WUOMFM

gun control

A gun lying on a table with bullets around it.
Daniel Weber / Flickr

State lawmakers might soon consider bills that would let courts temporarily take guns away from gun owners they considered to be dangerous to other people or themselves.

SCREENGRAB - NEWS4JAX / WWW.NEWS4JAX.COM

After 17 students were killed in a Florida school last week, some high school students in Kalamazoo decided they needed to do something.

Under the banner of “Students Fighting Guns Since Adults Won’t,” eight students drafted a petition and put it up on Change.org, a popular petition website.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

It’s been five days since the Valentine’s Day school shooting in Florida; the 17 dead are being buried, and the story is easing out of the headlines.

This weekend, writing a newspaper column, I started to refer to this as “our nation’s latest school shooting,” and caught myself. Better not say that, I realized.

A vigil was held Thursday night to mourn the 17 victims in the Parkland school shooting. Fourteen victims were students.
Screengrab - News4Jax / www.news4jax.com

Someday, a shooter will walk into a school, probably a suburban school, somewhere in Michigan, and blow teachers and students away, most likely with a weapon no civilian should be allowed to own. When that happens, don’t give me any credit for prophecy.

Mackinac Bridge
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

This week, Enbridge Energy reported the protective coating has worn off of it's Line 5 pipeline in more spots than previously revealed. Line 5 is the oil and gas pipeline that runs under the straits of Mackinac. The new report says there were 8 spots of bare metal and seven of them will be repaired before winter sets in. A state commission has called Enbridge to testify next month.

Michigan Radio's Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about possible solutions.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

I’m not big on ideology. I’ve known communists and Ayn Randers, and both live in closed systems that are substitutes for really having to think.

The communists are pretty much limited to a few websites these days, and I don’t get the sense that middle-class teenage boys still read The Fountainhead as often as they did.

Kevin Reese / Flickr- HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL

This Las Vegas massacre has revived the outcry against the presence of certain guns in this country. These calls for tightening gun laws, or banning the bump stock that converts a rifle into an automatic weapon, are focused on Congress.

But there won't be much of an outcry in Lansing, beyond a few tweets.

That's because the gun control side lost Michigan more than 16 years ago, according to Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michiganders are looking for answers in the wake of the massacre in Las Vegas.

Gunman Stephen Paddock packed at least 10 suitcases with guns and ammo to a suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino. From there he opened fire on people attending a country music concert, killing 59 people and injuring nearly 530.

Law enforcement continues to search for a motive.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

Whatever else you can say about us, this much is clear. No other so-called advanced, or civilized, or industrial nation has anything like the deaths from firearms we do.

Yes, there will be murders committed with guns in Japan this year. Based on recent statistics, there will probably be 12 or 13 of them. Japan has about 127 million people.

Michigan has less than 10 million, so if our culture was anything like Japan’s you might expect we’d have perhaps one murder committed with a firearm this year.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

A group of gun control advocates was at the state Capitol to lobby against a proposal to allow people to carry concealed weapons without a permit.

               

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

A man who was once hospitalized for depression cannot legally buy a gun in Michigan – at least not without a court fight. That’s the decision handed down recently by a federal appeals court.

Michigan resident Clifford Tyler was turned away by a gun dealer after a background check revealed his history of being hospitalized for depression. Tyler is 74, and his hospitalization was more than 30 years ago following a divorce. Tyler says he has not had any mental health issues since.

Demonstrators at Capitol seek stronger gun laws

Sep 7, 2016
Rick Pluta / MPRN

Michigan lawmakers returning for the fall session today were greeted by a "die-in" outside the state Capitol.

The protest was organized by the Michigan Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence.

According to Linda Brundage, executive director of the Coalition, the goal of the "die-in" was to draw attention to the 91 people killed by guns each day in the U.S., and to highlight inaction by state lawmakers on bills to reduce gun violence.

"There is very good legislation languishing in the Judiciary Committee eliminating open carry in our schools and libraries," said Brundage.

Courtesy of UICA, Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University

Few things are as polarizing in American society as the debate between gun control advocates and gun rights activists.

These arguments often play out in national and state legislatures, with many gun control advocates feeling the National Rifle Association has undue influence over politicians.

Michigan Radio’s Vincent Duffy hosted a panel discussion on the role that guns play in politics and elections at our latest Issues & Ale event.

Michigan Democrats call for "common sense gun laws"

Jun 30, 2016
A gun lying on a table with bullets around it.
Daniel Weber / Flickr

Democrats in Michigan's Congressional delegation are pushing for a pair of gun safety laws. 

One bill, dubbed "No Fly, No Buy," would prevent people on the terrorist watch list from buying guns. The other would expand background check policies.

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint, says it's time to do something about gun violence. 

"We have it within our power to take action. Will it prevent all violence? No. Could it have an effect on the next terrible event? Perhaps," Kildee says.

Photo credit: www.terryforohio.com

Issues & Ale: The role of guns in politics
Tue, July 12, 6:30-8:00 PM

Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts
2 Fulton St W.,
Grand Rapids, MI 49503

- Free Admission -

  Few things are as polarizing in American society as the debate between gun control and gun rights activists. These arguments often play out in national and state legislatures, with many gun control advocates feeling the National Rifle Association has undue influence over politicians. Join Michigan Radio’s Vincent Duffy as he hosts this panel discussion on the role that guns play in politics and elections.

Rep. Dan Kildee / Twitter

Earlier today, House Democrats ended their 25-hour sit-in on the house floor.

