WUOMFM

medicaid

Paulette Parker / Michigan Radio

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell, D-Michigan, joined local officials today in Ypsilanti to talk about President Trump's suggested cuts to Medicaid. Trump's proposed budget would eliminate nearly $700 billion from the federal program. Dingell spoke in front of community members and constituents at Community Alliance, an organization that serves developmentally disabled adults in Ypsilanti.

Michigan Senate passes dental therapist bill

Oct 12, 2017
person having their teeth cleaned
Matt Lemmon / Flickr Creative Commons HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

State lawmakers are considering a new way to help underserved populations get dental care.

bill that passed the Senate 21-15 on Wednesday would authorize and license a new kind of mid-level dental professional called a "dental therapist."  

The legislation sets out educational and training requirements that would have to be met before dental therapists could perform basic dental care, like fillings and simple teeth extractions, that are currently handled by dentists.  

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A national crackdown on health care fraud has landed dozens of people in Michigan in trouble with the law.

The Medicare Fraud Strike Force, jointly run by the U.S. Justice and the Health and Human Services departments, has charged more than 400 defendants nationwide of fraud amounting to more than a billion dollars.

In Michigan, 32 people face charges, including fraud, kickbacks, money laundering and drug diversion schemes involving approximately $218 million in false claims for services that were medically unnecessary or never rendered.

Money
Andy / Flickr

President Trump’s proposed budget could mean trouble for southeast Michigan.

That’s the opinion of Congressman Sander Levin and more than 20 organizations in the area.

The congressman met with representatives from different organizations at risk of losing federal funding if the president’s budget is approved.

Levin says the proposed budget has very few positives, if any, for Michigan residents.

“I don’t want people to go hungry because of these cuts, I don’t want them to be in the cold without assistance for heat,” Levin said.

Images Money on Flickr / Creative Commons

New data from a nonpartisan think tank says Michigan would hit a financial stumbling block if the Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act passes.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities says the new health care bill would cost Michigan more than $582 million to maintain expansion in the next four years, and more than $1 billion by 2023. 

Inside the doctor's office.
Jennifer Morrow / Flickr

State officials and health care providers called on Washington lawmakers to keep the state’s Medicaid expansion Monday.

From doctors to the state budget director, the message is clear. Let the state keep its Healthy Michigan Medicaid expansion. In order to do that, the federal government needs to keep paying for it.

But right now lawmakers in Washington are churning out plans that don’t seem to coincide with this goal.

piggy bank, stethescope, and bundle of money
flickr user 401(K) 2012 / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Top officials in Gov. Rick Snyder's administration say it could cost Michigan up to $800 million a year to keep the state's Medicaid expansion program at current enrollment levels if cuts approved by the U.S. House are enacted.

State Department of Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon gave the estimate Monday during an event in which Snyder aides and advocates defended the expanded Medicaid program.

michigan state capitol
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

This is a big week for the future of mental health care in Michigan.

All the complexities aside, which have been covered at length on Stateside over the last year, essentially it comes down to one question: Should the mental health services remain in the control of public entities like Community Mental Health centers, or should private insurance companies take the lead?

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Expanding Medicaid was a key part of the Affordable Care Act. In our state, it's known as Healthy Michigan, and it has meant health care coverage for more than 600,000 people.

But if you wind up in the criminal justice system, even if its just pre-trial detention, Medicaid benefits turn off immediately.

Researchers at the University of Michigan say excluding inmates from Medicaid is driving up costs and hurting the health of inmates.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

We may soon see a draft proposal for how Michigan will handle more than two billion dollars in Medicaid funding earmarked for mental health.

The Snyder administration caused an uproar earlier this year when it backed a plan to further privatize the public nonprofit mental health system by turning over $2.4 billion in state funding to Medicaid HMOs.

Mental Health groups said this would put control of the money into the hands of out-of-state, for-profit insurance companies.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Update:  A federal judge's order that would have prevented Michigan from enforcing a state law to keep voters from taking photos of their ballot in the Nov. 8 election has been overturned. So for now, no ballot selfies on election day.

