Environment & Science

sun rays shining through clouds
Piccolo Namek / Creative Commons

Fall officially began on the 22nd. So far we've been treated with the Harvest Moon and warm weather. My kids even broke out the inflatable pool on Wednesday. They splashed around for 5 minutes before they gave up and asked for towels.

Wild boar
Photo by Richard Bartz / Creative Commons

Peter Payette from Interlochen Public Radio filed a report on wild pigs with the Environment Report this week.

Pigs and boars can escape from farms and game ranches and cause problems in an ecosystem. The problem is especially bad in southern states.

Check out this video about the problem in Texas:

Officials at Enbridge Energy are testifying before a House panel this afternoon in DC.  They're being questioned about their pipeline that broke in July near Marshall, MI and leaked more than 800,000 gallons of oil.

REUTERS/Illinois Department of Natural Resources/Handout

Governor Granholm is part of a delegation from the Great Lakes region that is meeting today with officials from the Obama administration. They're meeting in D.C. to discuss how to keep the invasive Asian Carp out of the Great Lakes.

The meeting also includes Governor Ted Strickland of Ohio and John Goss, the White House's newly appointed "Asian Carp Czar."

Officials from the Army Corps of Engineers and other federal agencies will also attend.

The White House has appointed a new "Asian Carp Czar."  Former Indiana environmental chief John Goss was tapped to coordinate the federal response to the Asian Carp.  Governor Granholm says she intends to get in touch with Goss soon.  The Chicago Breaking News Center explains the problems the fish cause:

Aerial photo of Talmadge Creek after Enbridge oil spill
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

It’s been more than a month since an estimated 800,000 gallons of crude oil spilled into the Kalamazoo River. Enbridge Energy Partners, the company responsible for the pipeline leak, says it has cleaned up about 700,000 gallons of that oil.

But there’s still a lot of work to be done. The EPA is just now starting to find out how much oil is at the bottom of the river.

Erika Celeste / Environment Report

This documentary is an in-depth look at the future of coal in this country.

The Environment Report explores the role that coal plays in our lives and in the lives of those who depend on coal mining for a living.

Can coal truly be a viable option in the new green economy?

Listen to the Documentary:

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Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

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