WUOMFM

health

United Soybean Board / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Minding Michigan is Stateside’s ongoing series exploring mental health and wellness issues in our state. Today, the focus turns to suicide.

One person in Michigan dies by suicide around every six hours, and according to the CDC, men are four times more likely to die by suicide.

The state is making a concerted effort to reach out to men through a project called Healthy Men Michigan. The goal is to promote mental wellness among men in our state aged 25-64.

um hospital complex
Paul / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The University of Michigan is reaching out to donors, offering better access to its hospital’s doctors, for an annual fee.

For $2,700 a year, a patient can take advantage of what’s known as a “concierge medicine” service the hospital is calling Victors Care.

Three months after adopting a plant-based lifestyle, Ramirez had lost 45 lbs and was off all five of his daily medications.
Marc Ramirez

Today at Detroit's Eastern Market, there will be a celebration of all things vegan. It's called V313.

Organizers promise food from local vegan restaurants, music by local "plant-powered musicians," and educational speakers. 

Marc Ramirez will be moderating the Vegans of Color panel discussion. He's the co-founder of Chickpea and Bean, a nonprofit which hopes to raise awareness and educate people on the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle. He's also a former football player for the University of Michigan.

MEDDYGARNET / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

Does Michigan have a shortage of nurses?

That question is at the heart of a push by nurse advocates and some lawmakers for a state law that would set up mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios and prohibit hospitals from ordering nurses to work overtime.

Cigarette packaging with surgeon general warning
Melania Tata / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

 

The TV series "Mad Men" was set in the 1960s, and its creators went to great pains to make it look as authentic to the era as possible.

That means just about every character smoked. Everywhere. All the time.

Ariel Dovas / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Digital technology has infused our lives. And while it brings many benefits, we’re paying a price for having our brains constantly plugged into the digital world. At special risk: children and adolescents.

Just what is the effect of screen time on kids and parents, and what should we do about it?

Chandra Krishnan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Lt. Gov. Brian Calley today activated the State Emergency Operations Center to coordinate the state’s response to an outbreak of hepatitis A.

fruit bar at a school cafeteria
U.S. Department of Agriculture / FLICKR - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Is ketchup a vegetable? How about the tomato paste in pizza sauce? 

For decades, what we feed our children for lunch when they're at school has been as much about politics as it has been about health. 

Flickr user trinitycarefoundation / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In every country in the world, women are more likely than men to experience more stress, chronic disease, anxiety and be victims of violence. Yet, women live longer than men. Why? 

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, COURTESY DR. FLANDERS

The warnings about "superbug infections" and over prescribing antibiotics have been getting stronger and louder in recent years. Yet, it's still happening and we are seeing people die from infections that are caused by these so-called superbugs.

The Centers for Disease Control, for example, is telling us that every year 75,000 Americans with hospital-aquired infections are dying while they're in the hospital.

 

Dementia rates are going down. That’s even though dementia risk factors like diabetes are rising. What’s behind the decline in dementia? Dr. Ken Langa, associate director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Michigan, says higher levels of education and better treatment of diseases that lead to dementia could have a lot to do with it.

 

$340 billion dollars: a new study estimates that’s how much it costs Americans every year for daily low-level exposure to chemicals that mess with our hormonal systems. The figure includes health care costs and lost earnings. 

Dr. Leonardo Trasande is an associate professor of pediatrics, environmental medicine and population health at NYU School of Medicine.

Tyler Scott, Michigan Radio

Camping has been popular in Michigan for generations.

From the shores of the Great Lakes to expansive forests, this state offers magnificent sights, scenery and campgrounds.

And researchers at the University of Michigan say spending more time outdoors has mental health benefits.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report on the nation’s health says Michigan is taking a few steps forward and a few backward. 

This is the 26th year the United Health Foundation has released its America’s Health Rankings report.    Michigan’s place on the rankings didn’t change much.   The state moved from 34th to 35th on the list this year.  

The Foundation’s Rhonda Randall says like other states, Michigan is continues to struggle with a rising obesity rate.

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Especially in the early years of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, soldiers burned their waste in big, open-air pits. They burned everything from tires, batteries, and plastic to human and medical waste.

Curtis Gibson is an Air Force veteran. He served in Afghanistan in late 2011.

“I’d see things floating in the air — burned papers — you see them floating through the air so you know you’re taking something in,” Gibson says.

He says he had a medical exam when he came home to Detroit.

Rebecca Williams/Michigan Radio

In Afghanistan and Iraq, especially in the early years, soldiers burned their waste in big, open-air pits. 

“A burn pit’s just a big hole in the ground. You push dirt up and just have trash there, and light it on fire and walk away,” says Army veteran Eric Mullins.

Mullins and I met up in Campus Martius Park in Detroit, near where he works.

He served in Iraq in 2003 and again in 2008. On his first tour, he was assigned to burn barrels of human waste.

Flickr / Sarah Craig, Faces of Fracking

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that between 25,000-30,000 new oil and gas wells were drilled and hydraulically fractured annually in the U.S. between 2011 and 2014.

A feature article in the journal Health Affairs says the body of research on the potential health effects of all this fracking is "slim and inconclusive."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new report gives Michigan mixed grades on the state of people’s health.

The United Health Foundation ranks Michigan near the middle of its annual report. The state ranks 34th overall.

Hawaii topped the rankings, while Mississippi sits on the bottom.

user: vitualis / flickr

LANSING – Michigan health officials say they are investigating severe respiratory illnesses in children but haven't confirmed if the cases are associated with a national outbreak.

