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Stateside 6.1.2017

Jun 1, 2017

As more kids deal with mental health issues, a young Dexter man shares what got him through school on today's Stateside. And from Mackinac Island, the University of Michigan's president weighs in on access, funding, and the future of public higher education.

Spencer Walz
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Spencer Walz began struggling with anxiety back in grade school.

Now 25, he speaks from hard-won experience when he talks about helping young people struggling with mental health issues, and how best to help them overcome fears that talking about it will cause additional problems.

person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
flickr user frankileon / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is asking the state legislature to spend money from an upcoming lawsuit settlement on a public health campaign on opioid addiction. 

Opioids include illegal drugs like heroin as well as prescription drugs like Oxycontin.

Michigan is getting about $860,000 as its share of a national lawsuit settlement with Johnson and Johnson over a botched recall. 

Syringe
VCU CNS / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state wants more people in Michigan to have access to a drug that can save the life of someone who's overdosed on heroin or prescription painkillers.

A new state standing order pre-authorizes pharmacists to distribute naloxone, also known as Narcan, to anyone without a prescription. 

"It could be someone at risk for having an overdose or a friend, a loved one, a partner of someone who is concerned about a person at risk for an overdose," said Dr. Eden Wells, the state's chief medical officer.

A crushed red bull can on the street
psychopyko / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Energy drinks are omnipresent on college campuses. So is alcohol. Unsurprisingly, at college parties and bars, the two are often mixed together. How do such combinations of alcohol and caffeine affect young people?

That's what Aradhna Krishna explored in new research into alcohol and energy drinks.

two men sit at a desk
Detroit Public Television / YouTube

Crime is down in Detroit, but the homicide rate in the city is still high. For all the talk about Chicago's murder rate, Detroit's per capita rate is higher.

One of the newest efforts to deal with the violence is an intervention initiative called D-LIVE, which stands for "Detroit Life Is Valuable Everyday." The program treats violent crime as a health care issue and goes into the hospital to talk to gunshot victims. 

ryanknap / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Mental health therapy can take many forms. But what about running?

Sasha Wolff founded a group called “Still I Run.” The group's goal is to encourage people struggling with mental health issues to get out and run. She spoke to Stateside about running for mental health.

DMC says surgical instrument problems corrected

May 12, 2017
surgical instruments
AmazonCARES / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Detroit Medical Center officials say its problems with unclean surgical instruments are now fixed.

According to Dr. Tony Tedeschi, DMC's chief executive officer, the DMC has made substantial changes to improve its sterilization, inspection, reporting, and training systems.

"The processes that we have in place certainly ensure that no instruments that weren't completely sterile and safe would ever reach a patient," said Tedeschi.

person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
flickr user frankileon / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

Opioid addiction and meth use are making news almost every day, but tackling today’s drug epidemic isn’t easy. Treatments like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous might work for some who struggle with addiction, but not for others.

Surgeons operating on patient in operating room
Phalinn Ooi / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

On Thursday, the U.S. House approved a new health care policy designed by Republicans representatives to replace Obamacare. Each one of Michigan’s Republican representatives voted in favor of the replacement bill, while no Democrats (in Michigan or any other state) gave the bill their support.

Michigan Republicans were likewise united in the condemnation of Obamacare – also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Representative Tim Walberg, for instance, said, “Obamacare is on the brink of collapse and has failed to live up to its many promises.”

Representative John Moolenar called the ACA, “the collapsing health care law.”

Not everyone agrees with those assessments.

According to Nell Duke, developing literacy in children goes beyond just reading to them.
ThomasLife / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's well documented that literacy and reading are essential keys to success in life.

So what are some good ways parents can teach their children to make reading a central part of their lives?

Courtesy of the Detroit Health Department

Lead poisoning and infant mortality are two of the biggest problems facing Michigan.

Roughly seven babies out of every thousand born in Michigan do not live to their first birthday. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new Michigan State University survey finds most Americans remain ignorant of the signs of mental illness and drug use.

The survey found most Americans can't recognize anxiety, don’t know what to do about depression and don’t recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem.

MSU professor Mark Skidmore says, while more education is needed, progress is being made.

What caused the Flint water crisis?
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

It's been three years since Flint's ill-fated switch to the Flint River as its' drinking water source.

Then-Mayor Dayne Walling pushed the button that ended 50 years of getting Detroit water.

A Health Blog / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Community mental health groups fear that their funding and management could be transferred to private insurers.

The state House and Senate subcommittees on Health and Human Services passed their budget plans for the department this past week. Mental health groups say the Senate subcommittee's plan intends to privatize by 2020.

