Hillary Clinton

Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio/lawrence.house.gov

 

The first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton was held last night. A large segment of the debate was about racial healing in the United States.   

Both candidates have been pursuing African-American and Latino voters.

Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence and Linda Lee Tarver, co-chair of the Trump-Pence Michigan African American Advisory Committee, joined us today to take a look back at last night’s debate.

donkey and elephant standing on american flag
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump face off in their first presidential debate tonight.

One Michigan group hopes to hear the candidates discuss “family economic” issues.

Michigan’s 1st Congressional District is huge - almost 25,000 square miles - and it is where, with the pending retirement of Republican Congressman Dan Benishek, former Marine Corps General Jack Bergman – a Republican – is facing former Michigan Democratic Party Chair Lon Johnson.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new poll by Epic MRA on behalf of the Detroit Free Press and other news media outlets across the state shows that Donald Trump has cut into Hillary Clinton's lead in Michigan. 

Clinton still leads, but with 38% compared to Trump's 35%. 

Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party presidential candidate, is also gaining ground with 10%.

Amariyanna Copeny, 9, of Flint, Mich. with Donald Trump
imgur.com

A picture of Donald Trump and "Little Miss Flint" has people on the internet talking.

Amariyanna Copeny, aka Little Miss Flint, and her mother Lulu Brezzell attended Trump's visit to Bethel United Methodist Church in Flint on Wednesday.

Brezzell took the picture of her daughter's encounter with Trump where the Republican presidential candidate is smiling and appears happy, while Amariyanna doesn't.

Tracy Samilton/Michigan Radio

Emidio "Mimi" Soltysik says his run for president under the banner of the Socialist Party USA banner is more of an organizing project than a traditional campaign.

Soltysik described that project to a group of about 20 people at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Wednesday night. With his calm and gentle demeanor, the former musician comes across more as a guru of socialism than a fiery revolutionary.

The purpose of his campaign is to get people "plugged in" to their communities, he says, not get the most votes possible.

Senator Tim Kaine is coming to the University of Michigan on Tuesday
PROjoelrivlin/flickr commons

Senator Tim Kaine is campaigning in Ann Arbor on Tuesday afternoon.

The Democrats' pick for vice president will talk about getting out the vote, especially for younger voters.

Ann Arbor is, of course, pretty liberal leaning, and Kaine will talk to a college crowd at the University of Michigan.

Many motorists cars honked their approval (some expressed their displeasure) at Trump supporters in Saginaw.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Donald Trump campaign staged rallies today in cities across Michigan.

Dozens of Trump supporters took over two corners of one of Saginaw’s busiest intersections.

Local campaign organizer Debra Mantey says this is the way for the Republican nominee to win in Michigan.

“The way we’re going to turn Michigan ‘red’ is by face-to-face, with Michigander to another Michigander,” says Mantey.

Mantey downplays polls showing Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leading in Michigan. She says recent polls showing Trump gaining ground.  

Presidential campaign merchandise.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A conservative group is running ads this week in Michigan and three other states asking Republican Donald Trump to withdraw from the presidential race.

The ad features Donald Trump saying he would get out of the race if his poll numbers were bad.  The quotes date back to when Trump was riding high during the Republican primaries.

Flickr user Jim Fruchterman/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

From the time Hilary Clinton first ran for President in 2008, former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm has been one of her most vocal and visible supporters.

She was recently named part of Hillary Clinton’s transition team.

Michigan Radio’s Rick Pluta spoke with Granholm to learn what her responsibilities would be in the Hillary Clinton administration, if Clinton is indeed elected.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Democrats will hold their state party convention in Lansing on Saturday.

This weekend’s convention may end up reflecting former presidential candidate’s Bernie Sanders' policies as much as party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire
Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

A big section of Michigan’s economy is being targeted by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, 98.2% of businesses in Michigan are small businesses. The SBA defines a small business as one with fewer than 500 employees.

I heard over the weekend from a retired night city editor from an Ohio newspaper who sent me an article from the New York Post about media bias and the presidential election.

He, and the authors of the article, believe the mainstream media is outrageously in favor of Hillary Clinton. Not that the old editor was especially a Donald Trump supporter.

“There’s never been an election with two less-qualified candidates,” he said, but added, “but that still doesn’t give journalists the right to choose sides so blatantly.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm is part of the team planning Hillary Clinton’s move into the White House if she wins the presidency in November.

The Clinton campaign announced its White House transition team this morning.

Clinton tapped former U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to lead her White House transition team. Salazar will chair a team that includes Granholm, former National Security Adviser Tom Donilon, and longtime Clinton allies Neera Tanden and Maggie Williams.

How much of a role will the state of Michigan’s economy play in deciding your vote in November? Last week, the presidential candidates acted as if it might be a big deal as they both made stops in Michigan to deliver speeches on jobs and the economy. 

Michigan, and Detroit, in particular, remain economically emblematic. But there are two stories to tell and the candidates each packed a different one for the trip. 

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were in Michigan this week to deliver big economic speeches. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about each candidate's fiscal vision, and whether it will resonate with voters. Lessenberry and Kruth also discuss the latest move in a battle over straight-ticket voting in the state.


