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steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A controversial company will provide some Flint residents with bottled water for the next several months.

Nestle has been criticized for its deal to pump more water from rural Michigan for its bottled water business.

The company has agreed to distribute thousands of those bottles for free to Flint residents.

Stateside 5.8.2018

May 8, 2018

Today on Stateside, we play a new mixtape from West Michigan featuring The Go Rounds, Lady Ace Boogie, The Founding, and The Hacky Turtles. Also today, we discuss mandatory reporting and whether it hurts survivors of campus sexual assault.

needle
Partha Sahana / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

It began in Switzerland in 1986 as a way to combat overdose deaths and diseases linked to opioid drugs: safe injection sites, also known as supervised injection sites.

It’s a place where users can inject drugs in a clean place, with clean needles, and under medical supervision.

PUBLIC DOMAIN

More children in Michigan are dying because of abuse or neglect compared to a decade ago. Back then, the state settled a federal lawsuit, promising to improve its child welfare system. The state has spent millions of dollars on that effort.

Welcome to MorningSide 48224, a community podcast. We’re loaning out audio equipment so MorningSide residents can record themselves and conduct interviews to tell their own stories through sound.

Listen to the stories below:

Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It wasn't all that long ago when proud parents might carry a small photo album they would happily whip out to show photos of their kids.

Today, parents have various options for sharing photos of their kids on social media. But what do kids think about all that sharing?

Michigan leaders want to make crumbling Detroit fort into national park

May 3, 2018
Historic Fort Wayne
Wikimedia Commons

A movement is afoot to make the historically rich but deteriorating Historic Fort Wayne in Southwest Detroit into a national park, Bridge Magazine has learned.

As construction is set to begin this fall on the $4.5 billion Gordie Howe International Bridge linking Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, community and state leaders increasingly are focusing on the future of the fort grounds that lie directly to the east.

Andrew Jameson / Wikimedia Commons

Siwatu-Salama Ra is a young Detroit activist who was sentenced to two years in prison for brandishing a licensed and unloaded firearm in what she claims was an act of self-defense. Her conviction has raised questions about the nature of black gun ownership in the United States.

Stateside 5.1.2018

May 1, 2018

Today on Stateside, University of Michigan graduates discuss why so many of their classmates don't stay in Michigan. And, armed with history, black gun owners weigh in on exercising their Second Amendment rights.

Take a tour of MorningSide 48224 with Detroit Public TV

May 1, 2018
Corner of Mack and Alter
Detroit Public TV

Michigan Radio's Imani Mixon was on Detroit Public TV last weekend to discuss MorningSide 48224, the new podcast project by Michigan Radio and the Detroit Journalism Cooperative.

Watch below to get a tour of the neighborhood, and to learn more about the podcast:

Emma Winowiecki/ Michigan Radio

A woman who says Michigan State University ignored her sexual assault complaints is considering a run for the school’s board of trustees.

Amanda Thomashow says she's strongly considering a run for the position. She’s a survivor of Larry Nassar. He’s the former MSU doctor who sexually assaulted his patients for years. Thomashow reported Nassar to school officials, but her complaint was swept under the rug.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Four years ago this day, the world turned upside down for Flint.

It happened as then-Mayor Dayne Walling and other officials officially switched the city's drinking water over to the Flint River -- and then toasted each other with glasses of that water.

That untreated water caused water pipes to corrode -- leaching lead into the water going into Flint homes and businesses. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high lead levels. And government officials, especially at the state level, dismissed the pleas of people who knew something was wrong with the water.

Stateside 4.23.2018

Apr 23, 2018

Today on Stateside, we talk to Lee Anne Walters, the Flint water activist who just won the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for grassroots environmental activism. And, we learn what microbiomes can tell us about death from an MSU study exploring the life of a corpse.

A picture of Lee Anne Walters with her son Garrett outside of her home in Flint in 2015
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

 


 

The Goldman Environmental Prize is the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for grassroots environmental activism.

Yoga mats set out and ready for the class to begin
Sarah Leeson / Michigan Radio

After what is often years of waiting and paperwork, some refugees from desperate situations around the world are fortunate enough to be accepted into the U.S. But then what? If you’ve been in a war-torn area or are a victim of torture, you’re glad to be safe.

But you’re in a strange country. You might not speak English. You might be confused by government bureaucracy or an unfamiliar medical system. Then there’s a chance you’re suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or other mental health issues. 

Kids at a public school in Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Fewer children in Michigan lived in poverty in 2016, but the numbers are still grim.

The latest Kids Count Data Book says between 2010 and 2016, the state's child poverty rate dropped from 23 percent to 21 percent. However, that still means nearly half a million children lived below the poverty line in 2016.

