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Families & Community

Stateside 6.12.2017

Jun 12, 2017

Today, we hear a Chaldean community leader explain why deporting Iraqi Christians could be a "death sentence." And a PR expert tells us why MSU needs a concrete action plan to address sexual assault scandals and improve the school's image.

Stateside 6.9.2017

Jun 9, 2017

Today, we hear from an imam who says anti-Islam protests in Michigan are led by people who don't understand Islam. And, in our latest edition of Artisans of Michigan, we visit an angler hooked on tying flies. 

ISLAMIC CENTER OF AMERICA

Anti-Islam protestors are gathering in Lansing tomorrow for the March Against Sharia.

It’s one of a couple dozen such protests across the nation. There has not been a lot of media coverage about it, and the only coverage we've seen on the Michigan march has been in the MetroTimes.

These anti-Islam protestors point to the atrocities of ISIS and to the Dearborn cleric Ahmad Musa Jibril, whose YouTube videos might have inspired one of the men involved in last week's London terror attack, as proof that Islam is a violent religion. 

But Imam Sohail Chaudhry of the Islamic Society of Greater Lansing said protestors aren’t seeing the full picture.

child in doorway
Caro / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

An advocacy group for kids says a court-ordered report shows Michigan has a long way to go before it can guarantee the safety and welfare of children in foster care.

 

The monitors report says problems include the state not doing background checks on many relatives who take in foster kids, and not investigating credible allegations of abuse or neglect.

 

S P Photography / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

Day care for children is a fact of life for many Michigan families. But with more and more people looking after aging parents, there's also a need for adult day care.

flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state House passed controversial gun legislation today to get rid of the permit necessary to carry a concealed weapon.

Advocates say you already don’t need a permit to open carry.

 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

  A state House committee has adopted bills that would require local officials to help enforce federal immigration laws.

 

Opponents filled the hearing room and spilled into an overflow room. Some cheered or applauded testimony opposing the bills. No one testified in favor of or showed up to support

Stateside 6.7.2017

Jun 7, 2017

Today, Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon gives his take on the Michigan State University scandals. He says MSU football's success may have weakened the team's "filter on character." Next, we peek back in history to when Michigan traded turkeys to Canada to replenish the Upper Peninsula's moose population. And, parents explain why they're "afraid to die" because of fear that the mental health care system won't take care of their children.

Kevin Rosseel / morguefile

The state is hammering out its budget. And lawmakers are having a sharp disagreement with the governor’s office over one of Michigan’s biggest price tags – the corrections budget. Both sides agree rehabilitation and lowering recidivism is the way to go. But they can’t agree on how much money to spend this year.

At stake are programs – like the Vocational Village in Ionia – that have helped lower the state’s incarceration rate.

Stateside 6.6.2017

Jun 6, 2017

Today, we learn why the EPA's flip-flop leaves children at risk from chlorpyrifos, a widely used pesticide sold by Dow Chemical. And, a father who lost his son to suicide says mental health education is crucial for schools.

child's drawing on chalkboard
iRon leSs / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

State lawmakers say they will look into reports the Michigan agency that handles child abuse and neglect cases fudged its numbers to make it appear it was complying with a court order.

 

Stateside 6.5.2017

Jun 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn child welfare records may have been faked in at least seven counties. And, a food scientist explains why consumers "don't have anything to fear" when it comes to pesticide residue.

A few of the items you can check out at the Capital Area District Library's "Library of Things"
Screenshot from CADL.org

The Next Idea

We think of borrowing from a library and what comes to mind? Books. DVDs. CDs.

Now, through the Capital Area District Libraries in Lansing, you can check out a badminton set, a GoPro camera,  a thermal leak detector or even a sewing machine. Those are just some of the items that they have available in the CADL's Library of Things.

silhouette of family
Tumisu / Pixabay

When parents get divorced or split up, the biggest question is usually: Who gets the kids?

Most child custody cases are settled outside the courtroom. But when parents can’t agree, it’s up to a family court judge to decide.

A bill introduced Wednesday in the State House would issue new guidelines about how judges make those decisions.

Poet and educator Denise Miller
Courtesy of Society for History and Racial Equity (SHARE)

Hiding people in barns, or stowing people in secret rooms while keeping the watchful eyes of law enforcement and bounty hunters away from their clandestine activities. That's our image of Michiganders who helped thousands of escaping slaves through the Underground Railroad.

But there are many more dimensions to the Underground Railroad in Michigan.

Historian Michelle S. Johnson has made it her mission to help us more fully understand Michigan's role in the Underground Railroad.

