home ownership

Stateside
5:56 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Michigan’s foreclosure activity drops, as nationwide number hits lowest since 2006

Is America climbing out of the foreclosure hole dug during the Great Recession?

That's the question tackled in reports from Realty Trac, which keeps a close watch on real estate data. Its Midyear 2014 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report is out today.

The report shows that U.S. foreclosure activity in June decreased 16% from a year ago to lowest level since July 2006, the month before the housing-price bubble burst. In Michigan, the foreclosure activity was also back to a lower level than the number before the housing bust.

Daren Blomquist, a Vice President with Realty Trac, discussed three reasons behind this slowdown in foreclosures.

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Families & Community
12:07 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Detroit residents: Developer is trying to force us out of homes he doesn't own

Model homes offered by the Gratiot McDougall United Community Development Corporation
Credit via city of Detroit

A group of Detroit residents says a developer is trying to throw them out of homes he doesn’t even own.

Developer Peter Barclae built the Gratiot McDougall Homes in 2006 with the help of federal grant money.

The homes were built specifically for Detroit participants in the federal HOME Investment Partnerships program, run by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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Politics & Culture
5:28 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Stateside for Monday, December 16th, 2013

The Great recession and the accompanying housing meltdown changed the way many of us think about home-ownership. For decades, owning a home seemed to be part of the American Dream, but that dream has changed. On today’s show -- the rise of renters and what it means for the state’s housing market.Then, this month marks the 100 year anniversary of one of the most painful chapters in Michigan’s labor history. We explored the Copper Country Strike of 1913 later in the hour.

And, the U.S. birth rate is at a record low as more and more married couples choose to remain child free. We spoke with the director of the Childless by Choice Project about what goes behind this choice and what are the future consequences.

First on the show, Back in 2010, the State Board of Education approved the Common Core State Standards for Michigan — a set of math and English goals for K-12 students.

School districts across the state have spent the past three years integrating the standards into their curriculums. At the same time, we've heard a lot of political debate about Common Core, mostly about the involvement of the federal government in our classrooms.

But in October of this year, state lawmakers OK'd funding for Common Core, and now it is becoming a reality in Michigan classrooms.

We wanted to find out: What does this mean — day-in, day-out — for Michigan's students?

What does a school year under Common Core really look like?

Joining us is Naomi Norman, the executive director of Achievement Initiatives at Washtenaw Intermediate School District and Livingston Educational Service Agency.

Stateside
5:10 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Is it better to buy or rent a house in Michigan?

Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

If you're a baby boomer, chances are you grew up with your parents pounding one basic truth of life into your head, and that truth was that you are always better off owning your own home rather than renting.

Well, the Great Recession and its housing meltdown certainly gave us some new thoughts on renting versus buying.

An Oakland County developer remarked that of late, he's seen more baby boomers deciding to skip home ownership and go with renting.

We wondered how things are looking in Michigan, the housing market and renting versus buying.

Daren Blomquist, Vice President of RealtyTrac, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
2:32 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Home prices are 'going strong,' which means more home equity loans for homeowners

Home prices are on the rise. Maybe not for these two, though.
JasonParis Flickr

We see Michigan home prices, by and large, climbing back up from the depths of the Great Recession. 

Detroit-area home prices were 16% higher since less than one year ago. That's according to the Standard & Poor's Case-Shiller home price index. That means that home prices in the six counties of southeast Michigan are higher than they've been since 2008. 

Rebounding home values means that more people are able to tap into cash through home equity loans. But, if you're eyeing a home equity loan, be careful.

That's the advice from Detroit Free Press personal finance columnist Susan Tompor.

To listen to the audio interview, click the link above.

Stateside
5:02 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Dearborn puts limits on what a garage can be

Flickr user carywaynepeterson Flickr

An interview with Jeff Karoub of the Associated Press.

There's been a new development in the debate over garages in Dearborn.

You may recall some residents in Dearborn have been using their garages as gathering spaces, some equipped with sliding glass doors, couches, refrigerators, water pipes, and TVs. This has been especially popular with Dearborn's large Arab community.

This week, the Dearborn Planning Commission approved changes in rules governing the way Dearbornites may use their garages, and there are those in the Arab community who feel these rule changes are a direct slap at them.

Jeff Karoub has been covering this debate for the Associated Press and he joined us today from Detroit.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Garages should not be used as living spaces, according to Dearborn city officials

Dearborn city officials say they don't want garages to become "habitable" places for cooking/sleeping because garages aren't built to the same standards as the rest of a home
Flickr

An interview with Jeff Karoub of the Associated Press.

Should homeowners be allowed to do pretty much whatever they want with their garages, as long as it doesn't bother neighbors?

That's the essence of a growing debate in Dearborn, where a desire by some residents, largely Arab-Americans, to use their garages as living space is being met with resistance at City Hall and the prospect of tighter garage ordinances.

Jeff Karoub is with the Associated Press, covering issues pertinent to the Arab-Muslim community, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Auto/Economy
11:59 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Changing Expectations: Considering every variable is difficult, if not impossible

Angela Dugan

Michigan Radio is partnering with Changing Gears to share stories about how people are planning ahead and how their expectations have changed in light of the recession. You can read those stories here.

Angela Dugan writes:

I am doing better than my parents, mostly because I am not a stay at home mother like my mother was. I also make more money than my husband.

We are working on starting a family, and I am struggling with the decision to stay at home or continue to work. It is both a question of what’s feasible economically, and what is best for our children.

My biggest concern is being able to afford a lifestyle that we are happy with if I choose to stop working once we have children. I make more money than my husband, so it would be a big change unless he ends up being the one that stays home. We are currently renting a home we could not sell, but at a huge loss, and our new home needs a lot of repair work.

To some extent, I feel that even though I’m doing the best I can to invest wisely and save as much as I can, a lot of variables are simply out of my immediate control.

You can help us cover this topic by sharing your story. How are you planning for what comes next? Tell us by following this link.

This story was informed by the Public Insight Network. If you want to learn how to be a part of our network, click here.