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Election 2016

Here you'll find the latest election coverage from Michigan Radio. Scroll below for information and stories. 

Donald Trump is lashing out against an African-American pastor who interrupted him Wednesday to chide him for campaigning in her Flint, Mich., church.

"Something was up," Trump told Fox and Friends on Thursday morning, calling the Rev. Faith Green Timmons a "nervous mess."

"I noticed she was so nervous when she introduced me," he said. "When she got up to introduce me she was so nervous, she was shaking. I said, wow, this is kind of strange. Then she came up. So she had that in mind, there's no question."

John Auchter / Michigan Radio

Who else thought when you first heard Basket of Deplorables: "That's the perfect name for a punk rock band"?

Well I definitely did, and it got me thinking.

Punk rock was in general a reaction to what rock and roll had become by the mid-1970s.

It had more or less bypassed its original audience: the young and the disaffected. Radio stations had become categorized, playlists were standardized, and established acts were given every advantage over the new and different.

Tracy Samilton/Michigan Radio

Emidio "Mimi" Soltysik says his run for president under the banner of the Socialist Party USA banner is more of an organizing project than a traditional campaign.

Soltysik described that project to a group of about 20 people at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Wednesday night. With his calm and gentle demeanor, the former musician comes across more as a guru of socialism than a fiery revolutionary.

The purpose of his campaign is to get people "plugged in" to their communities, he says, not get the most votes possible.

Libertarian candidate for President Gary Johnson.
Gary Johnson for President 2016

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson pitched his vision for the country to the Detroit Economic Club Wednesday.

Johnson is for limited federal government across the board — free trade, lower taxes, loosened drug laws, fewer immigration restrictions, and more judicious use of military power.

But Johnson says the government does have a role to play when it comes to providing basic protections for citizens.

People protesting near Flint's water plant ahead of Trump's stop there.
Rick Pluta / MPRN

Demonstrators lined a highway in Flint near the water plant today, ahead of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's visit there. Some of the demonstrators supported Trump. Many were opposed.           

Leslie Wilson blasted the timing of Trump’s visit, and the fact that no events were open to the general public.  

“It’s just ridiculous. Why he’s coming 60 days before the election. It’s ridiculous.”

 Wilson says she thinks the visit was aimed at attracting the support of skeptical moderate Republicans, and not people who live in Flint or other cities.

Democrats in Michigan are breathing a sigh of relief now that the fight over straight-ticket voting in Michigan is over. For now, at least.

The U.S. Supreme Court torpedoed Republican efforts on Friday to deep-six a Democratic advantage in the Michigan election process.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Lately, there have been a lot of allegations of funny business within American politics. 

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has repeatedly said that the elections could be rigged. And there have been a lot of concerns that the Russians hacked the Democratic Party's emails. 

The next logical question for many people is, if both those things are true, what's to keep the election results from being hacked?

So is this now summer, or fall?

I know that by the calendar, we officially have two more weeks of summer. But the kids are back in school, the days are starting to get noticeably shorter, and Labor Day marks the traditional dividing line between the seasons.

Psychologically, anyway.

Many of today’s news items still seem like summer stories, with headlines like “naked man charged in homicide,” and “legal deal in the works for killers of pet guinea pig.”

Our national obsession with all Trump, all the time has blocked out most other political news, but there is one item that to me illustrates everything wrong with term limits.

Rick Pluta / MPRN

Former President Bill Clinton was a crowd-stopper today as he marched in Detroit’s Labor Day Parade on behalf of his wife’s presidential campaign.

The parade was often delayed as Clinton was stopped for selfies. He showed off a Detroit-made Shinola watch he was sporting on his wrist.

The visit comes two days after Republican nominee Donald Trump stopped by an African-American church in Detroit. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Republican-led Michigan Legislature returns for voting this week after a three-month summer break, with plans for an abbreviated calendar before the crucial November election determines which party controls the House.

  Both chambers will have three weeks in session before the election, or nine days.

  There could be a lot on the docket, but lawmakers may leave until the post-election "lame duck" period final resolution of high-priority items such as energy and criminal justice legislation.

DonaldJTrump.com

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump tried to woo African-American voters in a visit today to a Detroit church.

Trump came under intense criticism earlier in the campaign after he said African-Americans have nothing to lose by supporting him. There was no evidence of the fiery and often-intemperate candidate in his remarks to the Greater Faith Ministries International congregation. 

Trump said he was mostly there to listen, and that he wants to use his business experience to help restore cities like Detroit.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

While Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump may have taken up most of Detroit’s attention on Saturday, another candidate was trying to shore up votes for Election Day.

Green Party candidate Dr. Jill Stein held a rally in the Eastern Marketplace with her running mate Ajamu Baraka. This was their first joint appearance since the Green Party convention in August.

kids getting on a school bus
woodleywonderworks / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Summer's almost over, and kids all over Michigan are getting ready for the new school year. This Week In Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth look at the School Reform Office's annual list ranking the state's lowest performing schools. They also talk about the latest in the straight-ticket voting saga and whether third party candidates will affect election outcomes in Michigan.


John Auchter / Michigan Radio

Telling the wife of your boss at a dinner party that she is a racist is not a career enhancing move. Turns out, people don't like to be called racist — even if they are.