According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Warren this week to lay out her economic vision for the country. The speech was also intended to counter the speech given by her Republican rival, Donald Trump, at the Detroit Economic Club. 

Michigan State University economics professor Charley Ballard joins Stateside to break down the speech.

flickr user Gage Skidmore/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton made stops in Michigan this week to give their big economic speeches. 

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas joined us today to talk about those speeches and how they might impact the presidential race.

John Auchter
Auchtoons.com

ARTISTS POV:

In the cartoon series South Park, there is a classic episode titled "Gnomes." In that episode, a high-strung, over-caffeinated boy named Tweek is freaked out when gnomes repeatedly sneak into his bedroom at night to steal his underpants from his dresser. Tweek tells his fellow grade-school friends about the gnomes, but they don't believe him.

According to Charley Ballard, the biggest difference between Trump and Clinton is their stance on immigration.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Millions of Americans would be put to work if Hillary Clinton is elected president. That was the promise the candidate delivered in Metro Detroit Thursday. Clinton said Republican nominee Donald Trump is presenting a dismal and incorrect picture of Michigan’s economy. She pushed pack at Trump’s economic plans while at an advanced manufacturing plant in Warren.

Hillary Clinton addressed the 2016 SEIU international convention in Detroit this May.
SEIU / via Twitter

Hillary Clinton will pitch her economic plan in Macomb County Thursday.

Clinton will speak at Futuramic Tool & Engineering, a Warren auto parts supplier that’s branched out into defense and aerospace.

It comes just days after Donald Trump shared his economic vision with the Detroit Economic Club.

It will be a very different crowd. In Warren, Clinton will try to win over some of Macomb County’s famed Reagan Democrats — white, blue-collar voters.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou talk about whether Donald Trump's fiscal strategy speech to the Detroit Economic Club on Monday will resonate with Michigan voters. Lessenberry and Tribou also discuss Hillary Clinton's upcoming visit and whether she'll take a sunnier view of the state's present and future. They also look at legal challenges to requirements for putting a question on the statewide ballot.


Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are both coming to Michigan this week which begs the question: is Michigan in play come November?

flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Donald Trump is set to give what’s been billed as a “major economic policy speech” to the Detroit Economic Club today.

He’ll try to score points with a business-friendly audience that might be uncomfortable with some of his rhetoric, and his positions on issues like trade.

According to the poll, Governor Snyder's approval rating has fallen to 39.7%.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll from The Detroit News and WDIV-TV gives us a look at how Michigan voters are feeling one week into general election campaign season. 

Chad Livengood of The Detroit News joined us today to talk about the findings. 

Here's how 600 likely general election voters said they would vote come November:

  • 41.0%   Hillary Clinton (Democrat)
  • 31.6%   Donald Trump (Republican)
  • 7.5%     Gary Johnson (Libertarian)
  • 3.4%     Jill Stein (Green)
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s state Democratic Party says his party is largely unified coming out of this week’s Democratic National Convention.

State chairman Brandon Dillon spent a lot of time during the four-day convention trying to calm and cajole Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters in Michigan’s delegation, not always successfully.

Still, Dillon says the news media has overstated the number of Sanders backers who plan to bolt the Democratic Party.

Matthew Meagher, left, is undecided; but his buddies are Trump supporters.
Kate Wells/Michigan Radio

All of Matthew Meagher’s buddies at this rally are big Donald Trump supporters.

One of them even volunteers with the Oakland County Republican party after work each night – the kind of guy who’s wearing a wool blazer and button-down shirt to this Mike Pence rally in suburban Detroit, even though it’s 80 degrees outside.

But for Meagher, a Kettering University student who’s going into IT work, he just can’t make up his mind.

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The final night of the Democratic National Convention will bring Hillary Clinton’s formal acceptance of the party’s presidential nomination.

Her acceptance will mark a historic week for the Democrats, but also a week of disappointment for Bernie Sanders supporters. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint Township, was in attendance during Tuesday’s roll call vote, where he had a chance to reflect on this year’s election cycle.

“My thoughts were far less about politics,” Kildee said. “I thought about … my five-year-old granddaughter, who will now grow up in a country where that glass ceiling has been broken.”

Michigan helped put Hillary Clinton over the top last night, officially making her the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee.

“The next president of the United States, Hillary Clinton,” U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow said as she delivered Michigan’s official vote at the Democratic National Convention. 

Stabenow says she was overcome by emotion seeing her party choose the first woman to be a major party presidential nominee.   

Clinton delegate Sunny Sahu expects now the divisions within the party can heal.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Union members have been a key voting demographic in Michigan for decades.

Historically, they’ve been a reliable voting bloc for Democrats. But in 2016, the Trump campaign hopes to change that. 

Hillary Clinton can pretty much write off Joe Kinder’s vote. He’s a retired Ford UAW worker.   

“As far as Clinton goes, she can’t be trusted," says Kinder. "I wouldn’t vote for her."

Kinder, like other members of organized labor, believes the North American Free Trade Agreement, signed by former President Bill Clinton, was a bad deal for American workers.

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