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Election 2016

Here you'll find the latest election coverage from Michigan Radio. Scroll below for information and stories. 

Teachers unions and others rallied for more public school funding before classes this morning in Detroit, Kalamazoo and Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Teachers unions held early morning rallies today at schools across Michigan.

Teachers and others took part in so-called ‘walk-in’ events in Detroit, Kalamazoo and Flint. Similar rallies took place in more than 70 cities nationwide. 

Before sunrise, a steady line of buses dropped students off at Flint’s Northwestern High School. As students stepped off buses, they were greeted by people carrying signs calling for more public money for traditional public schools.

For many years, few people paid any attention to the politics of Michigan Supreme Court justices. Nor were elections for the state’s highest court usually exciting.

That’s because there used to be a presumption that judges were more or less above politics, and that once on the bench, they should remain there as long as they were honest and competent, until the magic age of 70, after which, under the Michigan Constitution, they may finish a current term, but are no longer eligible to run again.


mayor virg bernero at microphone with crowd behind him
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lansing officials are stepping up efforts to pass a renewal of the capital city’s public safety millage in next month’s election.

The millage was first approved by Lansing voters in 2011. The intent was to replace the millions of dollars the city lost in property tax revenues after property values fell sharply during the Great Recession. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders will be in Michigan tomorrow urging voters to elect Hillary Clinton and defeat Donald Trump. 

The Clinton campaign says Sanders will talk about how Secretary Clinton's economic plan will work for everyone, and how Donald Trump's plan will instead benefit the very wealthy.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

We kicked off our first Issues & Ale event of the election season Monday night at the Beer Grotto in Lansing.

Vice presidential candidates Republican Mike Pence (L) and Democrat Tim Kaine (R).
wikimedia commons

Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence are squared off in the vice-presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on Tuesday, October 4.

It was the only vice-presidential debate before Election Day.

(By the way, you have until Tuesday, October 11 to register to vote if you haven't done so already. Find out how here.)

Have you ever wondered what would happen if a President of the United States went stark raving mad? As in, thinking he or she was an eggplant?

Actually, there IS a system to deal with that. As I understand it, all that would have to happen would be for the vice president and a majority of the cabinet to sign a declaration that the president was not competent, and send it to Congress.


Bill Clinton in Flint.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Former president Bill Clinton was made stops in Flint and Metro Detroit today on behalf of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

In downtown Flint he spoke to a crowd of just under 500 in a ballroom. His focus was on Hillary Clinton’s plans for the economy and job creation.

Life-long Flint resident Anthanette Taylor was lined up to see the former president hours before he was scheduled to start.

Taylor says she is ready to vote for Hillary Clinton, but wanted to hear what Bill Clinton had to say.

Campaign signs
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

People complain about political ads, robo-calls interrupting dinner, and mailboxes full of campaign literature.

But there’s another sign of election season: political yard signs. Candidates love them. Political consultants say they’re a waste of time and money.

Governor Rick Snyder is not on the ballot this year but he is using Election 2016 to burnish his image and protect his legacy.  

Map of Michigan's 1st congressional district.
Map USDOI shape file by user 7partparadigm / Wikimedia Commons

Most Michigan congressional districts are drawn to favor one party over another.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former President Bill Clinton will campaign for Hillary Clinton in two Michigan cities on Monday.

The former president will meet with Hillary Clinton supporters in Saginaw and Flint.  

He's campaigned in Michigan before, including a brief stop in Detroit on Labor Day. 

Bill Clinton is the latest big name Democrat to campaign in Michigan in recent weeks. Since July's Democratic National Convention, Chelsea Clinton, Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine, and Democratic Presidential nominee Hilary Clinton have all made Michigan stops.

President-elect Donald Trump.
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Donald Trump’s trashing again this week of Ford Motor Company and Michigan’s economy isn’t playing well with state business leaders. That’s at least two reasons why many of them are choosing to sit out this year’s bizarre presidential race.

Gary Johnson
Gage Skidmore / creative commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Before U.S. lawmakers left town this week, the House approved a funding bill that includes $170 million for Flint. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about what needs to happen to get the bill passed once lawmakers return after Election Day. They also talk about Donald Trump's fifth visit to Michigan since he was named the Republican presidential nominee, and The Detroit News' surprising endorsement of Libertarian Gary Johnson for president. 


Trump supporters wait in the rain.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is in Michigan today. People lined up in the rain hours before Trump is scheduled to speak at a venue in Oakland County.

Lisa Gustin has been to five Trump events, including one in Toledo, Ohio. This time she brought her 14-year-old son, Gabriel.

Gabriel can’t vote yet, but says he’s active because he likes the Republicans’ vice presidential candidate, Mike Pence

“I’m in it because I’ve been into politics since I was born practically.”

“While the Democratic Party is fundamentally a group coalition, the Republican Party can be most accurately characterized as the vehicle of an ideological movement," Grossmann writes.
flickr user DonkeyHotey / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

This election year has a lot of people scratching their heads.

