Jack Lessenberry

President Snyder?

Jan 20, 2015

 As you probably know, Governor Snyder gives his State of the State speech tonight, two hours before President Obama gives his annual State of the Union address. We also know that America will get a new president exactly two years from today.

Last week, Governor Snyder turned some heads by vetoing three things the lame-duck legislature sent him, and by taking on Senate Majority Leader Arlan Meekhof over prevailing wage.

It’s no exaggeration to say that Governor Rick Snyder’s first term was largely a disappointment to many environmental organizations. The League of Conservation Voters, which had endorsed Snyder in 2010, did not do so last year.

The Real RINO is?

Jan 15, 2015

For years, hard-right Republicans have been denouncing moderates by calling them RINOs – Republicans In Name Only.

Saving Energy

Jan 14, 2015

As everybody who isn’t in solitary confinement knows, gasoline prices are now unbelievably low. So is inflation, and as a result there is less interest in energy conservation these days. Sales of electric vehicles and even hybrids are down, and there doesn’t seem to be as much interest in them from reporters gearing up for the annual auto show in Detroit.

Over a Barrel

Jan 13, 2015

Regardless of your politics, you have to feel a little sorry for Governor Rick Snyder. He tore a tendon jogging in Florida on vacation, and is on crutches and in a cast.

Cockeyed Agenda

Jan 12, 2015

I am lucky enough to have a wonderful local electrician, which is a good thing if you live in an almost ninety-year-old house. He works hard and knows what he is doing. If a job is too much for a single man or his skills, he is honest enough to tell me.

Detroit’s economic decline and population flight to the suburbs was a long and gradual process. But there was an iconic event that serves as a precise marker of when it started.

That would be March 1954, when the Lodge Freeway was completed and Northland, then the world’s largest open-air shopping center, opened at the freeway’s end, across the border in Southfield.

  

Six years ago, when President Obama first took office, the United States was in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Unemployment was heading towards nine percent.

Barack Obama walked into the Oval Office to find the previous administration had left a budget with a projected deficit of $1.2 trillion. He knew things would get worse.

I will be sixty-three years old in three months, and this was the first morning since I was three that I woke up and John Dingell wasn’t a member of Congress.

Maternity leave

Jan 6, 2015

I teach at Wayne State University, which, more than any other school in our state, offers working people a chance at a first-class education. Last year, I had a woman enroll in two of my classes who was obviously heavily pregnant.

Every so often, the justice system gets it wrong. Take David Gavitt of Ionia. He spent twenty-six years in prison after being convicted of setting a fire that burned down his home and killing his wife and daughters.

Well, we’ve come to the end of the year, and I do have a little good news: There are already three more minutes of daylight than on the year’s shortest day. There’s a long winter ahead, but at least that’s something. And while Detroit certainly faces a lot of difficult challenges, the year ends with the city in better shape than when it started.

Patricia Hill Burnett was a folk hero of sorts in a most unlikely way. Wealthy, glamorous and Republican to the core, she was nevertheless a feminist who was a co-founder of the Michigan chapter of the National Organization for Women back in 1969.

She became a legend in Detroit, where she might hold court one day at the fashionable Midtown Café, and the next day lead a sit-in at the Detroit Athletic Club, which then did not allow women.

Well, it’s Christmas Eve, the official start of a holiday that long ago became as much a secular as a religious one. Tonight and tomorrow, we mark an occasion in which Americans of nearly all faiths  celebrate our strenuous attempts to please the gods of retail sales.

Early indications are that we’ve done fairly well.

In some ways it was easier to be a journalist back in the old pre-cyber days. Yes, the technology was harder to manipulate and information was harder to get. Yes, some of us actually worked in a world without Google.

When President Obama announced last week that we would restore diplomatic ties with Cuba, it wasn’t that big a story in Michigan. For one thing, we were still waiting to see what our lame-duck legislature would do about the roads. And there aren’t many Cuban-Americans here.

There’s a great deal of celebrating over the fact that the Legislature reached a last-minute deal to fix the roads. Gov. Rick Snyder and the establishment Republicans are happy.

There’s a reason college professors historically were given tenure. It was so they couldn’t be fired for politically unpopular views.

Ron Kagan has been head of the Detroit Zoo for more than 20 tumultuous years. During that time, he fought off an effort by Detroit City Council to close the zoo and helped win its independence years before the city’s bankruptcy gave the art institute its own near-death experience.

He’s also led a transformation of the zoo from a somewhat tired park to a leader in worldwide conservation efforts and a much more exciting place.

The zoo’s Arctic Ring of Life is the nation’s largest polar bear exhibit; next year, a new penguin conservation center and wolf habitat will open. Attendance has swollen so much that Kagan is now facing the unwelcome chore of planning a new parking structure.

Four years ago, Michigan voters were asked if they wanted to summon a convention to write a new state constitution.

We said no, by a two-to-one margin. Nobody collected signatures to put that on the ballot, by the way. Under the current constitution, we’re automatically asked every 16 years if we want a convention to write a new one.

We’ll be asked again in 12 years.

But I now think the voters made a mistake in 2010. We may well need a new constitution, because there’s increasing evidence the old one, written in the early 1960s, no longer works.

Nearly a year ago, as car after car was damaged or destroyed by potholes, State Sen. Majority Leader Randy Richardville went to see his constituents in Monroe, a town between Detroit and Toledo.

Unions don’t represent as many workers as they used to, and we are increasingly ignorant of labor history, though it includes some of the most fascinating episodes in Michigan’s glorious past.

Detroiters woke up this morning in a city run by an exuberant, can-do mayor, in a city finally out of bankruptcy and with a spirit of optimism that hasn’t been seen for at least half a century.

It should already be perfectly clear why they call what the Legislature is doing now the “lame-duck session.” Much of what they are doing has been pretty lame.

Last night I talked to a woman in her 40s who grew up in a rural town in the northern Lower Peninsula and then lived for a couple decades in Boston and New York, before coming to Detroit for a job.

I had lunch the other day with Senate Minority Leader Gretchen Whitmer, who in a few weeks will be out of office for the first time in fourteen years. The last four years have had to be frustrating for her.

Last night I spoke to about a hundred thoughtful citizens, mostly of retirement age, at a forum sponsored by the National Council of Jewish Women. They were mostly great fans of Michigan Radio.

Several asked why I hadn’t said anything about the deaths of Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri, or Eric Garner,

There’s a time-honored political technique you might call the “big lie” theory. Basically, it works this way: If you tell the same outrageous lie over and over, no matter how big it is, eventually people will believe that at least some part of it is true.

More than 30 years ago, I had just become national politics writer for a Midwestern newspaper, and was sent off to cover a national Roman Catholic Bishops’ conference in Chicago.

I was somewhat indignant about that.

Pages