mars rover

Stateside
4:57 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Let's take a roadtrip to Mars

Curiosity on Mars
NASA wiki commons

What would it take to get humans to Mars?

For the last seven months, NASA's rover 'Curiosity' has crawled all over the planet's dusty red Gale Crater.

As it explores, the rover has sent back all sorts of information to Earth for further investigation.

Most recently, a report of a rock sample collected by Curiosity shows that, yes, ancient Mars could have supported living microbes.

But let's go one step further. What would it take for human beings to get to Mars?

Ben Longmier is an Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering and researches electric propulsion, spacecraft design and basic plasma physics.

Michigan Radio's Cynthia Canty spoke with Longmier about the challenges and possibilities of getting humans on Mars.

Click the link above to hear the full interview.

2:48 pm
Mon August 6, 2012

U-M students, faculty cheer as NASA rover Curiosity lands on Mars

Lead in text: 
Read about U of M scientists' and space enthusiasts' reaction to last night's successful landing of Curiosity on Martian terrain after the dreaded “seven minutes of terror." Follow the link to also see the accompanying video reaction to the landing at NASA.
  • Source: Freep
  • | Via: Elaine Ezekiel
As the Mars Rover Curiosity raced towards the surface of Mars early this morning, tension was thick in both NASA's mission control and in an auditorium at the University of Michigan, where more than 100 faculty and students gathered to watch the landing. Nilton O.
Environment & Science
2:54 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

Michigan helps NASA go to Mars: UM scientists and the "Curiosity" rover

The rover "Curiosity," aka the Mars Science Laboratory
NASA wiki commons

The search for life on Mars takes a giant leap forward this weekend, and University of Michigan scientists are part of the mission. 

By now you’ve probably heard about the unmanned rover called "Curiosity." Set to land on the red planet Sunday night, it’s NASA’s most ambitious robotic operation yet. A science lab on wheels, the rover will scour Mars for any sign the plant could support life.

Read more