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Education

EMU's interim president is leaving in January

Dec 4, 2015
Eastern Michigan University
krossbow / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Kim Schatzel had already served as Eastern Michigan University's provost for several years, when she stepped in as interim president last summer.

Now, she's getting ready to leave for a new job as president of Towson University in Maryland.

Schatzel, who was raised on the east coast, said Towson is similar to EMU in size, curriculum and history.

However, there's one key difference.

Michigan Radio

We're going to go out on a limb here and say most parents want to know how their child's school measures up in terms of standardized test scores, graduation rates, demographics and so on. 

Another big question parents ask when looking at a school: 

“How many kids are in a typical classroom?”

When you hear people talk about ineffective school systems, you’ll often hear something like, “there aren’t enough desks or books,” or “there are more than 30 kids in that classroom.”

hmm360 / morgueFile

The Michigan Postsecondary Credential Attainment workgroup wants more people in Michigan to obtain some type of post-secondary credential by 2025.

That's according to a report the workgroup released this week.

amsd2dth / flickr creative commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A bill has cleared the Michigan Senate to address a shortage of substitute teachers and of full time teachers in certain subjects. 

A law allowing teachers who retired after the middle of 2010 to teach again without losing their pensions or health benefits expired almost 18 months ago.  The bill would reinstate, until July 1, 2018, the expired provisions. 

University of Michigan Health System

Michigan veterans would be eligible for grants to help them earn a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math under a new bipartisan bill in the state House.

If the bill becomes law, eligible veterans could receive up to $5,000 a year toward a STEM degree at a public university or community college in Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan State University will release plans later today to show it is trying to address the needs of African-American students. 

But some black Spartans feel the university is not doing enough.

Math flashcards
Ross Belmont / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Wayne State University is getting a $1.4 million grant to prepare elementary and middle school math teachers to teach in Detroit.

The grant from the National Science Foundation's Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program will help WSU recruit and train 56 new math teachers to teach in Detroit classrooms.

Tim Lauer / flickr creative commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Rockford Public Schools has notified elementary school parents about a short mention of a gay character in a book that will be available at its upcoming Scholastic Book Fair.

According to the district's Nov. 10 letter to parents, the plot of the story has a very brief reference to one of the featured characters traveling 20 years into the future to find he is married to another man. The book is the 12th in the Captain Underpants series and is titled "Captain Underpants and The Sensational Saga of Sir-Stinks-A-Lot." 

Tulane Public Relations / Creative Commons

Michigan school districts will implement new science standards over the next seven years.

The State Board of Education overwhelmingly adopted the new standards on Tuesday.

The Michigan Union covered in blooming ivy
Wikimedia Commons

Students, faculty and staff talked about their frustrations – from who gets tenure, to recruiting Detroit students, to what it feels like to be one of the few black students on campus – at a "community assembly” on campus diversity today.

The event was moderated by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clarence Page, of the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board. Community members were invited to share their own experiences and goals for the university.

Detroit schools' budget deficit smaller than expected

Nov 10, 2015
The former Carstens Elementary School building, on Detroit's east side, is one of many, many schools that have been shuttered in Detroit.
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

A recent audit showed the Detroit Public Schools' deficit for the 2014-15  fiscal year is smaller than originally projected.

DPS officials said they had expected the annual deficit to be in the range of $70 million. But the audit puts it at $46.5 million, more than $22 million less.

Michigan kids may soon be required to learn engineering

Nov 9, 2015
Tommy Cohn, a junior at Skyline High School, teaches a few students about motors.
Gabrielle Emanuel/Michigan Radio

Biology, chemistry, physics, these traditional science classes may soon be getting a new bedfellow, engineering.

On Tuesday, Michigan’s State Board of Education is voting on new science standards that would, for the first time, require students to learn engineering. This is prompting both excitement and concern.

stevendepolo / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

  A successful program that rewards students with cash for boosting their grades has expanded to a second high school in Westland, Michigan. Bill Gray, a retired school psychologist with Wayne Memorial High School, started the Champions of Wayne program in 2009 with the goal of improving performance of at-risk students.

The program offers mentorship and a $200 reward each semester to each students who successfully increase their grade point averages. 

Bills to protect K-12 student data advance in Lansing

Nov 5, 2015
Kjetil Korslian / flickr creative commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Legislation to safeguard the privacy of student information has passed the Michigan Senate.

One bill would bar the State and school districts from selling personally identifiable information in K-12 student educational records to for-profit businesses.  

(courtesy of KQED)

Schools districts across Michigan will have to adhere to new standards for evaluating teachers and administrators. Gov. Rick Snyder signed a bill on Thursday meant to improve teacher evaluation practices across the state.

Supporters of Senate Bill 103 say it will make sure bad teachers are held accountable. But they say it will also protect good teachers.

