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Ford Motor Company

Ford suspends all F-150 production after fire at supplier

May 10, 2018
Ford has halted all production of its best-selling vehicle, the F-150 truck.
Ford Motor Company

Due to a component shortage after a fire at one of its suppliers, Ford Motor Company announced Wednesday it is suspending all production of its best-selling F-150 trucks.

The fire at Meridian Magnesium Products of America in Eaton Rapids, Mich. occurred May 2, injuring two people, forcing nearly 150 people to evacuate the building, and destroying portions of the roof, according to The Lansing State Journal. In a news release yesterday, Meridian Magnesium General Manager George Asher said the company is “planning to recall some employees for critical operations as soon as possible.”

Courtesy of Public Citizen

A coalition of environmental and consumer advocates says Ford Motor Company and other automakers are lobbying the Trump administration to roll back fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards known as clean car standards, and they should stop.

The coalition includes Public Citizen, Sierra Club, and Greenpeace USA.

The Ford Taurus at an auto show
Dave Pinter / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Ford this week announced plans to stop making almost its entire line-up of cars by 2022. That means we can say farewell to the Fiesta, the Taurus, the Focus, the Fusion, and the C-Max hybrid. Only Ford's iconic Mustang and a small crossover will remain in production in the North American market. 

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss Ford's decision to focus on its better-selling lines of trucks and SUVs, and whether GM might follow suit.

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

A few years after the bankruptcies of General Motors and Chrysler, I found myself on the long porch of Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel chatting with Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne.

He was talking about the Chapter 11 process to help failing companies and how it helped Chrysler and GM survive – thanks to Obama's auto task force and American taxpayers.

It also forced the people running those companies – and those who would follow – to make hard decisions. I was reminded of that this week. In less than 24 hours, those who care got three separate looks at the financial health of Detroit’s three automakers and things looked different.

The 2015 Ford Mustang.
Ford Motor Company

In 1908, Henry Ford sent the first Model T rolling off the assembly line at his Piquette Avenue plant in Detroit.

A hundred and ten years later, the Ford Motor Company is no longer betting on cars for its future.

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

So Bill Ford wants the Blue Oval to buy the decrepit Michigan Central Depot. You know that toothless edifice, empty and decaying since 1988, towering over Detroit’s Corktown. It’s an 18-story high reminder of the industrial and financial decline that has been synonymous with this town.         

Until very recently.

GORDON / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The oldest surviving neighborhood in Detroit is Corktown. Irish immigrants started settling there in the 1830s, and many of them were from County Cork.

You could make a good case that the most famous symbol of Detroit's decline and urban decay is right there in the heart of Corktown: the Michigan Central Station.

The once-glorious train station closed 30 years ago and has since been ravaged by scrappers and weather. Now we hear that Ford is in talks to buy Michigan Central and return to the city.

Michigan Central Station in Detroit
Jason Mrachina / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 


 

As Ford talks of buying Michigan Central Station, residents in the surrounding neighborhood might be the ones seeing the most impact.

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

The Blue Oval has seen the future, and it looks a whole lot like its past.

Ford Motor claims a rich heritage building the nation’s best-selling pickup and the best-selling three-row SUV. Its Mustang is an American icon. And its performance pedigree is enjoying a renaissance under product planners who understand emotion still matters in the business.

Ford Media Center

What kind of conveniences do you want in your future car? We're talking more than Bluetooth connection, or climate control, or even an autonomous car. How about a water dispenser that you don’t have to fill?

How would that work?

We’re glad you asked, because one of the inventors of a prototype, patent pending, of the On-the-Go H2O joined Stateside today. His name is Doug Martin and he’s a Powertrain Controls Engineer for Ford.

Lloyd Hartnett assembly line in 1957.
flickr user John Lloyd / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

If you grew up in Michigan, you've probably got a pretty fair idea how the auto business works, including the basic fact that the vehicles rolling off assembly lines are going to be driven by people.

Daniel HowesDetroit News business columnist, joined Stateside to talk about the auto industry's innovative practices and what lies ahead. 

Updated 10:30 a.m. ET

Ford Motor Co.'s North American President Raj Nair has been forced out over allegations of "inappropriate behavior." The company didn't offer many details.

In a statement, Ford said that Nair, 53, is leaving the company effective immediately.

Eric Neitzel / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

 

Time's running out on the American car.

That's the conclusion drawn by Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes after the automakers released their year-end sales results, and after some news coming out of the Ford Glass House.

2018 Lincoln Navigator
David Pinter / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Word came from the LA Auto Show this week: Ford's luxury brand Lincoln is doing a reboot.

They're ditching the confusing letters-only name of MKX, and giving their midsize SUV a real name: Nautilus.

UAW-GM Center for Human Resources
Bill VanderMolen/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Four months ago, corruption charges were filed against a former Fiat Chrysler labor executive, and the wife of the late UAW vice president General Holiefield. They're accused of funneling millions intended for training UAW workers into their own pockets.

