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Michigan Republican Party

Tonya Schuitmaker
Senate PhotoWire

 

On August 25th, Republicans will meet for the 2018 state convention to nominate candidates. 

Among those vying for the nomination for Michigan Attorney General are Representative Tom Leonard, currently Speaker of the House, and state Senator Tonya Schuitmaker.

Kenny Eishoff / WDIV

Thursday night’s Republican governor’s debate saw Attorney General Bill Schuette touting his ties to President Trump, Lieutenant Governor Brian Calley focusing on his record with Gov. Snyder, State Senator Patrick Colbeck playing up his conservative credentials, and Dr. Jim Hines playing the role of non-politician outsider in the race.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Vice President Mike Pence will be in Michigan Friday. 

He’s helping to raise money for one of the Republicans running for governor.

Pence is the key note speaker at a noon hour fundraiser for Attorney General Bill Schuette’s gubernatorial campaign at the Townsend Hotel in Birmingham.

The four Republican governor candidates on the stage together for the debate
Screenshot from WOOD-TV's stream of the debate / WOOD-TV

The four Republicans running for governor held their first debate this week. It was the first time Attorney General Bill Schuette, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines have appeared together on one stage.

There were arguments over the handling of the Flint water crisis and who's the biggest Trump supporter. One thing they all agreed on is that Michigan should not legalize recreational marijuana, but they said they'd respect the wishes of the voters. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about what else stood out in the debate.

The four Republican governor candidates on the stage together for the debate
Screenshot from WOOD-TV's stream of the debate / WOOD-TV

 


 

The four Republicans who want to be your next Governor held a debate last night in Grand Rapids on WOOD TV.

 

It was the first time Attorney General Bill SchuetteLieutenant Governor Brian CalleyState Senator Patrick Colbeck, and Saginaw obstetrician Dr. Jim Hines were all together on one stage. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

President Trump’s Saturday night speech in northern Macomb County became the latest skirmish in Michigan’s Republican race for governor.

During his speech, President Trump made it clear who he supports in Michigan’s governor’s race.

“We’re honored to be joined by a great friend of mine and a great Attorney general, the next governor of Michigan, Bill Schuette,” Trump told the cheering crowd packed into the Total Sports Park indoor soccer field.

President Trump
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

President Trump spent Saturday night rallying his supporters in Michigan.

The president told his Macomb County audience he had another invitation for Saturday night.

“You may have heard I was invited to another event tonight. The White House Correspondents Dinner,” Trump told the crowd, which began booing. “But I’d much rather be in Washington, Michigan than Washington, D.C. right now.”

The president talked about a wide range of topics, from de-nuclearization on the Korean Peninsula to Michigan’s auto industry.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This year, TV ad spending is spiking early among candidates running for Michigan governor.

The Michigan Campaign Finance Network reports $1.7 million has been spent on TV ads to promote candidates in Michigan’s governor’s race. 

The network’s Craig Mauger says most of that spending was by Democrat Shri Thanedar, who’s poured $1.2 million into TV campaign ads since the January 1.

MSU Board of Trustees

EAST LANSING, Mich.- Brian Breslin will not seek re-election this year as a Michigan State University trustee.

Sarah Anderson, spokeswoman for the Michigan Republican Party, says Breslin has informed party officials. Voters choose candidates who are nominated by political parties.

  Breslin is chairman of the MSU Board of Trustees. He has expressed support for President Lou Anna Simon during the controversy over Larry Nassar, who sexually assaulted girls while he was an MSU sports doctor.

A photo of Bob Young from his campaign's facebook page
Bob Young Jr. / Facebook

The 2018 U.S. Senate race got a shake-up Wednesday, but not because someone was entering the race. Instead, the shake-up came from Republican Bob Young's decision to step down as a candidate. 

mike pence
whitehouse.gov

Vice President Mike Pence will try to rally support in Michigan tomorrow for the new Republican tax reform plan. He’ll speak Thursday afternoon at American Axle Manufacturing in Auburn Hills.

The plan unveiled this week almost doubles the standard deduction for married taxpayers filing jointly to $24,000. Individual filers will see their standard deduction increase to $12,000.

RNC national chairwoman Ronna McDaniel and Michigan Republican Party Chair Ron Weiser addressed the media for opening remarks, but the roundtable discussion was not made available to reporters.
Tyler Scott / Michigan Radio

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel hosted a roundtable discussion with African-American community leaders in Detroit on Monday.

McDaniel opened with a swift condemnation of white supremacy after the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia Saturday.

“As chairman of the Republican party, I want to be perfectly clear,” McDaniel said. “That white supremacy, Neo-Nazi, KKK, and hate speech and bigotry is not welcome, and does not have a home in the Republican Party.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

State Republicans and Democrats are sparring over a proposal to keep some key Affordable Care Act provisions in place in Michigan, even if Congress succeeds in repealing Obamacare.

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar.
Screen grab from YouTube.com

President Trump's first speech before a joint session of Congress delivered themes and promises that are very familiar. It was delivered in a tone many have remarked was more presidential and more aspirational.

Rep. Paul Michell (R) and Rep. Dan Kildee (D) joined Stateside to give a perspective of last night's speech from both sides of the aisle.

From the Republican side, Congressman Paul Mitchell, who represents Michigan's 10th District, said the speech "captured the aspirations of Americans."

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - A former chairman of the Michigan Republican party is leading the GOP again.