This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and I talk about the state's push to try and re-instate a ban on voters taking “selfies” with their ballots. We also discuss Gov. Rick Snyder's veto of legislation to overhaul Medicaid and the legacy of Tom Hayden in today's tumultuous political climate.


Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Governor Rick Snyder faces a decision soon on whether to sign or veto a bill he doesn’t like. It deals with how the state raises money for the Medicaid program. A plan adopted by the Legislature scraps a tax on health insurance claims. The bill would replace it with a complicated new funding system.

      

Snyder administration officials say the federal government would probably reject it, and deny the state many millions of Medicaid dollars. But legislative leaders want to push the issue.

      

Flint river
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Some Flint residents may be eligible for more healthcare benefits than they thought.

According to the "Care for Flint" campaign, the expansion of Medicaid has changed the income requirements for some services. 

"Care for Flint" is a collaboration of non-profits, churches, and grassroots organizations trying to find solutions to the ongoing water crisis.

Jamie Gaskin is the CEO of United Way of Genesee County and he says helping people understand their healthcare options is the goal of the campaign.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Expanded Medicaid coverage starts in Flint today.

The expanded Medicaid coverage was approved in response to the Flint water crisis.

Medicaid will cover Flint residents up to 21 years old and pregnant women. 

Dr. Eden Wells, Michigan’s Chief Medical Executive, says they’ve been “waiting for this day for a long time.”

“This city’s residents have been exposed to lead in their water,” says Wells, “This requires long-term access to good, comprehensive primary and specialty healthcare.”

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Flint residents are getting some relief when it comes to their water bills. But what about their medical bills? It’s a question some Flint families are asking.

Medical bills are adding up for Keri Webber. I met her over the weekend, volunteering at an open house for Flint residents.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The federal government has approved Michigan’s request to expand Medicaid eligibility in Flint. 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says pregnant women and people under 21 in Flint are now eligible for the expanded coverage.

The Snyder administration asked the federal government for the expanded Medicaid coverage, as part of its response to the Flint water crisis. There are concerns about the health effects of exposure to Flint’s lead-tainted drinking water. 

The expansion will affect an estimated 15,000 Flint residents.

Gov. Snyder's proposed budget would set aside over $100 million for the Healthy Michigan plan
Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder’s new budget contains over $100 million for Healthy Michigan.

That’s a reminder that it’s time for the state of Michigan to pony up some of the Medicaid expansion program’s operation cost. That Healthy Michigan program means health insurance for some 600,000 lower-income Michiganders.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The federal government appears close to approving at least part of Gov. Snyder’s request for a Medicaid expansion for Flint residents.

Snyder submitted a lengthy request to expand Medicaid coverage to thousands of Flint residents under 21 and pregnant women.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell met with local health officials in Flint to discuss the crisis.

She says no decision has been made on the governor’s Medicaid expansion request.

Governor Rick Snyder
Flickr user Michigan Municipal League / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

FLINT, Mich. (AP) - Gov. Rick Snyder is asking the federal government to expand Medicaid coverage to people under 21 and pregnant women who have been exposed to Flint's lead-contaminated water.

In a statement released Sunday, Snyder says about 15,000 more Flint residents would benefit if the government approves the request. The governor says the state would help by lining up doctors and behavioral health specialists and providing other services.

user clarita / morguefile

About 600,000 Michiganders will be able to stay on the state’s expanded Medicaid program.

The Healthy Michigan plan got a critical waiver approval from the federal government on Thursday.

The part of the program that needed approval requires participants with incomes between 100 and 133 percent of the federal poverty level to work with doctors to get healthier. Otherwise, they will have to get their insurance through the federal health care exchange. That requirement begins in April of 2018.

