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Hillary Clinton

As you may have heard, Jill Stein, the Green Party presidential candidate, is asking for a recount of the vote in the three key states that decided the election – Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and our own state of Michigan, which was the closest of all.

The Clinton campaign, or whatever remains of it, doesn’t hold out any real hope that the outcome will change, but supports the recounts, on the ground the public ought to be assured of the integrity of the process. 


user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Republican Donald Trump is officially the winner of the presidential race in Michigan. A state elections board certified the results today, but now a recount looms.

This afternoon, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers will, in all likelihood, certify the results of the November 8th election - bringing Campaign 2016 to an official close and opening the door to Recount 2016.

Unprecedented

Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania are about to become the center of the U.S. political universe as the Green Party and its presidential candidate, Dr. Jill Stein, try to upset the order of things and make elections officials in those three states go back and check their work.

According to Halderman, pink counties have a paper trail. Blue counties do not.
Image courtesy of J. Alex Halderman

A blog post in New York Magazine has been sweeping around the internet because it calls into question the results of the 2016 presidential election.

Cheyna Roth / MPRN

In this Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss the results of Election 2016, now that the dust has had time to settle.


United States Department of Education / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Little kids have a lot of questions about the election right now. And for parents, those conversations can be painful. Or comforting. Or sometimes, just hard to navigate.

Kids learning through the election that "there are dishonest people" 

Bill Pickens is an organic farmer from Dundee who used to be an engineer. He says he and his wife have four kids under the age of 8 right now. They lost their fifth child to SIDS last year, and now, they’re pregnant again.  

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The presidential candidates and their surrogates swung through Michigan on the final day before the polls opened.

President Obama was in Michigan as part of a tour of battleground states. The president tried to drum up support for Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Democratic ticket during a rally in Ann Arbor.

Obama spoke to a crowd of about nine thousand people at the University of Michigan. He told first-time voters in the audience that this year has been a strange one in politics. The president said he’s been frustrated by a lot of the news coverage of the campaign.

Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at Grand Valley State University the day before Election Day.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

The election is tomorrow, but if you thought the major party candidates were going to take a break, you would be wrong. Michigan has secured its position as a battleground state.

Both major party presidential candidates are stopping in West Michigan in the hours before the polls open.

Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talked jobs and the economy during a rally at Grand Valley State University. But she also focused on bringing the country together after a very divisive election.

A photo of a Trump supporter's trailer-parade float called "The Unity Bridge" to showcase his support for Donald Trump, taken a few blocks from where Barack Obama was speaking.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Several protestors expressed their disapproval of Hillary Clinton while President Barack Obama did some last-minute campaigning for her in Ann Arbor today.

While thousands of people waited to see Obama speak, cars plastered with signs supporting Donald Trump and Mike Pence drove by. One such car played political ads against Clinton from large speakers.

Robert Cortis built a so-called "Unity Bridge" onto a trailer towed by his car to showcase his support for Trump.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The major-party candidates are making a final push to win Michigan.

Both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will be stopping in Michigan, once again, between now and Election Day. In fact, Trump will be making two stops.

Trump will rally supporters this afternoon in Sterling Heights. The GOP nominee is also expected to be back late Monday night for an election eve rally.

Trump’s running mate Mike Pence will campaign in Traverse City Monday. 

Lower Community College / Creative Commons

The presidential race is not over in Michigan.

Donald Trump doesn’t think so. New polls show his 13-point gap has been narrowed to three points in just two weeks. That’s why two of his kids hit the state again. It’s why his running mate was here. It’s why Trump is looking to land here sometime over the weekend.

Hillary Clinton speaking at Detroit's Eastern Market.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Hillary Clinton was back in Michigan today. The Democratic presidential nominee made a stop at Detroit’s Eastern Market for a rally.

Clinton was greeted by thousands of spectators and several times she encouraged them to vote and even take a friend when they go to the polls.

People kept coming into the venue even after Clinton started. Clinton clearly tried to woo Detroit’s large African American population. She referenced rival Donald Trump’s lawsuit for housing discrimination and his past characterization of black life in Detroit.

user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

With the clock ticking down on the presidential campaign, Michigan and its 16 electoral votes are in the spotlight.

The candidates and the high-profile people campaigning for them are virtually tripping over each other as they criss-cross the state.

Yesterday Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr., former President Bill Clinton, and Bernie Sanders were in Michigan. Today, Ivanka Trump is in Rochester, and Indiana Governor Mike Pence campaigns in Portage.

And there will be more rallies tomorrow. First Pence in Lansing, and then Hillary Clinton in Detroit’s Eastern Market, and Eric Trump will work his way through Michigan.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes all this activity proves the Mitten is in play.

There is less than a week before Michigan voters go to the polls.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

High-profile allies for the Clinton and Trump campaigns will be in Michigan Wednesday. 

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-VT, will be stumping for votes for Democrat Hillary Clinton in Kalamazoo and Traverse City. Clinton will need Sanders' supporters. They gave him the win in Michigan’s presidential primary earlier this year.

Donald Trump Jr. has stops planned at college campuses in East Lansing and Allendale.  His sister, Ivanka will be meeting with a businesswomen's group in Troy on Wednesday evening.  