Survey: Detroiters want more school choice

Nov 4, 2015
From a Detroit classroom
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Seventy five percent of Detroiters think Detroit parents need more school choices for their children.

That's according to a recent poll of 600 Detroit residents, nearly half of whom are parents of school-aged children. It was commissioned by the Michigan Association of Public School Academies, which represents charter schools.

Grand Rapids Community College

Grand Rapids Community College and Central Michigan University have agreed to create transparent curricular paths to help GRCC students transfer to CMU. 

The institutional agreement is a first step toward program-specific agreements, which will map out what classes the community college students need to take to transfer to CMU programs.

The program agreements will appear as academic programs in the GRCC catalog and will be eligible for financial aid, according to GRCC.

Dohn Hoyle, the director of public policy of The Arc: "There's not been anything that we've seen ... that leads us to believe that the governor's original [mental health funding] plan makes any sense."
Matthileo/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Several hundred demonstrators chanted “enough is enough” at a state Capitol rally opposing Governor Rick Snyder’s proposed reorganization of the Detroit Public Schools.

  

The rally was organized by the teachers union, which brought in members by the busload to protest and to lobby state lawmakers.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan schools that are failing academically are the focus of a series of legislative hearings kicking off this week.

State Senator Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair, chairs the Senate Education committee. He says the state has spent time focusing on developing an early warning for school districts facing financial problems.

Hallway in Huron High School in Ann Arbor.
user rosefirerising / Flickr

The Ann Arbor Public Schools is trying new tactics to deal with a “chronic” lack of enough substitute teachers.

Starting this month, the district will up sub pay from $75 to $100 a day. Officials also plan to raise pay rates for classroom assistants, though those rates haven’t been set yet.

The district will also try and assemble a team of “premier” substitutes, says Ann Arbor schools’ spokesman Andrew Cluley.

Lawmakers are not happy about the time it took for state education officials to release the latest round of standardized test results.

Students struggled in all grades and subjects on the new M-STEP test which replaced the MEAP.

That was expected. But lawmakers didn’t expect it to take six months to get that data.

Our host for last night's Issues and Ale, ABC Microbrewery, sits just off of the Eastern Michigan University campus in Ypsilanti. Plus, Washtenaw Community College and the University of Michigan are right down the road. 

So it came as no surprise that our audience had a lot to contribute to our Issues and Ale discussion about college access and affordability.

Buckets and sandcastles on the beach
Jerry / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A state Senate bill that would allow schools to start before Labor Day is drawing concern from Michigan's tourism industry.

Michigan schools are currently required to wait until after the holiday to start.

That's thanks to a 2006 law meant to help boost the state's tourism industry.

Steve Yencich is president and CEO of the Michigan Lodging and Tourism Association.

Michigan state Capitol
User: mattileo / flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The emergency manager of the Detroit school district took a trip to Lansing today to ask state lawmakers for help. Darnell Earley was hoping to win support for Governor Rick Snyder’s plan to bail out the district.

  

Earley told the state House budget subcommittee on K-12 school spending that the district’s massive debt is standing in the way of improving academic performance and fixing the business side of the operation.

test with bubble answers
User Alberto G. / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan students struggled with the state’s new standardized test.

The Michigan Department of Education on Tuesday released the first results from Michigan’s new M-STEP test which replaced the MEAP.

Working World / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A new report from Wayne State University says Michigan's schools need to do more to combat bullying.

The report finds more than half of Michigan students feel bullying is still a problem in their school.

Nicole Plater documents her son's injuries in a thick binder.
Gabrielle Emanuel / Michigan Radio

UPDATED on 10-27-15 at 9:00 am  

In the mid-afternoon, Nicole Plater stands by the front door of her gray-blue mobile home in Wixom. She’s watching for her son’s school bus.

Andy is 11 years old and recently started at a new school.

“He's been, you know, not getting injured at the new school,” Plater says. “I’m so excited and he’s actually happy there.”

This week, we aired a State of Opportunity special, Life after High School. The show focused on the options open to young people trying to figure out how to build a future for themselves. We spent some time talking about the challenge and expense of attending a university or college.

But for young people in the foster care system or students who have experienced homelessness, that leap to college is even bigger.

The Michigan Union covered in blooming ivy
Wikimedia Commons

University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel announced an ambitious new program today to increase diversity in the pool of students applying for admission.

The program, called Wolverine Pathways, will be launched in January for 7th and 10th grade students in Southfield and Ypsilanti. It will be offered in a series of eight-week sessions throughout the year, and will focus on academics and other activities like field trips, campus visits and internships. 

Ryan Stanton / Flickr Creative Commons / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

UPDATED: 8:35 am on 10/22/2015 The federal government paid at least $1.7 million to 25 Michigan charter schools  that never opened, according to a report released this week by the Center for Media and Democracy (CMD).

The Wisconsin-based media group "conducts in-depth investigations into corruption and the undue influence of corporations on media and democracy," according to their website.

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