Led by U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Georgia, revered for his role in the civil rights movement, Democrats demanded votes on gun control issues such as universal background checks and blocking gun sales to anyone on a no-fly list.

The protest drew a range of reactions from their colleagues and constituents.

Rep. Debbie Dingell (right) of Michigan's 12th Congressional District participated last night in a sit-in protesting legislative inaction on gun control. Also pictured: Representatives Catherine Clark and John Lewis and Senator Elizabeth Warren.
Rep. Debbie Dingell / Twitter

Of the hundreds of legislators who spoke as they occupied the House chamber last night in a historic sit-in to protest Congressional inaction on gun control, it may have been the words of Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., that made the biggest impact. 

"I lived in a house with a man who should not have had access to a gun," Dingell said in a passionate address delivered at roughly 12:25 a.m.

Democratic congressional representatives are staging a sit-in on the House floor to push a restriction on suspected terrorists' ability to buy guns.
Rep. Dan Kildee / Twitter

Five Democratic Michigan representatives are participating in a sit-in aimed at closing what they call the 'terror loophole.' They propose closing the loophole with what they call the #NoFlyNoBuy law. It would make it more difficult for those specifically on the FBI's no-fly list to buy guns.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

John Hoadley says he doesn't want people in Michigan trying  what he's seen people do in YouTube videos: mount a remote-controlled gun on a drone, and fly it.

"When we think about the fact that these drones are now potentially flying over our homes or schools where our kids or neighbors are," says the Democratic state representative from Kalamazoo, "it's  appropriate to have a framework that says, while there are very cool pieces of this new technology, it would be inappropriate to have flying guns in the state of Michigan."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan U.S. Senator Gary Peters says now’s the time “to act on guns”.

Peters and his fellow Democrats get their long-sought votes on gun control after the massacre in Orlando, Florida, but election-year politics ensure no changes in the nation's laws.

Democrats are expected to vote tonight to block two Republican amendments, saying they don't do enough. Republicans are expected to block two Democratic amendments, saying they threaten the rights of gun owners.

Senator Gary Peters, a Michigan Democrat, participated in a filibuster on the senate floor Wednesday meant to call attention to legislative inaction on gun control.
Gary Peters / Facebook

Senator Gary Peters, D-Mich., took the Senate floor on Wednesday as part of a Democratic filibuster meant to draw attention to gun control issues in the wake of Sunday's mass shooting in Orlando, in which 49 people at a gay nightclub were killed by a gunman using a legally purchased assault rifle.

Michigan has very minimal requirements for gun sales. But you need to get a permit before buying a pistol, and there are a few people who aren’t allowed a license, mainly those with a possibly dangerous mental illness or a criminal conviction.

State Representative Robert Wittenberg, D-Oak Park, introduced a bill last week that seems pure common sense. He wants to require gun licensing agencies to notify police and prosecutors when someone applies and fails the background check.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

Police could be notified if you try to buy a gun and fail a background check.

That's if a bill introduced in the Michigan State House today passes. The bill, introduced by Rep. Robert Wittenberg, D-Oak Park, would require gun sellers to contact state, local, and federal authorities if a person fails a background check when trying to buy a firearm.

Wittenberg said the goal is to head off illegal purchases of guns.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

This Week in Michigan politics, Jack Lessenberry said the recent shooting in Kalamazoo won't prompt legislation on gun control any time soon, he explained the controversial "gag order" law and gave an update on Flint and Detroit


President Obama yesterday announced a series of executive orders aimed at enforcing existing laws and lowering the death rate. You might think that was common sense policy.


James Craig, Detroit police chief, says terrorist attacks would not occur in Detroit because of armed citizens.
M&R Glasgow / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Detroit police chief James Craig said the casualties following the terrorist attacks in Paris — resulting in more than 100 deaths — would not have occurred had the citizens been armed.

"A lot of Detroiters have (concealed pistol licenses), and the same rules apply to terrorists as they do to some gun-toting thug," Chief James Craig told The Detroit News. "If you're a terrorist, or a carjacker, you want unarmed citizens."

Yesterday, a circuit judge in Washtenaw County struck a blow for common sense and sanity by ruling that Ann Arbor public schools could ban guns in their buildings.

That immediately provoked a furious reaction from those who think guns more important than anything else, including the lives and well-being of children.

The attorney for a group called Michigan Gun Owners fairly sneered, “I think the judge decided to ignore state law.”

He added that they would appeal.

A gun lying on a table with bullets around it.
Daniel Weber / Flickr

Earlier this month, we spoke with gun instructor Rick Ector about the increase in the number of women in Michigan with concealed pistol licenses, or CPLs.

Kristen Moore of the Michigan Chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America wanted to continue the conversation by exploring the role that firearms play in violence against women.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

As the debate over gun rights and regulations sways back and forth in the media and legislatures across the country, Michigan is seeing a surge in women with concealed pistol licenses.

In 2010, some 10,000 women in Michigan had the permits. Today, that number is over 25,000.

Gratiot and Muskegon counties saw increases of more than 400 percent, according to The Detroit News. 

New concealed pistol bill clears Michigan House

Feb 25, 2015
Handguns.
user Ben Re / Flickr

The State House has approved legislation that would overhaul the way Michigan approves concealed pistol licenses.

The legislation would abolish county gun boards which approve the licenses. Those duties would go to county clerks with the State Police conducting background checks.

State Representative Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, says the gun boards sometimes discriminate against applicants.

Pages