Today, the Detroit News reported that federal agents have broadened this corruption investigation to include a member of the General Motors board, plus the head of the UAW's GM department. The feds are also looking into the UAW training centers funded by GM and Ford.

screen grab Ford Motor Company

For the second time in 20 years, Ford Motor Company has settled an investigation with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission over complaints of sexual and racial harassment at its Chicago Stamping and Chicago Assembly plants.

The EEOC says Ford also retaliated against workers who reported the harassment.

Ford has agreed to pay up to $10.1 million to victims, as well as institute training for workers.

The Ford Focus
Ford Motor Company

In the rhetorical battle between President Donald Trump and Ford Motor’s investors, the president is losing.

The Blue Oval is moving American production of the Focus to China – presumably because shipping it to Mexico from Michigan wasn’t sufficiently controversial.

For the first time, a Detroit automaker will, quote, “globally source” an established model and use Chinese labor to assemble it for sale to American consumers. Let the tweet storm commence – or not, as it turns out.

red ford focus
Asya Apelsin / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

Ford has announced for the third time where the next generation of the Ford Focus car is going to be assembled: China.

Daniel Howes tells Stateside what this means for the city of Wayne, where the car model is currently being assembled. He also talks about potential future moves for Ford.

The Ford Focus
Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company will export vehicles from China to the U.S. for the first time starting in 2019.

The company announced Tuesday the plan to export the next-generation Focus from China rather than Mexico, as previously planned. Production of the Focus will phase out of Wayne, Michigan in mid-2018.

Joe Hinrichs, president of Ford's global operations, says the move will save the auto maker $1 billion, including $500 million from canceling a new plant in Mexico that was intended to build the Focus.

satellite map of Michigan, the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

The Trump Administration released its proposed federal budget. The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would get zero dollars if the plan is approved as is. Over the past seven years, it received $2.2 billion in funding to preserve the Great Lakes.

Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss how that cut could affect Michigan residents.

Ford Motor Company's headquarters in Dearborn.
Ford Motor Company

He has headed up the world's biggest office furniture company and hired Jim Harbaugh as head football coach at the University of Michigan.

Now, Jim Hackett is replacing outgoing CEO Mark Fields as the new head of Ford Motor Company.

Ford Motor Company's headquarters in Dearborn.
Ford Motor Company

Ford has reportedly come up with an answer to its lackluster stock performance: shed jobs.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Ford is getting ready to cut about 10% of its workforce to help boost its stock price.

Reuters further reported that those jobs will come from salaried workers in North America and Asia, not hourly workers.

Ford Motor Co. headquarters
Ford Motor Company

The Ford Motor Company is planning to cut its global workforce by about 10%.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the cuts aim to boost the company's profits and stock price. The report states that the company's stock has fallen in the three years since Mark Fields become CEO.

Auto sales fell in March and April, with Ford falling 7.2% in year-over-year sales.

General Motors headquarters in Detroit.
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio file photo

Recent reports show that auto sales have slipped more than expected. That’s the fourth month in a row of declining sales.

And Wall Street responded. Share prices of the big three took a hit.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Auto companies posted their second consecutive monthly sales decline in April.

Some analysts believe this is a sign the automakers’ seven-year winning streak is coming to an end.

Since 2010, Ford, General Motors and other automakers have seen their monthly sales grow and grow. Automakers sold a record 17.55 million vehicles in 2016.  

However, the car companies have been relying more and more on discounts and deals to bring buyers in.   But even that hasn’t been enough lately.

Case in point: April, which was not a good month for the auto companies.

The Tesla Model S, first introduced in June 2012
Tesla Motors

Here’s the latest Detroit indignity: Tiny Tesla, the electric automaker, is felling giants.

The Silicon Valley startup created in 2003 is worth more in market value than the American industrial icon founded exactly 100 years earlier by Henry Ford, the premier innovator of his time.

Tesla’s not far behind General Motors, either. The promise of game-changing innovation, the hope that someone new can crack the emissions-free code is causing tons of smart money to flow into Chairman Elon Musk’s Tesla.

Nearly $49 billion-worth, to be precise.

A Tesla electronic car at a charging station
Austin Kirk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's a tiny company packing a big punch with investors.

Electric car maker Tesla now has a higher market value than Ford. It's just behind General Motors at the top of the list. 

Ford Motor Co. headquarters
Ford Motor Company

U.S. automakers sold 1.56 million new cars and trucks in March. That's down 1.6% from this time last year.

Ford Motor Co. headquarters
Ford Motor Company

Forget the “Lost Decade.”

Profitable automakers racing for the new-new thing of mobility are starting to create the "Next Decade." On one track are the likes of General Motors and Ford Motor, each booking record profits on the strength of trucks and SUVs. On the other track is a whole new world with the power to change the perception – and reality – of Michigan as we know it.

Steve Shotwell / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Daniel Howes' column today in the Detroit News looks at some decisions by Ford Motor Company, and what they say about the future of the auto industry and Michigan.

Howes wrote about Ford’s investments in three plants, including an engine plant, and one retooling to make the returning Ford Ranger and Bronco. But he says it's what’s happening with that third investment that says a lot about what Ford is doing. 

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