Let me explain.

Long Haul Films

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is scheduled to be in the congregation at Great Faith Ministries in Detroit on Saturday. There, he will reportedly not be speaking, but afterward, he will sit down to record a TV interview with the church's leader, Bishop Wayne T. Jackson.

The interview will air on Jackson's Impact Television Network. 

Someone who will most certainly not be tuning in to watch the interview is writer and Detroiter Aaron Foley. He wrote an article about Trump's visit for BLACDetroit.com.

Many motorists cars honked their approval (some expressed their displeasure) at Trump supporters in Saginaw.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Donald Trump campaign staged rallies today in cities across Michigan.

Dozens of Trump supporters took over two corners of one of Saginaw’s busiest intersections.

Local campaign organizer Debra Mantey says this is the way for the Republican nominee to win in Michigan.

“The way we’re going to turn Michigan ‘red’ is by face-to-face, with Michigander to another Michigander,” says Mantey.

Mantey downplays polls showing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leading in Michigan. She says recent polls showing Trump gaining ground.  

Presidential campaign merchandise.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A conservative group is running ads this week in Michigan and three other states asking Republican Donald Trump to withdraw from the presidential race.

The ad features Donald Trump saying he would get out of the race if his poll numbers were bad.  The quotes date back to when Trump was riding high during the Republican primaries.

Flickr user Jim Fruchterman/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

From the time Hilary Clinton first ran for President in 2008, former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm has been one of her most vocal and visible supporters.

She was recently named part of Hillary Clinton’s transition team.

Michigan Radio’s Rick Pluta spoke with Granholm to learn what her responsibilities would be in the Hillary Clinton administration, if Clinton is indeed elected.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Democrats will hold their state party convention in Lansing on Saturday.

This weekend’s convention may end up reflecting former presidential candidate’s Bernie Sanders' policies as much as party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

I heard over the weekend from a retired night city editor from an Ohio newspaper who sent me an article from the New York Post about media bias and the presidential election.

He, and the authors of the article, believe the mainstream media is outrageously in favor of Hillary Clinton. Not that the old editor was especially a Donald Trump supporter.

“There’s never been an election with two less-qualified candidates,” he said, but added, “but that still doesn’t give journalists the right to choose sides so blatantly.”

There is a saying in politics that three-quarters of what you do in a campaign doesn’t matter -- you just don’t know which three quarters until after the campaign is over.

That’s because there are so many variables that can make a difference once the voting starts, so candidates, campaigns, and political parties do all they can to gain every marginal advantage.

Voting sign.
flickr user justgrimes / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

If you find yourself dissatisfied with choices offered by the two mainstream political parties, you’ve got a new choice.

The Working Class Party got itself onto the Michigan ballot after more than 50,000 people signed petitions. That’s more than the 31,566 signatures required by election law.

Mary Anne Hering of the Working Class Party joined Stateside to talk about the party’s platform, and introduce the candidates we’ll see on the ballot this November.

Donald Trump is bringing his chaotic presidential campaign to Michigan today, for the second time in two weeks. He is going to speak to a rally at a sports arena in Dimondale, a little outside Lansing, about five this afternoon.

And this morning, I realized something, which was that I don’t much care.

I have had more than enough of this endless campaign.


A person marking a ballot
Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A federal appeals court has declined to stay a lower court ruling that declared Michigan's ban on straight-ticket voting unconstitutional.

Barring a successful emergency appeal by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette, the decision means straight-ticket voting will remain available to Michigan voters in November's general election. 

I’ve been covering politics for a long time, and inevitably, in every election year, amid the high drama and low insults, something happens that is just plain silly.

This year, as you may have noticed, has not been a typical presidential election in any way, shape or form. But what you might call the "Trumpville Follies" is not the only contender for what you might call the "Eugene Ionesco Prize for Best Real Example of the Theater of the Absurd."

Diego Cambiaso / Flickr

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump are dominating the presidential campaign, but in many states, other names also will be on the November ballot.

Former GOP congressional aide Evan McMullin announced his candidacy last week. He joins third party and independent candidates Gary Johnson of the Libertarian Party and Jill Stein with the Green Party as long-shot candidates.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm is part of the team planning Hillary Clinton’s move into the White House if she wins the presidency in November.

The Clinton campaign announced its White House transition team this morning.

Clinton tapped former U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to lead her White House transition team. Salazar will chair a team that includes Granholm, former National Security Adviser Tom Donilon, and longtime Clinton allies Neera Tanden and Maggie Williams.

How much of a role will the state of Michigan’s economy play in deciding your vote in November? Last week, the presidential candidates acted as if it might be a big deal as they both made stops in Michigan to deliver speeches on jobs and the economy. 

Michigan, and Detroit, in particular, remain economically emblematic. But there are two stories to tell and the candidates each packed a different one for the trip. 

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were in Michigan this week to deliver big economic speeches. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about each candidate's fiscal vision, and whether it will resonate with voters. Lessenberry and Kruth also discuss the latest move in a battle over straight-ticket voting in the state.


According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Warren this week to lay out her economic vision for the country. The speech was also intended to counter the speech given by her Republican rival, Donald Trump, at the Detroit Economic Club. 

Michigan State University economics professor Charley Ballard joins Stateside to break down the speech.

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