Similarly, Gov. Rick Snyder last year called for moving the $2.5 billion of community mental health money and management to private insurers. The House's proposal did not call for moving the money or management to private insurers.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A new study shows Michigan’s air quality continues to improve, but the American Lung Association warns those gains could be lost. 

The association’s "State of the Air" report finds ozone and particulate pollution is declining nationally, and in Detroit and Grand Rapids in particular.

Marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A new study from the University of Michigan finds that levels of first-time marijuana use among college students are at a 30-year high.

The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, says 51 percent of college students ages 19 to 22 became first-time marijuana users in 2015. That's up from 41 percent in 2014 and 31 percent in 2013.

michigan state capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This is a big week for the future of mental health care in Michigan.

All the complexities aside, which have been covered at length on Stateside over the last year, essentially it comes down to one question: Should the mental health services remain in the control of public entities like Community Mental Health centers, or should private insurance companies take the lead?

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

As the weather gets warmer, health officials in one Michigan County are urging residents to be aware of the danger of Legionnaires' disease.

Legionnaires' disease is a respiratory infection that can turn deadly.

Between 2014 and 2015, 12 people died of Legionnaires in Genesee County.  In all about 90 people fell ill.    Numbers declined sharply in 2016, but the number of cases was still higher than normal.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan lawmakers are introducing legislation to help fight rising opioid abuse.

  A group of bipartisan lawmakers is looking to tackle the drug epidemic in Michigan through a variety of ways, including health education in schools and creating prescription limits on opioids. They also are promoting the use of an updated database that monitors prescriptions.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan health officials are dealing with a second case of measles.

The unidentified adult appears to have contracted the serious viral infection from the first patient. The first patient is a child who lives in southeast Michigan. Both are recovering.

The two are not related. Researchers say the two were passengers on the same international flight last month.  

A woman in a dark room
https://www.flickr.com/photos/alachuacounty/12178605035/

 

 

When mental illness strikes a loved one, the first person many families turn to is often a faith-based leader: a priest, a minister, a rabbi, or an imam.

The Ninth Annual Muslim Mental Health Conference aims to help clergy do a better job of helping members of their congregation who are suffering from mental illness.

The conference will run April 13-14th at the Michigan State University Department of Psychiatry.

Flickr user trinitycarefoundation / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In every country in the world, women are more likely than men to experience more stress, chronic disease, anxiety and be victims of violence. Yet, women live longer than men. Why? 

person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
flickr user frankileon / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan is updating what state officials call a useful tool for fighting the opioid epidemic.

The problematic state drug monitoring program has gotten a significant facelift. The system is used primarily by law enforcement and doctors to flag potential prescription drug abuse and better treat patients. 

Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley chaired the task force that recommended the system update. He said tracking medications is an important tool for doctors, especially when it comes to potential opioid abuse by a patient.

Thanks to the Community Mental Health Authority in Lansing, Jerri Nicole Wright is 26 years sober and is on the "road to recovery".
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The future of mental health in the state of Michigan is at a crossroads. Governor Rick Snyder has $2.4 billion in mental health care funding to spend. Lawmakers and advocates on both sides of the health care debate are trying to determine who should manage that money.

Jerri Nicole Wright is a Lansing resident and longtime consumer of state mental health service. She joined Stateside to talk about her journey through Michigan's mental health care system.

Hospital bed
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

The weight of terminally-ill patients can play a role in the type of treatment they receive toward the end of their lives.

Stateside 3.28.2017

Mar 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, a new study links childhood lead exposure to lower IQ in adults across socioeconomic status. And, the mystery of Michigan's most famous UFO sighting lives on.

New Zealand had some of the highest lead and gasoline levels anywhere in the world, which meant that the small town of about 150,000 people in the South Island that was studied, had higher than expected lead exposure levels.
Ronald Dueñas / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Switching Flint to water from the Flint River had devastating effects for residents, particularly its children. 

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha first sounded that alarm in the summer of 2015. Her tests proved that after Flint switched the source of its drinking water, blood lead levels in Flint kids skyrocketed.

And that was later confirmed by a CDC analysis. It found that children who drank Flint water had a 50% higher risk of dangerously elevated blood lead levels than before the switch.

That analysis couldn't say exactly how many kids were affected, or what their futures hold.

A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association may hold some answers. Researchers from Duke University studied childhood lead exposure and adult outcomes.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Health officials are concerned about a growing outbreak of Hepatitis-A in southeast Michigan.

Hepatitis A is a viral disease that attacks the liver.     It’s not usually fatal.  But two of the 107 patients recorded in Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties since last August have died. 

“We do think that there are various pockets of this Hepatitis A,” says Dr. Eden Wells, the chief medical executive with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, “We’re not sure what’s driving it, but it is contagious.”

pixanay

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, remains the law of the land for now.

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