About 13% of Michiganders are undecided – enough to possibly make a difference this year
User: Keith Ivey / flickr

The vast majority of reputable polls show Hillary Clinton winning Michigan by pretty comfortable margins – single digits, maybe, but still comfortable.

Campaign signs stacked against a wall in a union office.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Political parties are gearing up their “get-out-the-vote” efforts as the 2016 election enters its final days.

Unions have been a critical part of the Democratic Party’s get out the vote efforts for decades. This past week, union leaders held a get out the vote rally in Flint.

Becky Pringle is the vice president of the National Education Association. She says “they have work to do” convincing union families to support Hillary Clinton.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson spoke to a small but enthusiastic crowd in Detroit last night.

“Don’t vote for Trump ... Don’t vote for Clinton,” shouted Johnson to several hundred supporters gathered at Cobo Center.  

The crowd cheered Johnson’s calls for eliminating the U.S. Department of Education, dismantling the Department of Homeland Security and pardoning Edward Snowden. 

Before the rally, Gary Johnson told reporters his “small government” message is “resonating” with voters --  at least the ones his campaign is able to reach.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s little more than two weeks left before the November 8 election.

Recent polls have shown Democrat Hillary Clinton holding a double-digit lead in Michigan.

Stephen Neuman is the senior adviser for the Michigan coordinated campaign. 

He says they are now looking to use those poll numbers to help Democrats down the ballot.

“We are working to include targeted House races, both targeted state House and congressional races, on the various scripts we use both on the phones and at the doors,” says Neuman.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

ST. IGNACE, Mich. (AP) - Presidential nominee Donald Trump is trying to put Michigan in the Republicans' corner for the first time in two dozen years by taking aim at trade deals and an economy that's left blue-collar workers behind.

Democrat Hillary Clinton says the billionaire businessman is no friend of workers because of using Chinese steel in his construction projects and opposing the auto bailout.

In the middle are voters, who say they're split over the candidates' trustworthiness.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s sagging poll numbers in Michigan may be behind a surprising rise in TV ad buys in one state congressional race.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton told a crowd in Detroit Monday that we can expect "a positive message" during the last month of her campaign.

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou discuss whether that will resonate with Michigan voters. Lessenberry and Tribou also look at a Detroit Free Press investigation that finds the state may have overpaid for supplies it bought in response to the Flint water crisis, and the teacher shortage that continues to plague Detroit Public Schools.


Type some words like “will the Republican Party survive this election” into any search engine, and you’ll find stories predicting its coming collapse.

Without any doubt, the GOP is now being torn by an internal civil war, and most of its key figures privately or publicly have written off Donald Trump’s chances.


Clinton speaks to supporters in Detroit Monday
Rick Pluta/Michigan Public Radio

One day before the voter registration deadline in Michigan, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton says she’s going to spend the last month of the campaign delivering "a positive message."

At her campaign stop in Detroit today, Clinton laid out her economic plans, like raising the minimum wage, guaranteeing equal pay for women, and making sure students can graduate from college debt-free.

flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

The aftermath of last night’s presidential debate has left the Republican Party in all-out crisis mode.

An NBC-Wall Street Journal poll following the release of the tape of Donald Trump making lewd comments about women shows Hillary Clinton’s lead over Trump is now in the double digits.

House Speaker Paul Ryan today held a conference call with House Republicans. He said he can’t and won’t defend Trump, and that House Republicans should do what’s best for them in the remaining weeks of the election.

But, he will not rescind his endorsement of Trump.

What does this all mean for Republicans on the down-ballot in Michigan?

woman holding sign that says women for trump
Rick Pluta / Michigan Radio

A couple dozen Donald Trump supporters waved signs outside a rally in Detroit Monday for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Rosanne Ponkowski was one of those pro-Trump demonstrators. She carried a sign that said “Women for Trump.”

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will make a post-debate stop Monday in Detroit.

This will be Clinton’s first Michigan visit since August 11th. The trip coincides with the October 11th deadline to register to vote in the November election.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has made five trips to Michigan since the Republican national convention.

The Clinton campaign hopes to avoid an Election Day surprise like the presidential primary loss to Senator Bernie Sanders last March. Sanders campaigned for Clinton in Michigan last week.

John Auchter / WWW.AUCHTOON.COM

A common question these days is, "How did it come to this? How did we end up with these presidential candidates?" The simplest answer is, "It's our fault." Would a curious, engaged, and active electorate have generated the current tickets? Probably not.

senator bernie sanders at podium
Cheyna Roth / Michigan Public Radio Network

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders was in Michigan Thursday to campaign for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

He crisscrossed the state with stops in Dearborn, Ann Arbor, East Lansing and Grand Rapids.

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty (left) interviews Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT) with Stateside Executive Producer Joe Linstroth in Ann Arbor on October 6, 2016.
Mitchell Rivard

Republicans and Democrats have made it clear that the state of Michigan is in play for the 2016 presidential election.

Another high-profile campaign visit to the state comes in the form of Vermont senator Bernie Sanders. He is making stops in four cities (Dearborn, Ann Arbor, East Lansing, Grand Rapids) stumping for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

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