A meteor during the peak of the 2009 Leonid Meteor Shower. The photograph shows the meteor, afterglow, and wake as distinct components.
user Navicore / Wikimedia Commons

Astronomy enthusiasts are gearing up for a viewing of the Leonid meteor shower, set to peak between midnight and dawn tomorrow.

Headlands International Dark Sky Park near Mackinaw City is welcoming a host of stargazers for one of the biggest meteor showers of the year. Mary Stewart Adams, program director at the Headlands International Dark Sky Park, spoke with Stateside about the Leonids.

The shower is produced when a comet coming through our planetary system breaks into pieces as it approaches the sun, Adams says. The Earth orbits through the comet debris, giving the appearance of falling stars.

Jeremy Sternberg/flickr /

It was August 1998 when FBI agent Greg Stejskal got a phone call about a meteorite stolen from the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History.

“Nobody really expected anybody to walk off with a 60-pound meteorite,” remembers Stejskal.

Eventually, the FBI and U of M police tracked down a guy named Steven Collins, who denied knowing how the meteorite was stolen.

In this interview with Stateside, retired agent Stejskal tells the story of the missing meteorite and how it was eventually found.


Beginning this weekend, state parks are hosting a special weeklong stargazing event.

The annual Perseid meteor shower will reach its peak during the next few days.

Elissa Dennert is with the Department of Natural Resources. She says nearly two dozen state parks will host stargazing events to give people a great view of the heavens.

  First on Stateside, we take a look at the "Grand Bargain" in Detroit. The state has taken a big step closer to putting money down to help Detroit. 

JPMorgan Chase is investing $100 million in Detroit's future, but what does that mean for the city, and what are JPMorgan's motives?

Only 28% of you said that Michigan is the best possible state to live in, according to a Gallup Poll. So Michigan kicked off the Why I Stay project, to find out exactly why you are still in Michigan. Michigan Radio's Mark Brush joined us.

Then, a meteor shower is headed our way Friday night, so it's time to dust off those binoculars and look to the sky. 

Michigan's expansion on Medicaid – Healthy Michigan – is on track for enrollee sign-up. 

Last, we learn about a fish that has a notoriously bad reputation: the Asian carp.

*Listen to the full episode above. 

One of the brightest meteor showers of the year happens overnight. It’s called the the Perseid meteor shower and although it happens for several days, it will peak around 3 a.m. Saturday.

The meteor showers happen as the Earth makes its annual trip around the sun and encounters a particular trail of comet dust.

Sally Oey is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Michigan. She says as the Earth travels through this comet dust, little particles enter our Earth’s atmosphere and appear as meteors or “shooting stars.”