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President Donald Trump’s inaugural speech stands out in history.

“I think it is the only inaugural address that I’m aware of that declared war on the establishment – both Republican and Democratic, and anything in between,” said Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University. “I mean, it just was saying, ‘A new sheriff is in town and we’re going to do things differently.’”

Courtesy of Lena Epstein

 

 

Lena Epstein, a resident of Bloomfield Hills and former co-chair of Trump's Michigan Campaign, had an "up-close and personal seat" for the historic inauguration of President Donald J. Trump.

She says she and her husband had tears in their eyes as they watched the peaceful exchange of power amidst the "very patriotic" and "supportive" crowd.

 

Trump’s address moved her, she says, especially when he mentioned Michigan, one of "the states that have felt forgotten for so long."

Tashmica Torok (left) was one of the many women from Michigan that made the trip to the Women's March on Washington.
Courtesy of Tashmica Torok

Washington D.C. officials say half a million people marched in the nation’s capitol on Saturday. Another one million people joined rallies around the country, according to estimates; plus big crowds around the world, from London to Berlin, Tokyo to Antarctica.

Tashmica Torok of Lansing was one of the Michiganders who made the trip to Washington. Torok is executive director of the Firecracker Foundation, a group that works with child survivors of sexual trauma, and she joined Stateside to talk about her experience and her motivation for going.

The Many Faces Of Inauguration Day Attendees

Jan 22, 2017

People traveled to Washington, D.C., from around the country to witness the transition of power to the 45th president of the United States. Amid celebration and clashes, a few faces stood out. Watching giant screens, blocks away from the incoming president, these people braved crowds and weather to watch history being made.


Ken Crider and his wife, Penny

Age: 51

City of Residence: Detroit area

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Several students worked diligently on signs and hats to carry and wear in Saturday's Women's March on Lansing. It's a sister march to a larger event happening in Washington, D.C.

While the Japanese use our calendar for practical purposes, they officially start a new era every time an emperor takes office. This is, for example, Heisei 29 in Japan, not 2017.

We do a version of the same thing. We talk of the “Clinton years,” or the “Bush years,” and even link cultural events to the reigns of our presidents, none of which last more than eight years. We talk about Reagan-era fashions, for example.

Donald J. Trump takes the Oath of Office and becomes the nation's 45th President.
White House

Donald Trump became the nation's 45th President at noon on January 20, 2017. 

We provided live annotations and analysis of Trump's speech. NPR reporters, editors, and producers transcribed his remarks in real time and provided footnotes with analysis, context, and fact-checks.

You can watch the inauguration here, or below:

Courtesy of Debbie Dunphy

Tomorrow is the inauguration of Donald Trump. There will be a parade, of course, and the Mid America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team from Michigan will be marching in it.

The team’s horses and riders made the trip to Washington from Three Oaks, Michigan, located in the southwest corner of the state.

Pam Weiss is armed with some good walking shoes for the Women's March on Washington.
Courtesy of Pam Weiss

Hundreds of thousands of people are expected to participate in the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday, the first full day of Donald Trump's presidency.

Pam Weiss of Ann Arbor plans to hop on a bus tomorrow to join the march in Washington.

For Weiss, it's not just about being anti-Trump.

Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

On Jan. 20, Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as our 45th president of the United States.  The election was one of the most contentious in recent memory and has exposed or inflamed serious divisions in American society. All this week on Stateside, we’ll speak with Michiganders who were drawn to the President-elect’s message about their hopes for the new administration.

Jules Pastorino is a 19-year-old woman and a University of Michigan student. If she were to sit down with President-elect Donald Trump, she would urge him to reign in the surveillance powers of the National Security Agency (NSA), tell him that climate change is “not a conspiracy” and ask him to consider the importance of abortion rights.

Those are concerns that Pastorino shares with many Hillary Clinton voters. But in 2016, her first election, Pastorino voted for Donald Trump.

A Minute with Mike
Vic Reyes

Hello, my fellow Michiganeers, it’s your friendly neighbor-radio hood Mike Blank. Just in case you’ve been trapped in an abandoned copper mine in the Upper Peninsula since November and you haven’t heard, we’re about to get a new president.

I try not to focus on political issues during our brief time together. However, the one thing that stood out about this election to me was the staggering number of people who did not vote. Roughly 47% of registered voters stayed away from their local school gymnasium, church, or community center on Election Day. And it wasn’t because of the funky smell.

Courtesy of Renee White

On Jan. 20, Donald J. Trump will be sworn in as our 45th President of the United States.  The election was one of the most contentious in recent memory and has exposed or inflamed serious divisions in American society. All this week on Stateside, we’ll speak with Michiganders who were drawn to the President-elect’s message about their hopes for the new administration.

