3:48 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

Stateside: Education Achievement Authority faces loss of Detroit Public Schools

The EAA will await the news concerning the Detroit Board of Education's contract
User Motown31 Creative Commons

Last night, the Detroit Board of Education voted to break their contract and pull out of the Education Achievement Authority.

The Board’s decision will greatly affect the EAA, whose initial goal was to provide educational care to struggling schools throughout Michigan.

Don Heller, Dean of the College of Education at Michigan State University, insists the Detroit Schools’ exit will greatly disrupt the EAA.

“If the Detroit Public Schools pull out of the EAA it will be a major blow,” said Heller.

Michelle Richard, who specializes in Educational Policy at Public Sector Consultants, echoed Heller’s remarks.

“My biggest concern is in the short-term and in lending legitimacy to the EAA’s effort, this just causes more confusion. The legislature is currently looking at codifying the EAA and are looking at how they could continue to expand this effort state-wide,” said Richard.

Listen to the audio above or to our podcast to hear more about the state of the EAA.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Education
8:30 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Wayne State University to search for new president

Credit User: ellenm1 / flickr

The Wayne State University Board of Governors is expected to vote Monday to establish a search committee for a new president. The university needs to replace Allan Gilmour, who plans to retire when his two-year contract is up in June.

Gilmour is credited with making the school's admissions standards more rigorous, after criticism that it admitted students who couldn't succeed. But his successor will still have some work to do. According to the Web site college results dot org, fewer than a third of Wayne State students graduate within six years.

Read more
Education
4:24 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

Homeless Awareness Week

Credit cdc.gov / cdc.gov

Homeless Awareness Week in Michigan is November 10-18. The idea is to highlight the causes of homelessness and the issues that homeless people face. There are events planned in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Lansing, Port Huron, and other towns.

In Livingston County a group of people will live in their cars for 24 hours and eat only what they can buy with about $5 in food stamps, in order to raise awareness.

Read more
Education
12:43 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

The new model for struggling schools? With state backing, Ypsilanti and Willow Run merge

In choice between consolidation or state takeover, voters choose to merge districts
Sarah Hulett Michigan Radio

Cash-strapped school districts, heads up: the state's hoping you'll take a page out of Ypsilanti's and Willow Run's book.

On Tuesday, voters approved what school reps (and even some students) say is a critical, if dramatic, step: consolidating districts.

It means big cuts and layoffs, but administrators desperately hope it'll also hit the reset button for two struggling communities. 

Read more
Education
12:09 am
Fri November 2, 2012

Grand Rapids students and neighbors push back on new “transformation plan” for schools

2012 Creston grad Angelique Long, Senior Saryane Ward, and Freshman Toni Cortazar (left to right) speak out against closing Creston High School Thursday night.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

On Thursday night hundreds of parents and students got their first chance to respond to a "transformation plan" for the Grand Rapids Public School district. The plan unveiled Monday includes closing ten schools.

There was a lot of push back, even tears at times in the auditorium at Creston High School; the only high school slated to be shut down.

“Honestly, it feels like the board is giving up on us,” Creston High School freshman Toni Cortazar said.

Read more
Education
5:59 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

ACLU's "right to read" lawsuit moving forward

The ACLU says the state knew about big problems, and didn't do enough to help
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

A Wayne County judge says the ACLU can move ahead with its lawsuit against Highland Park schools.

That suit claims children in Highland Park are being denied the "right to read," and that the state is ultimately responsible.  It's getting national attention for what could be wide repercussions. 

Lawyers for the ACLU say the state and the district knew about major problems, like less than 10 percent of Highland Park middle and elementary students testing at grade level in reading or math.  In reading alone, they're often four to eight grade levels behind.

Read more
Education
8:40 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Grand Rapids schools unveils “transformation plan”- includes closing 10 schools

Supt. Teresa Weatherall Neal (right) discusses the transformation plan with the school board Monday night.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

The Grand Rapids Public School district would close 10 schools under a new “transformation plan” unveiled Monday night.

Over the past decade GRPS has lost 7,000 students; dropping it to the fifth largest district in the state. Along with the loss of students, Grand Rapids Public Schools has cut more than $100 million and closed 25 schools. But almost half its buildings are still way below capacity and the graduation rate is only 47-percent. 

Read more
Education
5:10 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Sorry, Harvard: UM gets most Fulbright awards

Fulbright recipient Emefah Loccoh with children in Togo, where she's studying HIV/AIDS. (Photo courtesy of Emefah Loccoh)
University of Michigan

How do you like them apples? Once again, the University of Michigan gets the nerd bragging rights for receiving more Fulbright Grants than any other school this year.

Forty Michigan students received the grants, a school record. Harvard’s in second with 31.

Besides the ego boost, Michiganders get to work in dozens of countries, researching everything from healthcare to Chinese sculpture.

Andrea Ubriel Goldner is studying landscape architecture in Morocco.

Read more
Education
8:56 am
Mon October 29, 2012

40 University of Michigan students get Fulbright grants for 2012-13

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - The University of Michigan says 40 of its students have received Fulbright grants from the State Department for overseas education.

The Ann Arbor school announced Monday that more of the grants were awarded to its students than any other U.S. institution for the 2012-13 academic year. Harvard University is second with 31 recipients, and Brown University is third with 29.

Michigan says this marks the sixth time in the past eight years it has held that honor. It also led the nation in Fulbrights in 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011.

Read more
Education
5:26 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

New Public Safety and Security Division at U of M

Steven Jenson is a former University of Michigan Hospital pediatric resident. He was charged in federal court with receipt and possession of child pornography.

The University of Michigan has consolidated police and security departments into one division of Public Safety and Security.

U of M Police Chief Jo Piersante is now the interim executive director for the division of Public Safety and Security. Campus Police, Hospital Security and Housing Security all now report to him.

This new division is a direct result of last week's report to the Board of Regents detailing how a pediatrician in training continued working with children for six months after another resident reported him for viewing child pornography in a staff area.

Read more
Education
11:35 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Michigan racetrack to become place of environmental education

7th grade students from Dundee board buses at Michigan International Speedway as part of the new Track and Explore program
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Michigan school children will soon study nature at a place many people might find surprising: Michigan International Speedway.

The auto racing track hosts crowds in excess of 100 thousand when NASCAR comes to Brooklyn twice each summer.

But Adrian College biology professor Jeff Lake says the other 50 weeks of the year, the track's campgrounds are ideal for exploring the ecosystems of the Irish Hills.

Read more

Pages