Michigan Innocence Clinic

Law
6:10 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Attorneys hope for new trial for Michigan man convicted of 1996 murder

Jamie Lee Peterson's attorneys say there are serious doubts about his guilt in a 1996 rape and murder in Kalkaska.
Michigan Department of Corrections

Attorneys today will ask for a new trial for a man convicted of a 1996 rape and murder in Kalkaska.

They say new evidence raises serious doubts about the man’s guilt.

Jamie Lee Peterson is serving a life sentence for the 1996 murder of Geraldine Montgomery. He did confess to the crime, but he later recanted.

Last year, authorities arrested another man after DNA evidence connected him to the crime.

Caitlin Plummer is with the Michigan Innocence Clinic. She says the limits of DNA testing at the time were used by prosecutors to sway jurors against Peterson.  

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Law
6:27 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

The kid or the hit man: who killed 4 people?

Davontae Sanders was a partially blind, developmentally delayed 14-year-old when he was charged with murder.

The Michigan Court of Appeals today heard the case of a 14-year-old boy convicted of four murders.

The court is considering evidence that the now 20-year-old man may be innocent.

In 2007, four people were shot in a Detroit neighborhood.

Police picked up Davontae Sanford, a partially blind, developmentally-delayed 14-year-old.

They held him for questioning without a parent or attorney present.

Sanford confessed and was given decades in prison.

Then, a convicted hit man, Vincent Smothers, said he - not Sanford - committed those murders.

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Law
7:20 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Detroit bankruptcy could scuttle wrongly-imprisoned man's lawsuit

Dwayne Provience, before his release from prison.

 The human costs of Detroit’s bankruptcy are revealing themselves as the case proceeds in court.

For Dwayne Provience, it means yet more uncertainty over an already years-long wrongful imprisonment lawsuit.

When a city files for Chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy, all its lawsuits get put on hold. That’s a good thing for the city, as it struggles to conserve cash and get its financial house in order.

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Law
5:16 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Michigan man convicted on 'junk science' is now free

Victor Caminata hugs a member of his defense team.
Chris Lamphere Cadillac News

He spent four years in prison after he was convicted in 2009 on an arson charge. But now he is free after a team of lawyers from the University of Michigan's Innocence Clinic proved he was wrongfully convicted.

The Innocence Clinic team said Caminata was convicted on "junk science."

The Clinic has more on Caminata's conviction:

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What's Working
1:29 pm
Tue June 14, 2011

Michigan Innocence Clinic works to free those wrongfully convicted

David Moran is the co-director of the Michigan Innocence Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School.
screen grab from YouTube video

Imagine being picked up by police for a crime you did not commit. You plead your innocence, but no one believes you.

Now imagine you're convicted and sentenced to prison for that crime.

For our What's Working series, Michigan Radio host Christina Shockley spoke with David Moran, the co-director of the Michigan Innocence Clinic.

The Clinic, at the University of Michigan Law School, aims to overturn the convictions of people who were wrongfully convicted.

It's estimated that 1,500 people currently in Michigan prisons were wrongfully convicted.

You can hear the interview with David Moran above.

And here's a video from the Michigan Innocence Clinic on the case of Dwayne Provience who spent ten years in prison for a crime he did not commit.

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