Renee White is a substitute teacher from Manistee. She’s also a mom worried about her kids in today’s economy.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Detroit's Democratic mayor will serve as master of ceremonies for the inauguration of Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and Lt. Gov. Brian Calley in Lansing.

  Mayor Mike Duggan joins Snyder and Calley Jan. 1 at the Capitol. Snyder said in a news release that Duggan "has been a great partner in the effort to reinvent" the state and city.

whitehouse.gov

Events in Washington Monday honored President Obama’s inauguration, and the Martin Luther King Day holiday.

The two events also meshed at Detroit’s Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, where a few dozen people came to the Wright Museum to watch a live broadcast of President Obama’s second inauguration.

Stateside: Second inaugural addresses throughout history

Jan 21, 2013
the-athenaeum.org/art/detail.php?ID=14476

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Today, President Barack Obama delivered his second inaugural address.

According to Gleaves Whitney, many second addresses are somber and straightforward.

Whitney directs the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University, and he spoke with Cyndy about the history of inaugural addresses.

“I think that Eisenhower was the first and only president to write his  prayer into the inaugural address,” said Whitney.

George Washington’s second inaugural speech was the shortest in history, said Whitney.

“Second inaugural addresses usually occur after the president has been chastened by experience. The lofty optimism that often characterizes first inaugural addresses is missing," he continued.

For the entire interview, listen to the above audio.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Stateside: Military spouses march in today's inaugural parade

Jan 21, 2013
Military Spouses of Michigan / Facebook

The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above.

Among the groups that represented Michigan in today's inaugural parade was the Military Spouses of Michigan.

Jocelyn Benson, who also serves as dean of Wayne State University's Law School, is the president of the group.

The group is about a year old and provides support for spouses of service members throughout the state.

Benson spoke with Cyndy from the parade.

"It's so exciting because we honor our veterans but too often our military families are on the sidelines. To be able to recognize their sacrifices today is incredible," said Benson.

Every child marching with the group seemed to have enjoyed the experience, she noted.

"Instead of feeling isolated, we're able to provide that camaraderie for each other," said Benson.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Governor Rick Snyder
Photo courtesy of governorelectricksnyder.com

Governor Rick Snyder begins his first full week of work at the state Capitol today, Laura Weber reports. Snyder was sworn in as the state's 48th governor on Saturday. He told a crowd in front of the Capitol building that the state needs to move into the future with a positive attitude.

It is also time to be bold. I’ve been cautioned by many that expectations are already too high. We shouldn’t walk away from high expectations, it’s time to deliver on high expectations.

It's expected that Snyder will start signing his first executive orders to reorganize state government as soon as this week.

Photo courtesy of www.governorelectricksnyder.com

Governor-elect Rick Snyder's inaugural day activities have been confirmed.  The governor-elect will be sworn in as Michigan's 48th governor on January 1st, 2011.  According to The Detroit Free Press, here's what we know:

  • The inaugural will last just one day.  Previous Michigan Governors' inaugurations have continued over more than one day and in multiple cities.
  • Governor-elect Snyder will take the oath of office at noon outside of the Capitol building in Lansing.  That will be followed by a receiving line that will take place inside.
  • An inaugural celebration will take place at 8 PM in East Lansing at Michigan State University.  Tickets are required for the event at a cost of $125.

Swearing in ceremonies will also take place on January 1st for Lt. Gov.-elect Brian Calley, Secretary of State-elect Ruth Johnson and Attorney General-elect Bill Schuette.

Photo courtesy of www.governorelectricksnyder.com

Governor-elect Rick Snyder takes the oath of office in Lansing on January 1st, 2011 and The Detroit Free Press is reporting it will be a low-key affair.

Geralyn Lasher will be Snyder's Communications Director.  She told The Detroit Free Press that the Snyder inauguration will not be lavish:

We want people to have the opportunity to participate in a celebration. But there's going to be work to do the day before and the day after ... and the day after that.

Last month The Associated Press reported that Snyder will take the oath of office outdoors and give his inaugural speech on the Capitol steps.

Photo courtesy of www.governorelectricksnyder.com

It's being reported this morning that Governor-elect Rick Snyder's transition team will announce co-chairs of Snyder's inaugural planning committee today.

The Detroit News reports:

Michigan Grocers Association President and CEO Linda Gobler and Patricia Mooradian, president of The Henry Ford, will co-chair the inauguration planning committee... Snyder's inauguration will include typical features such as the swearing-in and an inaugural ball, as well as other features, spokesman Bill Nowling told The News.

 The theme of the inauguration: The Power of MI.  Snyder will be sworn in as Michigan's 48th Governor on January 1st.