Inside the doctor's office.
Jennifer Morrow / Flickr

Patient advocates, doctors, and hospital-affiliated insurance companies are asking the state to reconsider a decision to reduce the number of HMOs that are part the Medicaid program that serves low-income families.

“This is a disruption of the most-vulnerable population that you can disrupt,” said James Connelly, CEO of the Health Alliance Plan of Michigan. He says his customers are low-income African-Americans and immigrants from the Middle East who are not fluent in English. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The future of Michigan's expanded Medicaid program is in the hands of the Obama administration.

Gov. Rick Snyder's administration this week submitted a waiver needed to ensure 600,000 low-income adults remain eligible for government-provided health insurance in 2016.

user clarita / morguefile

Hundreds of thousands of low income Michiganders are signing up for healthcare coverage under the state's recently expanded Medicaid plan. 

That expansion lets people who are slightly above the poverty line get on Medicaid. 

It was deeply controversial when it was approved in Lansing, largely because of its ties to Obamacare. 

But 100 days after it opened in April, more than 320,000 people signed up.

That's more people than were expected to sign up all year.

Sue Day / Flickr

Parenting a mentally ill child can be one of life's greatest challenges.

When you keep asking questions, keep searching for mental health care that can help your child, you may not get the right answers.

Michigan Radio's Sarah Alvarez is the Public Insight journalist for the State of Opportunity project.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

An anti-circumcision group says Michigan’s Medicaid program should stop funding for circumcision.

Michigan has one of the highest circumcision rates in the country.

Norm Cohen is the state director of the National Organization of Circumcision Information Resource Centers. Members of the group picketed at the state capitol today.  Many in the group wore white pants, stained in the crotch with red paint. 

The week in Michigan politics

Jul 2, 2014
The Michigan State Capitol
Aunt owwee / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This Week in Michigan Politics, Emily Fox and Jack Lessenberry discuss how Michigan businesses will be affected by the US Supreme Court ruling that corporations don't have to include contraceptive coverage for employees for religious reasons, what the state is doing to prevent more felons from being home health care workers for Medicaid patients, and the new budget bill for the state.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program is off to a fast start.  

Tens of thousands of people have signed up for the medical coverage in the first week since the enrollment opened.

The Healthy Michigan program has received nearly 55,000 applications since April first; 32,000 Michiganders have already had their applications approved. Tens of thousands more have been moved into the expanded Medicaid program from a different state health assistance program.

satellite map of Michigan, the Great Lakes
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Christina Shockley discuss the impact of a fourth member of the state's congressional delegation who won't seek re-election, Medicaid expansion, President Obama's trip to Michigan to talk about the minimum wage, and Detroit's latest plan for bankruptcy.

Today is the day. After months and months of debate, Healthy Michigan is here. That's the official name for the state's newly expanded Medicaid program. Today, on Stateside: Who is eligible for the new coverage and why are other states looking to Michigan for lessons learned?

Then, it made news: the merger between financially struggling Albion High School and its neighbor, Marshall. Now, more than halfway through the school year, we checked in on how the students are faring.

And, a new report is breaking new ground in the study of inequality among our children, and the findings for Michigan children are troubling.

First on the show, another hugely surprising retirement from Congress. Republican Congressman Dave Camp, who represents Michigan's 4th district, announced that he will not run again for re-election. Camp has served in Congress for 24 years and has been chair of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee.

Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, co-hosts of Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics, joined us today to talk about what’s next for Camp and what this means for Michigan in Congress.

Jonathan Oosting
Twitter

The Affordable Care Act shop door now has a "closed" sign on it, for the most part.

The open enrollment deadline passed at midnight.

Attention in Michigan now swings over to Healthy Michigan.

That's the official name for Michigan's expanded Medicaid program. It allows the state to bring more low-income residents into the Medicaid fold using funding available through the Affordable Care Act.

And Michigan's Medicaid expansion is something other states are watching because of a couple of important new twists to the program.

MLive Capitol reporter Jonathan Oosting joins us now.

Pages