Ron Weiser was unanimously elected Saturday as chairman. Ronna Romney McDaniel stepped down to become head of the national party.

Meanwhile, Brandon Dillon was given another term as chairman of the Michigan Democratic Party. Both parties are holding conventions this weekend.

Weiser told 3,000 party members in Lansing that "united we win; divided we lose." McDaniel gave a farewell speech, saying President Donald Trump's victory gives Michigan "the respect it deserves."

aol.com

The Secretary of the Marquette County Republican Party has stepped down after he tweeted the suggestion that violent protestors at the University of California - Berkeley should be shot.

Dan Adamini says he resigned so he isn't a distraction to the work of the Republican Party.

"Whenever you join an organization, you want to do it because you can be helpful," said Adamini. "And with all the hateful messages and death threats that have been coming not just to me but to other people in the party, I thought it would be best if I stepped aside." 

Michigan Republican Party

His only opposition bowed out of the race last weekend. Now, University of Michigan Regent Ron Weiser is in line to succeed Ronna Romney McDaniel as chairman of Michigan's Republican Party.

McDaniel is the new head of the Republican National Committee.

Weiser was state party chair from 2009-11 and he joined Stateside to talk about the job, the state of the Republican Party and why it was "duty not desire" that drove him back to the chairman role.

Thetoad / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The new Michigan legislature was in session this week, and there has been no shortage of topics to discuss.

To help sort through it all in Stateside's weekly political roundup is Ken Sikkema, senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants and a former Republican legislative leader; and Vicki Barnett, a former Democratic legislator.

The origin of the term "gerrymandering" comes from a political cartoon from March of 1812. This was drawn in reaction to the newly-drawn state senate election district of South Essex created by the Massachusetts legislature.
J. Albert Bowden II / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In March of 1812, the Boston Gazette printed a political cartoon that showed the bizarre and twisted shape of a newly-redrawn election district.

The paper was responding to redistricting of the Massachusetts state Senate districts pushed through by Governor Elbridge Gerry. The redistricting certainly benefited the governor's Democratic-Republican Party.

Michael Dorausch / Flickr, http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today, the Board of State Canvassers deadlocked on President-elect Donald Trump’s request to stop a recount of votes in this state.

Two Republicans on the board voted today to prevent the recount, while two Democrats said it should proceed.

The state chair of the Republican Party, Ronna Romney McDaniel said the party expected this result.

A state spokesman announced the recount will begin Tuesday or Wednesday, barring a court order.

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

Lessenberry breaks down Election 2016

Nov 9, 2016
Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

America has a new president-elect this morning, but the jury is still out when it comes to which candidate will carry Michigan.

On this Week in Michigan Politics Doug Tribou and Jack Lessenberry talk about how Donald Trump could become the first Republican to carry the state since 1988. They also discuss Republican victories in the 1st and 7th Congressional Districts, and the Republican's sustained control of  the state House and Supreme Court.


steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s some mystery about who’s trying to rally support for Libertarian Party candidates in two Michigan state House races.

In recent weeks, fliers promoting the Libertarians starting showing up in mail boxes at homes in the 61st (Portage, MI) and 91st (parts of Muskegon County) districts.   The fliers tout the Libertarians conservative credentials.   But the fliers don’t say who’s behind them. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Campaign spending on 15 pivotal state House seats tops $10 million, according to the Michigan Campaign Finance Network. 

Democrats need to win nine state House seats currently held by Republicans to wrest control of the lower chamber in Lansing. And both sides are spending heavily.

Jack Bergman
Screen grab of "Your Choice - Lt. General Jack Bergman (Ret.) for Congress" / Jack Bergman

The most hotly contested congressional race in Michigan is widely viewed as happening in the First Congressional District. It covers the entire Upper Peninsula and a good-sized chunk of the northern Lower Peninsula.

Earlier this month on Stateside, Zoe Clark spoke with the Democratic contender, Lon Johnson. Today, we spoke with Republican candidate, retired Marine Lt. General Jack Bergman.

Balloons drop at the 2012 Republican National Convention.
PBS NewsHour / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In big election years like this one, the two major parties typically host election night parties where candidates and party officials gather to hopefully celebrate their victories.

But this year, there will be no big party for the Michigan Republican Party. 

More from Chad Livengood of the Detroit News:

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

The last presidential debate is over, and a light is starting to appear at the end of the election season tunnel. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and I talk about whether we'll see much more campaign action in Michigan before voters cast their ballots. We also discuss the ousting of the state Republican Party's grassroots chair over her refusal to back Donald Trump, and a big step toward financial health in Wayne County.


President Donald Trump
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is putting members of his own party in Michigan in a tough spot. With slumping poll numbers, there are some concerns that he could have a negative impact on down-ballot races in the Great Lakes State.

With Trump at the top of the ticket, what is the state of the Michigan Republican Party? There's party infighting, concerns about possibly losing the state House in November, and some candidates simply refusing to endorse or even answer questions about their party's presidential nominee, Donald Trump. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Democrats and Republicans are spending heavily on TV ad buys to sway voters in a handful of state house elections.

Democrats need to win 9 seats currently held by Republicans next month to take control of the state house.    

people in voting booths
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Indiana Governor Mike Pence brings the campaign spotlight to Macomb County tonight. He'll be speaking at the Lincoln Day dinner in Shelby Township. Organizers say it’s the largest crowd in recent memory for the Lincoln Day dinner, and it’s proof that Macomb County is still fertile ground for the GOP message.

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