BRIDGE MAGAZINE: One envelope holds her fate. Is she getting deported?

May 30, 2017
Maria Juarez hugs mother-in-law.
Bridge Magazine

Maria Garcia Juarez wandered around the international arrivals area at Detroit Metropolitan Airport on Friday, frantically looking for a government official who held a sheet of paper with her fate written on it.

Stateside 5.25.2017

May 25, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how one refugee built a new life in Grand Rapids after fleeing terrorism in Somalia. Also on the show today, we learn how Prop A keeps Michigan towns and cities strapped for cash, even as home values return to normal.

American flag fluttering against a blue sky
Corey Seeman/Flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Ali Warsame's journey to become a permanent, legal resident of Michigan was long and difficult.

He fled the war in his homeland of Somalia, which is one of the six majority-Muslim countries included in President Trump's revised travel ban. Before eventually reaching Grand Rapids, he passed through Ethiopia, Russia, Ukraine and Europe.

He was a teenager when he left Somalia. He told Stateside that one of the reasons he had to leave was that he felt pressure from terrorist groups, which were recruiting young people to join them.

An elderly woman
Chris Goldberg / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some Democrats at the state Capitol say it’s time to take a new look at services for the elderly in Michigan, especially nursing home care. They say the need will become more critical as more Michigan residents get older and require assisted living.

State Representative John Hoadley, D-Kalamazoo, says a study on the issue is a good first step.

Stateside 5.23.2017

May 23, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how one West Michigan school district is responding to student deaths by suicide. And, we learn why the future is uncertain for most business districts outside of downtown Detroit

Bev Sykes / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Throughout the presidential campaign, and certainly through the first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency, Americans have been wrestling with anger, disappointment and frustration with friends and family who supported "the other" candidate.

Friendships have soured. Family get-togethers are often strained and sometimes openly hostile when political disagreements erupt.

It’s a growing divide that needs to be bridged. But how?

A man and woman on a porch at a house in Detroit
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

A group of housing activists hopes to organize land contract buyers in Detroit and other cities.

Stateside 5.18.2017

May 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear one couple's story of overcoming infertility. We also learn why Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon has directed his staff not to honor ICE detainer requests unless very specific conditions are met. 

KIT JOHNSON / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

President Trump appears to be keeping his campaign promise to go after unauthorized immigrants. 

 Federal immigration agents are arresting more than 400 immigrants a day. That’s a sizeable jump from levels a year ago.

Fair Winds Press, 2017

One of the greatest challenges a couple can face is infertility.

That struggle of trying to conceive can be so overwhelming that you feel you’re the only one who’s going through it.

That’s why a Michigan couple has come out with a book that shares ten different couples’ experiences with infertility, including their own.

BRIDGE MAGAZINE: How to cash in on a crappy home. Step one: Find a sucker to sign a land contract.

May 18, 2017
Bridge photo by Joel Kurth

Denise Pope put a down payment on hope as much as a house.

Sure, the home wasn’t much: An 800-square-foot wood bungalow, barely big enough to contain her four children and husband. There were holes in the walls, probably from thieves getting to copper pipes. Like most empty Detroit homes, it lacked a furnace and water heater.

But it was in a good neighborhood, Rosedale Park, near a big playground. And the house came with a promise: Put $3,500 down, pay $500 per month plus $82 in taxes, and it would be hers in a little over two years.  

Stateside 5.17.2017

May 18, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how the downward spiral of public school funding in Battle Creek could end with a $51 million grant. And, a Michigan woman discusses grief, loss and finding common ground after an abortion at 21 weeks.

Photograph of a sunset over Torch Lake, Michigan
brentdaily / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Rachel Redmond had wanted to be a mother for a long time, ever since she was a little girl.

When she and her husband decided to have a child, Redmond became pregnant quickly.

“Everything was going according to plan, all of my early ultrasounds were perfect,” she said. 

Durfee Elementary-Middle School in Northwest Detroit
Jenna Belevender

 

Durfee Elementary-Middle School on Detroit’s northwest side is a spectacular neo-gothic building flush with architectural detail. As you walk through the main entrance, you’re greeted by highly decorative arches, rich paneling, and Pewabic-tiled floors.

 

Built in the early 1900s, generations of Detroiters have attended Durfee.  

 

Handguns.
user Ben Re / Flickr

Gun rights are up for debate in the state Legislature, again.

A set of bills to get rid of the requirement to carry a permit in order to carry a concealed pistol was up in front of a House committee Tuesday.

Advocates say the legislation is long overdue and the legislation wouldn’t take away the regulations on who can carry a firearm.

But opponents say it erodes gun safety.

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