Michigan Liquor Control Commission

The Founders baby will remain on labels in other states.
Mike Mozart / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

"You wanna sell beer in this state? You gotta go through me, kid."

While not an exact quote, that's essentially what Michigan's Liquor Control Commission said when it found that the label for Founders Breakfast Stout was in violation of its rules, which say:

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The state Liquor Control Commission is unlikely to consider approving sales of powdered alcohol until after state lawmakers decide on a possible ban.

Federal regulators approved a dehydrated alcohol product earlier this year that could be sold in powdered form.  The powder could be rehydrated to create a six-ounce cocktail. 

Is powdered alcohol in Michigan's future?

Mar 16, 2015
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau recently approved a powdered alcohol product called Palcohol.  Add water, and you get a rum or vodka drink.

But it can't be sold in Michigan without the approval of the Michigan Liquor Control Commission. 

beaumontpete / Flickr Creative Commons

The Michigan Liquor Control Commission has proposed allowing self-serve machines that dispense up to 96 ounces of beer, wine or mixed spirit drink in a single order.

The machine "could be on a wall. It could be in a booth or built into a table," said Andrew Deloney, chair of the Commission.

Customers must place a new order for each additional 96 ounces, said Deloney, and for each order, "the server still has the same obligation to make sure that people are of legal drinking age and that they are not visibly intoxicated."

Michigan bar owners will be allowed to display political signs in their taverns.

The Michigan Liquor Control Commission today agreed to stop enforcing a 1954 rule which barred businesses with liquor licenses from posting signs endorsing political candidates.

The owners of Ann Arbor's Aut Bar filed suit against the rule last week, after they were told they had to take down signs for Democratic candidates.

Should the state of Michigan’s liquor control commission be allowed to ban the sale of a certain beer based on its name? That’s the question a federal judge in Grand Rapids will decide, following arguments this week.

People can buy several kinds of Flying Dog beer in Michigan already; In-heat wheat, Doggie Style pale ale, and Horn Dog barley wine for starters.

The state of Michigan argues the name of Flying Dog’s latest beer is a “sexist, derogatory and demeaning portrayal of women.”

Alan Gura is the brewery’s attorney.

 “The liquor commissioners don’t happen to like the name of Flying Dog’s Raging Bitch beer. They think it’s very offensive, we simply think that’s too bad.”

Michigan residents can once again buy flavored malt beverages like Four Loko. The caffeine infused alcoholic drink was banned by many states and by the Food and Drug Administration last year. Caffeine can make it difficult for consumers to realize just how much alcohol they’ve consumed.