The Michigan Department of Community Health said Tuesday it's received reports of an increase in such illnesses and is working with local health agencies. Officials are forwarding samples to the Centers for Disease Control.

Cases of the suspected germ known as enterovirus 68 have been confirmed in Missouri and Illinois. The CDC is testing to determine if the virus caused illnesses reported in 10 states, including Michigan.

The virus is an uncommon strain of a common family of viruses that typically hit from summertime through autumn. The virus can cause mild coldlike symptoms but officials say these cases are unusually severe with serious breathing problems.

Courtesy of Children First

Recent reports show an early uptick in hand, foot and mouth disease.

The Kent County Health Department is seeing an increase of cases of the highly contagious virus, which normally occurs in August.

The virus is most common in children and is spread similarly to the common cold. Symptoms include fever, sore throat and sores on the mouth, hands and feet.

Lisa LaPlante represents the Kent County Health Department. She says the uptick could be attributed to public pools and playgrounds.

Water running from tap
jordanmrcai / Creative Commons

This week, the Environment Report is taking a look at Michigan’s silent poison — arsenic.

Federal standards allow public drinking water supplies to have arsenic levels of up to 10 parts per billion (ppb), but these standards do not apply to private well owners (that's left up to the well owner to determine).

And in counties throughout Michigan, some wells have much higher levels of arsenic than this "maximum contaminant level" set by the EPA.

Higher levels of arsenic in drinking water have been linked to skin cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer, among others.

But are lower levels of arsenic a threat to human health?

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A handful of Michigan county health department leaders say “health” should play a bigger role in local decision making. 

Health department officials from Wayne, Genesee, Ingham, Kent, Kalamazoo, Saginaw and Washtenaw counties met in Lansing this past week to strategize how to change the way local governments do pretty much everything. 

Linda Vail is Ingham County’s Chief Health Officer.   She says city and county leaders often fail to consider the potential effects their decisions will have on their community’s health.

cdc.gov

The fungal meningitis outbreak isn't that far behind us. 

Two years ago, a Massachusetts compounding facility sold tainted steroid medications around the country. What happened was disastrous: 22 Michigan residents lost their lives to meningitis and more than 260 were infected. 

New legislation could prevent that from happening again. A bill sponsored by Sen. Joe Hune, R-Hamburg, may be voted on this week. It calls for more background checks on compounding pharmacies and more facility inspections.

User: Don Harder / flickr

The controversy over long wait times and improper scheduling practices at Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics has cost the job of VA Secretary Eric Shinseki.

It led to an internal VA audit of its health care facilities.

And that has caused the VA to flag three facilities in Michigan for a closer look.

For this conversation, we asked what might be happening at those facilities, and what this means to veterans in Michigan.

We're joined by Detroit Free Press Washington reporter Todd Spangler and Dr. Joe Schwartz, physician and former Republican Congressman from West Michigan. Dr. Schwartz is now a visiting lecturer at the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan.

*Listen to the full interview above.

rick/ Flickr

The government wants pregnant women to eat more fish. Yesterday the FDA and EPA issued new draft advice that urges pregnant and breastfeeding women to eat at least eight to twelve ounces of fish a week.

The update comes 10 years after the last recommendation, which didn't specify a minimum.

The FDA is worried that fears over mercury levels in seafood have kept many pregnant women from getting enough of the nutritional value needed for their babies.

user Steven Depolo /Flickr

Childhood lead exposure costs Michigan about $300 million a year.

That's according to a report by the University of Michigan and the Michigan Network for Children’s Environmental Health.

They recommend lead remediation projects for around 100,000 houses throughout the state at a cost of $600 million. They say the program would pay for itself in three years.

Paul Haan is executive director of the Healthy Homes Coalition of West Michigan. He says more remediation programs would be a good long-term investment for the state. 

“At the end of the day we’re going to continue to pay the cost of the problem of lead poisoning if older housing is not remediated,” said Haan.

“So the question we really need to ask ourselves is do we want to pay the increased cost of suffering the consequences, or do we want to pay the lower cost of remediation?”

About 70% of childhood lead exposure comes from lead-based paint in older homes.

Earlier this week, the state Legislature approved an additional $500,000 for lead hazard control in next year’s state budget. The change is pending approval from the governor.

Haan says this shows that “public will is building and that state leadership recognizes the need for the kind of investments called for in the report.” 

– Reem Nasr, Michigan Radio Newsroom

getoverit.org

A basic tenet of the Affordable Care Act is preventive care: Get people into the health care system before disease or disability set in.

But that's highlighting a problem with our medical education system. Medical schools are turning out too many specialists and not enough primary care physicians. Cynthia Canty spoke with Dr. William Strampel, dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University. 

User: Vangore / Wikipedia

Seventy-five years ago, one of the most influential books ever written was published. It has sold over 30 million copies. And what's inside this book has changed the lives of millions of people around the world.

The official title of the book is "Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism" written by the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, Bill Wilson.

Dr. Howard Markel joined us today. He's the director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan. 

Wikipedia.org

Since January, Michigan hospitals have been dealing with the effects of a nationwide shortage of a critical supply of intravenous fluid.

The fluid is used in a wide variety of intravenous therapy, including chemotherapy. The shortage is blamed on reduced production and increased demand during the winter flu season.

Laura Appel is with the Michigan Health and Hospital Association. She says hospitals are working to share what fluid they do have.

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

Mar 18, 2014

Ever since the day Garrett Peterson was born, his parents have had to watch him suddenly just stop breathing.

"He could go from being totally fine to turning blue sometimes — not even kidding — in 30 seconds," says Garrett's mother, Natalie Peterson, 25, of Layton, Utah. "It was so fast. It was really scary."

Pages