Rates also remain particularly high for children of color. The report says in 2016, 42 percent of African American children and 30 percent of Latino children lived in poverty.

Stateside 4.18.2018

Apr 18, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn how a washing machine reduced absenteeism at a Detroit school. And, we discuss a Detroit Free Press report that reveals the first signs of cracks between the MSU Board of Trustees and interim President John Engler.

The city of Kalamazoo
Mxobe

The city of Kalamazoo has made headlines with its unique Kalamazoo Promise: anonymous donors pledging to pay up to 100 percent of college tuition for the kids who graduate from the city's public schools.

Here comes another effort: Shared Prosperity Kalamazoo. The vision? Turn Kalamazoo into a community where no adult or child is left behind because of poverty or inequality of opportunity.

Prison fence barbed wire
Kevin Rosseel / morguefile

Inmates at a mid-Michigan prison are on lockdown after gang related fighting.

Multiple fights broke out over the course of several days. They started Thursday, and occurred multiple times on Sunday during meals and finally on the prison yard on Monday. The facility has been on lockdown since Monday at lunchtime. Lockdown means inmates don’t have any privileges and are confined to their cells.

Downtown Grand Rapids
Grguy2011 / Public Domain

On May 3, we'll be producing Stateside in front of a live audience at Celebration Cinema North in Grand Rapids, and we want your help producing the show.

What stories from Grand Rapids do you think should be shared with the rest of the state? What issues do you think need coverage? Are there unsung heroes or people from Grand Rapids you want us to talk to?

Courtesy of Fritz Allhoff

It’s quite the journey from Kalamazoo to Alaska – to tiny towns like Nulato, with a population of 259.

But a team from Western Michigan University has made that journey each year since 2014. They head to isolated small towns like Nulato to help people there with their taxes.

Fatou-Seydi Sarr
Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

Fatou-Seydi Sarr was born in Senegal, but she now calls Detroit her home.

She brings her experiences as a black African Muslim immigrant woman to her work in social justice and human rights in metro Detroit.

Flint residents stand on the Capitol steps protesting the Snyder administration decision to stop free bottled water delivery to the city.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

People from Flint interrupted a state legislative session Wednesday to demand clean drinking water.

They’re upset with the recent decision by Governor Rick Snyder’s administration to stop distributing free bottled water in the city. During House session, people started to chant, “Do your job, open the PODs” – that’s Point of Delivery for bottled water distribution. The group then walked down the stairs and out of the Capitol while chanting. One person was temporarily detained. He says he isn’t facing any charges.

Wikipedia Commons

It's been a long, tough, cold winter in Michigan. But it's turned out especially tough for residents of Neebish Island in the U.P.  

The island is entering week two of being cut off from the mainland, after ice pieces from Lake Superior jammed the passage across St. Mary's River. 

Jamie Pringle is captain of the island's ferry. He says he is using an airboat to get mail and supplies to people. And the Coast Guard has a helicopter ready for emergencies.

Pringle says islanders are taking the situation in stride. 

Stateside 4.9.2018

Apr 9, 2018

As the state ends free bottled water, today on Stateside, Rep. Kildee says people of Flint deserve "a little more respect." Also today, we visit a Detroit church that's been providing sanctuary for an Albanian immigrant and his family for about three months.

Cynthia Canty / Michigan Radio

 


The concept of seeking sanctuary in a church is an ancient one. 

 

As the United States toughens its immigration stance though, people facing deportation are turning to churches for sanctuary. 

This year, Michigan Radio is trying something new.

Instead of sending a reporter in to tell stories about MorningSide, we’re inviting the MorningSide community to tell their own stories.

From family histories to local happenings, we want to highlight narratives that feel true and honest to the people who experience the neighborhood every day.

Stateside 4.4.2018

Apr 4, 2018

Today on Stateside, a geologist explains why Michigan's got such big underground reserves of potash. And, there's an important part of the national conversation about violence against women that hasn't gotten as much attention as it deserves. We discuss the role of men and boys in preventing domestic violence.

Remi Walle / Unsplash

There’s an important part of the national conversation about violence against women that hasn’t received as much attention as it deserves: the role of men and boys in preventing domestic violence.

Nicole Beverly
Stateside Staff / Michigan Radio

The torrent of death threats made an impression on the Washtenaw County jury because on Tuesday, that jury convicted Kevin Beverly of felonies for extorting and intimidating his ex-wife, Nicole.

Nicole Beverly first spoke with Stateside last summer. On Stateside, we heard her story of years of terrifying abuse, stalking, and threats from her ex, Kevin – including threats made while he was in prison, serving a five year sentence on a 2012 conviction for stalking Nicole.

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