flickr user Texas Military Forces / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The city of Holland in West Michigan has certainly made its Dutch heritage known. If the name alone isn’t enough for you, the city has held an annual Tulip Time Festival, celebrating all things Dutch for the last 86 years.

But there’s a sizeable Hispanic community in Holland. The latest census numbers indicate Hispanics make up 23% of the city’s population.

flickr user Texas Military Forces / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Latinos have been a presence in Michigan for more than a century. But even after all those decades, the Latino population is still experiencing significant growing pains.

That's the conclusion of a major report from the Michigan State University Julian Samora Research Institute titled, "Latinos 2025: A Needs Assessment of Latino Communities in Southeast Michigan."

Sugar skulls are part of the Day of the Dead tradition.
User: Michael Perini / Michigan Radio

We're coming up to Halloween, but as we get our bowls of candy ready and kids decide on their costumes for Friday night's trick-or-treating, some people in Michigan preparing for another holiday: Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos.

The holiday has spread from Mexico throughout the world, including here in the United States.

It coincides with All Hallows' Eve (Halloween to most of us), All Saints' Day on Nov. 1 and All Souls' Day on Nov. 2. 

It's a time to honor and pray for friends and loved ones who have passed away.

raquel4citycouncil.org / Facebook

Raquel Castaneda-Lopez is the newest member to the Detroit  City Council representing District 6 in Southwest Detroit,​ which includes the largest concentration of Hispanic voters in the city.  Lopez gained political experience running state Rep. Rashida Tlaib’s campaign in 2008. She has worked with non-profit groups for years with a focus on youth programs in disadvantaged communities.

Lopez says she want to keep the focus on the needs of her constituents - safety and access to city services for example. 

Check back later for more coverage on Michigan's six ballot proposals.

As Rick Pluta reported earlier, two Michigan townships could be affected by the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on the Voting Rights Act announced today.

The Voting Rights Act requires that the federal government approve any changes to voting procedures in areas with a history of discrimination.

In Michigan, Buena Vista Township and Clyde Township were both required to submit any proposed changes to their voting rules to the U.S. Department of Justice.

The Voting Rights Act covered areas where more than 5% of the population spoke a language other than English. In these areas, bilingual ballots were required. Both Buena Vista Townships and Clyde Townships had Hispanic populations above 5%.

An English-only ballot in these places was considered to be a discriminatory 'device', according to the The New York Times.

Zane McMillin of MLive reports on some of the requirements Clyde Township had to follow: