halloween

Don't tell the kids, but there is a way to get rid of all that candy.
rochelle hartman / Flickr

It goes without saying that you should NOT tell your kids about these dentists and their plan to buy their hard-earned candy back.

But if you find your house inundated, this just might be a good option - and who knows, maybe the kids will participate if they know there's a little money involved (the dentists pay $1 per pound of candy).

Morguefile

It's that time of year when we think about things going bump in the night.

So what if you believe a real ghost has taken up residence in your house and you want to move away? Do you need to tell potential buyers about your uninvited guest?

Michigan law is hazy when it comes to the seller's duty to disclose non-physical or so-called psychological defects of property, according to Gregg Nathanson, a Michigan real estate lawyer.  Haunted houses would fall into that category of property.

The Jewish Museum / Flickr

Harry Houdini died in Room 401 at Grace Hospital in Detroit 88 years ago this week.

How did this world-famous magician and escape artist come to die in Michigan? John Cox, a Houdini historian, has the answer.

This Halloween, ‘trick or treaters’ may be greeted by more than the usual scary sights and sounds in Michigan.

Many homes will have teal colored pumpkins on their doorsteps. 

The teal pumpkins are a sign that that house will be handing out special treats to children with food allergies.

Veronica LaFamina is with the group ‘Food Allergy Research and Education’ or FARE.   She says one in 13 children have a serious food allergy.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - Can't get enough of zombies, or wish they'd die - again - already?

  Just in time for Halloween, a discussion planned near Detroit's Wayne State University will inform those on either side of undead debate.

  Wayne State Assistant English Professor Chera Kee brings her zombie wisdom Tuesday to the Knowledge on Tap speaker series. She'll present The History, Lore and Growth of Zombie Culture at The Whitney's Ghost Bar.

user: Sarah_Ackerman / Flickr

Mount Rushmore, one of our great nation's most iconic monuments was finished 72 years ago today. Harry Houdini died 87 years ago today. 

But all of that is unimportant.

It is Halloween, and Americans have been getting ready for months. What better reason to shell out about $75 dollars on costumes, decorations and candy?  (Answer: so many things.) 

(If you're one of those people who is just scanning this article for the scary costumes, scroll down.)

Flickr user Terry.Tyson / Flickr

 You drive around most neighborhoods these days and there is absolutely no doubt we love Halloween.

Once upon a time, you carved a pumpkin, popped in a candle and put it on your porch to greet trick or treaters.

Now, homes are decked out with giant webs and big spiders, ghouls and witches, and don't forget the lights. Halloween is now second only to Christmas for consumer spending.

Just when and where did this all begin? And how far back does Halloween go here in Michigan?

We turn to historian and contributor to the Detroit News Bill Loomis for the answers. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Ann Arbor residents were warned about a potential danger lurking around the city today.

These are likely the smaller, softer, and less dangerous versions of true velociraptors.

Be alert today!

CreativeCelebrationsMagazine.com

Twice as many children die in car-pedestrian accidents on Halloween than on an average day the rest of the year. That’s according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.   

Michelle Macy is a clinical lecturer of emergency medicine at the U-M Medical School. She says adults should be more cautious than usual when taking young children trick or treating in busy neighborhoods. 

"While they’re in elementary school, kids don’t have the ability to judge the distance that a car is or the speed that it’s approaching at…they need to be told to wait and stop and let the cars go past before they try to run out ahead of it," said Macy.   

Macy urges parents to make sure their children dress in costumes that don’t restrict their vision this Halloween.

user vvracer / Flickr

Michigan optometrists say be careful if you plan on wearing decorative contact lenses as part of your costume this Halloween.  

The cat’s eye and other eerie looking contact lenses have grown in popularity in  recent years. 

Matt Maki is the president of the Michigan Optometric Association. He said if worn inappropriately decorative contact lenses could seriously damage a person’s eyes.   

Assuming they fit appropriately …worn appropriately….handled appropriately by the patient they’re fine.   I have personally fit these for patients.  Like I said, as long as it’s done appropriately there’s not an issue," said Maki.  

Maki urged people planning on wearing decorative contact lenses this Halloween should learn how to properly clean and disinfect them.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

Officials in Detroit and Flint will turn to volunteers this weekend to help discourage Halloween-related arson fires.   

Dozens of volunteers are expected to patrol their neighborhoods and man police mini-stations during the weekend.   

Tanya Meeks is the Flint Police Department’s community liaison officer.  She says having extra eyes on the street help.    

user brother o'mara / Flickr

Detroit school cited for overcrowding

Last week, the Detroit News reported on overcrowding in DPS classrooms. They reported on 55 kindergartners in a class at Nolan Elementary School, and that a science course in a DPS high school had 72 students. Now there's news of one school being cited by the city's fire department.

From the Detroit News:

A Detroit public school was cited Tuesday by the Detroit Fire Marshal's Office for overcrowding after a parent complained to fire officials that too many children were in her son's kindergarten class.

Lt. Gerod Funderburg of the Detroit Fire Department said the fire marshal's office issued a citation at Nolan Elementary School, 1150 Lantz.

"They went out today and issued a ticket for overcrowding," Funderburg said.

Detroit home prices on the rebound?

Home prices have been sliding in Detroit prior to the Great Recession, but there are some good signs in Detroit.

The Detroit Free Press reports:

Low inventories of homes on the market and increased demand have hoisted metro Detroit home prices by 6.1% since the beginning of the year, according to research by IHS Global Insight.

So are home prices finally on the rebound after five years in decline -- or is this a temporary lull before another big drop during the fall?

Most industry experts don't expect a huge drop, but IHS has forecast another 5% to 10% home price decline nationwide before recovery begins.

An analyst told the Free Press that because Detroit entered the housing slump before the rest of the country, it might recover ahead of the rest of the country as well - especially as the region adds more jobs.

Smashed pumpkins on the morning commute

From the Associated Press:

It was no treat driving on a Detroit-area freeway after a truck dumped a load of pumpkins during the morning commute.

Hundreds of pumpkins were scattered Wednesday across several lanes of traffic on eastbound Interstate 696 in Farmington Hills.

Many of the pumpkins were pulverized as drivers passed through. Video from a traffic camera showed motorists slowly making their way through the pre-Halloween mess.

WWJ-AM reports snow plows later were used to clear what remained of the pumpkins from the roadway.

Michigan State Police Sgt. James Kemp tells the Detroit Free Press that one motorist had a smashed  windshield, but no injuries were reported.

Kemp says police stopped the truck and the driver could be cited for having an unstable load.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

Flint city leaders are working with neighborhood watch groups and others to prevent an outbreak of arson fires this weekend. 

Flint firefighters have battled dozens of suspicious fires in abandoned homes for months.

 City leaders are concerned arsonists may step up their activity this Halloween weekend.

 Police officer Tanya Meeks is the liaison officer between the Flint police department and local volunteer groups.