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healthcare

Cristian Newman @ismaelnieto

If most people over the age of 65 will need long-term care, what will that look like, and will they be able to afford it? That’s what State Representative Jon Hoadley wants the state to study. He and other lawmakers are backing bills to measure that cost and come up with some funding options.  

Hoadley says people turn 65 every day, but the long-term insurance market is unstable.

“All that together means that a storm is coming,” he says. “We have an opportunity with this bill to get ahead of this problem.”

Sarah Slocum specializes in elder care for a nonprofit health group. She says the state needs to know what all that long-term care will cost.

“We’ve been working very hard in the advocate community, from the department, from the provider prospective to make improvements in long-term care,” Slocum says. “But the puzzle that we have not yet unlocked is financing and how to make that really work across the spectrum.”

The state report wouldn’t make recommendations, but it would outline some options for lawmakers such as tax credits and reinsurance to improve the marketplace. The bill received its first committee hearing last week.

A Detroit-area doctor accused of intentionally misdiagnosing hundreds of Michigan kids with epilepsy has reportedly left the country, according to plaintiffs' attorneys.  

The case against Dr. Yasser Awaad has been dragging on for almost 10 years now. Some 250 patients and their families filed a class action suit in 2008, claiming they came in to see the pediatric neurologist with symptoms like headaches, only to be told they had epilepsy and needed extensive treatments, medications, and sometimes, surgeries.

gary peters
Senate Democrats / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Yesterday, a North Korean official indicated his country might soon test a hydrogen bomb over the Pacific, while the nation’s leader Kim Jong-un has called President Donald Trump “deranged.”

money
Pictures of Money / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Republicans have failed, so far, to pass a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), much to the visible frustration of President Trump.

There’s now a third attempt, the Graham-Cassidy bill, gathering steam in the Senate for a possible vote next week.

At the same time, the White House is being accused of trying to strangle the ACA by slashing funding for navigators, the groups who help people get health insurance.

Photo by freestocks.org on Unsplash

One of the toughest things about being a parent in Flint right now is the uncertainty. If your kid gets diagnosed with ADHD, or struggles in school, there’s a part of you that wonders: is it because of the lead exposure?  

Debbie Dingell in front of a desk.
Tyler Scott / Michigan Radio

Michigan Representative Debbie Dingell, D–Dearborn, says she’s been working with a bipartisan group of House members to come up with ideas for healthcare reform.

“We need to work together to fix [healthcare],” Dingell said. “The Affordable Care Act isn’t perfect. I have been committed and have reaffirmed that this month. I’m working with my colleague Fred Upton and others to find where that common ground is.”

John Auchter

Ideas for cartoons can come from the oddest places.

This past Sunday, I was working on setting up our hammock in the backyard for the summer season and went down to the basement to collect the pieces. 

doctor looking at chart
CommScope / Flickr - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

The Next Idea

Usually, when we hear the word “hacking,” we think of someone breaking into something — like your computer or customer data at a credit card company. But there’s a constructive, positive spin on the word hack too.

A2 Health Hacks is a weekend-long exercise where people come together to find new solutions to old problems in health care.  

A piggy bank, stethescope and bundle of one dollar bills
401(k) 2013 / Flickr

The U.S. Senate is considering the American Healthcare Act. That’s the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

One of the industries at the center of the health care reform debate is, of course, health insurance. Terri Kline is President and CEO of Health Alliance Plan, a subsidiary of the Henry Ford Health System.

sign that says flint
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A major lawsuit over the Flint water crisis has been settled. Under the deal, the state will pay for the replacement of 18,000 lead service lines. This Week in Michigan Politics, Morning Edition host Doug Tribou and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about why the deal might set a precedent for other cities.

Protestors in Detroit stand on Woodward Avenue with signs showing their disapproval of President Trump and the GOP's American Healthcare Act.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Protestors marched in downtown Detroit today for what was called a – seven years from the day the ACA was first signed into law.

 

 

Many of the protestors said they're afraid they and others will lose their health insurance coverage if Obamacare is repealed.

 

 

Henrietta Ivey, a home care physician in Detroit, spoke at the march on behalf one of her patients who is in rehab due to kidney issues. 

 

 

“If he didn’t have that Affordable Care Act, he would not be able to get the care and rehab that he’s having right now,”

Christoper Sessums / Flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

For the last couple days, I, together with a million or so of my fellow Michiganders, have been living a sort of 19th century life.

By that I mean that we’ve been living without power, electricity or heat, thanks to the freak windstorms that whipped through much of our state.

Now, we’re not quite in the same boat as Abraham Lincoln. He didn’t have Double-A batteries, nor could he go to a motel with internet access, which is how I am broadcasting today.