WUOMFM

Jeff Sessions

PBS live stream

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee this afternoon, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LAW SCHOOL

Forty-six U.S. Attorneys appointed by President Obama are packing up and cleaning out their desks today. This comes after Friday’s abrupt demand for their resignations from Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Among those asked to resign was Barbara McQuade of Detroit. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow is glad U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions this week recused himself from any future probes involving the possible Russian interference in the U.S. 2016 election.

Sessions failed to disclose two meetings with the Russian ambassador to the United States during the campaign.  Sessions insists the discussions did not involve the Trump campaign. 

Stabenow believes an investigation is warranted into possible links between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

U.S. Department of Justice

As the United States moves into the first week of the Trump presidency, there is some question as to whether the new president will follow through on his major campaign pledges. Some of his most controversial proposals involved the way his administration would relate to Muslim Americans, and Muslims hoping to come to the United States from abroad.

With regard to the latter, he called for an outright ban until, as he put it, “our country's representatives can figure out what is going on.” He also suggested during the campaign that he supported a registry or database of Muslims living in the United States.

So how are Muslim Americans preparing for life under the Trump administration?

Senator Jeff Sessions speaking at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, DC in 2011.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Alabama senator Jeff Sessions was nominated by President-elect Donald Trump to become the next U.S. attorney general, and some Michigan professors don't like it.

26 law school faculty members in Michigan signed a letter urging the rejection of Sessions as an attorney general candidate. More than 1,400 law professors nationwide have joined this effort.

Steven Gray, one of 13 law professors at the University of Michigan who signed the letter, said Sessions has a history of not fighting hard enough for civil rights.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

New state laws take effect Tuesday that will regulate Michigan’s medical marijuana industry.

The three laws taking effect will legalize medical marijuana dispensaries, regulate growing and processing facilities and extend legal protections to registered patients who prefer to use non-smokable forms of the drug, including edibles and oils.

It’s the first major update to Michigan’s medical marijuana laws since voters approved legalizing pot for medicinal purposes in 2008. 

Senator Jeff Sessions speaking at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, DC in 2011.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Some Detroit leaders, clergy, and activists spoke out against Donald Trump’s pick for U.S. Attorney General on Monday, denouncing him as someone who would “take us back to the Jim Crow era.”

They said Senator Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, has a particularly bad history when it comes to African-American voting rights, and other civil rights issues.

But Rev. Paul Perez, with the Detroit conference of the United Methodist Church, says that’s not the only area of concern.