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HIV

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The Detroit Health Department is now bringing sexual health right to residents’ doorsteps with a new free mail-order condom program.

Any resident of Detroit, Hamtramck, or Highland Park can fill out a form on the Department’s website with their postal address and basic information. A few days later, a plain brown envelope containing 12 condoms will appear in their mail. Residents can reorder condoms as many times as they need.

The HIV virus
typographyimages / Pixabay

Medical experts in Michigan say reducing the stigma of HIV is key to stopping the spread of the disease.

A package of bills in the state Legislature would update the state’s laws. That would include changing the criminal penalty for someone who doesn’t disclose they have HIV to a sexual partner. Right now it’s a felony to not disclose – even if the partner doesn’t get HIV. The bill would make it a misdemeanor and require the partner actually get HIV.

MDHHS
Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

According the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS), the number of reported cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the state increased from 2016 to 2017.

A statement released Wednesday said there was a 9 percent rise in Chlamydia cases, a 22 percent increase in gonorrhea, and a 28 percent increase in primary and secondary syphilis. MDHHS says these statistics reflect a national trend toward rising reports of STDs.

According to MDHHS, all sexually active individuals should be seek prompt treatment if they test positive for an STD.

Judge's gavel
Flickr user Joe Gratz / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0


A recent legal case in Cass County is raising questions about HIV disclosure laws in Michigan.

Trevor Hoppe is a sociologist who specializes in sexuality, HIV and the law. His research studies are titled Punishing Disease and he is co-editor of The War on Sex, a forthcoming collection of essays that examines the criminal regulation of sex.

Hoppe wrote a piece in the Huffington Post about an HIV-positive man in Cassopolis, MI, named Corey Rangel.

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

A Detroit woman has reached a settlement with the city of Dearborn, after her HIV-positive status became an issue during a traffic stop.

Shalandra Jones told Dearborn police officer David Lacey she had HIV after he found her medication during a vehicle search in 2012.

Lacey chastised her for not revealing that immediately.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Aids_Day_Ribbon.png

Health officials across the state are urging people to get tested for HIV. Monday is World AIDS Day.

There are an estimated 21,300 people living with HIV in the state, according to Michigan’s Department of Community Health. The number of diagnoses outpaces deaths associated with the virus, so the number of people living with HIV is up.  

MDCH reports an average of 809 new cases were diagnosed each year from 2008 to 2012.

Almost two-thirds of those living with the virus live in metro Detroit. The impact on black males is the greatest.

Michigan awards $2.5 million for HIV-AIDS prevention

Feb 5, 2013
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The state of Michigan today awarded $2.5 million for HIV-AIDS prevention and intervention in urban communities throughout the state.

Some of the cities that will directly benefit from the fund include: Detroit, Kalamazoo, Dearborn, Ypsilanti, Saginaw, Lansing, Ferndale, Grand Rapids, Muskegon, and Flint.

The University of Michigan Health System
The University of Michigan

A new $21 million grant will establish a Center for HIV RNA Studies at the University of Michigan.

The National Institutes of Health grant will be distributed over a five-year period and is intended to help researchers better understand the virus on a molecular level.

From the University of Michigan:

I can only imagine, thinking you might have been exposed to HIV might be one of the scariest things of a person’s life.  Am I infected?  Will I get AIDS? 

Even more traumatic, is contracting it because you were sexually assaulted.

David—not his real name— says he was at a bar one night late in 2009.  He was hoping for a ride home.  He ended up at another man’s house and they had sex.  David says it was unwanted, that it was sexual assault.

“He doesn’t think he assaulted me.  So, uhm.  But, he was going to against my will.”

needle
hitthatswitch / Creative Commons

Clean Works Needle Exchange began ten years ago. At the time it was very controversial for Grand Rapids city commissioners to adopt local laws that would give drug users access to clean syringes.

Tami VandenBerg leads the non-profit that runs the Clean Works Needle Exchange. She says they provide clean needles for about 600 people a year.