Many just can’t wrap their heads around how or why two people who are not that well liked - according to the polls - are the nominees of the major parties.

And it seems that Republicans and Democrats just can’t understand why the people in the opposite party think the things they do.

There’s a new book that looks at how the parties and their supporters are different and tries to help make sense of American politics today.

The book is Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats, written by David Hopkins and Matt Grossmann.

Republican presidential candidate at a campaign stop in Warren, Michigan.
Jake Neher / MPRN

Donald Trump is coming back to Michigan today. The Republican presidential nominee is holding a rally at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi.

Flickr user Keith Kissel / Flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Detroit News broke its 143-year tradition today of endorsing the Republican candidate for president by endorsing Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.

Democrats are liberals, and Republicans conservatives, right?

We usually talk and think about the major parties that way, as if they were two different flavors of ice cream.

Republicans are red raspberry; Democrats, blueberry.

Republicans want lower taxes and fewer services; Democrats higher taxes and more services.

Democrats are pro-choice; Republicans anti-abortion, et cetera, et cetera.


If Donald Trump is to be elected President, he almost certainly has to win either Michigan or Pennsylvania.

If Trump carries every state Mitt Romney won and adds Ohio, Florida and Iowa, he still loses – unless he can take Michigan or Pennsylvania away from the Democrats.

So far this year, polls show he may have a better chance here.

Hillary Clinton leads in Michigan, but by less than in Pennsylvania and by far less than President Obama won the state either time. But Republicans in Congress are now doing something that may torpedo any chance Trump has of flipping this state this year.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

The U.S. Senate rejected a spending bill on Tuesday to keep the government running through December 9.

A majority of Democrats voted "no" because the bill didn't contain money to help Flint.

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou talk about the impact that could have on the upcoming election. They also discuss Donald Trump's Michigan references in the first presidential debate and calls to reduce recidivism from Hillary Clinton and Gov. Rick Snyder.

Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio/lawrence.house.gov

 

The first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton was held last night. A large segment of the debate was about racial healing in the United States.   

Both candidates have been pursuing African-American and Latino voters.

Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence and Linda Lee Tarver, co-chair of the Trump-Pence Michigan African American Advisory Committee, joined us today to take a look back at last night’s debate.

Trump says Ford leaving America, but company fires back

Sep 27, 2016
"For Republicans who have not distanced themselves from Trump, it may be too late," Demas told us.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

During last night's presidential debate, Donald Trump's opening statement included his remark that Michigan is losing thousands of jobs and that Ford is leaving Michigan for other countries like Mexico. 

“So Ford is leaving. You see that their small car division [is] leaving. Thousands of jobs leaving Michigan, leaving Ohio. They’re all leaving. And we can’t allow it to happen anymore,” he said.

donkey and elephant standing on american flag
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump face off in their first presidential debate tonight.

One Michigan group hopes to hear the candidates discuss “family economic” issues.

It’s like November in September as absentee ballots in Michigan are in the mail and, for some, voting has already begun.

If history is any guide, about a quarter of Michigan voters will vote using an absentee ballot, even though some will probably lie to do it because not everyone can legally cast an absentee ballot in Michigan.

Auchter's Art
JOHN AUCHTER / AUCHTOON.COM

Listen, if you got yourself a big ol’ pot of roiling outrage going right now, I’m not the one to tell you to take it off the heat.

It’s election season and who am I to talk you out of the delicious indulgence of indignation? I’m an editorial cartoonist, for crying out loud!

Inside the Michigan Capitol looking up at the dome.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan legislators are turning their attention from away lawmaking to campaigning.

State lawmakers have a couple days on their calendar next month, but for the most part, Michigan legislators will be busy campaigning.

But as state lawmakers leave Lansing, there’s still more to do on the legislative agenda.

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley says it’s a common problem nearing the end of a legislative term. State lawmakers leave to campaign for re-election and leave thousands of bills waiting for action.

You might think, some days, that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were actually running for president of Michigan.

Trump has been to the state repeatedly, and will be in nearby Toledo for the second time in the last few weeks today.

Chelsea Clinton, the candidate’s only child, will be campaigning and fundraising in Lansing, Grand Rapids and Flint Thursday and Friday. You might think they are paying a lot of attention to one medium-sized state that has only 16 of the 270 needed electoral votes.

Michigan’s 1st Congressional District is huge - almost 25,000 square miles - and it is where, with the pending retirement of Republican Congressman Dan Benishek, former Marine Corps General Jack Bergman – a Republican – is facing former Michigan Democratic Party Chair Lon Johnson.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new poll by Epic MRA on behalf of the Detroit Free Press and other news media outlets across the state shows that Donald Trump has cut into Hillary Clinton's lead in Michigan. 

Clinton still leads, but with 38% compared to Trump's 35%. 

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party presidential candidate, is also gaining ground with 10%.

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